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Old 07-14-2016, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
4,883 posts, read 5,764,575 times
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I have seen some of those.
There are some similar dugouts near Raidersburg. The old miners cabins in Jardine and Emigrant are not much more than an enclosed sleeping area. Most don't have a stove or fireplace even.
Basically, those guys weren't worried about comfort as much as just a warm dry place to sleep. Some of those guys did most of their cooking outside over a campfire during the digging season, and wintered in town.
Lumber was scarce, so not many cabins were made of boards until the railroads came, but it was still expensive so the cabins remained small and uninsulated.
This is a picture of one from the old state capital at Bannock



Reeder's alley in Helena was where the teamsters wintered when the weather got so bad they couldn't make the trip to Fort Benton. They would hole up until the roads dried out in the spring and started the new season. Many times several guys would share a small shack, (like the one pictured) and sometimes take turns sleeping depending on how many beds and floor space was available.
You get 10 or 12 guys sharing a cabin like this and it probably got pretty ripe living that close with so many guys when there were really no bathing facilities.


Up on top of the Elkhorns there's a small line shack still standing where cowboys would stay and care for the stock until roundup in the fall.
It's about 8x10, it does have what's left of a stove and the remains of a bunk. The cabin is hardly tall enough for a man of about 5'4" to stand upright in, but that was about it. The door is only about 4 feet tall so you have to duck pretty good just to get into it.
There was room for one straight back chair, a tiny table, and a shelf for a lamp. nails on the wall for hanging your bridle, halter, rope and any extra clothes.


They were better protection than a tent of that period, barely, many had canvas roofs, but they did have fairly solid walls and were better than sleeping in the open anyway.
Amazing how these guys lived, they had to be tough.
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Old 07-14-2016, 05:08 PM
 
242 posts, read 199,826 times
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Wow, simple but efficient. My cabin is much more over-engineered and fancy due to the solid log construction, sleek windows on the front and roofing, plus insulation about to go in.
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Old 07-14-2016, 05:09 PM
 
242 posts, read 199,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamies View Post
I'm taking it that there are no building codes?
I wonder what makes you say such a thing? lol.

In Montana it's kinda old-school not nanny-state. Just the way I like it.
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Old 07-14-2016, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,540 posts, read 12,570,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTSilvertip View Post
Many times several guys would share a small shack, (like the one pictured)
That was a pretty nice little cabin in its day. Looks like someone has reroofed it at least once... if it gets a little maintenance along the way, it might last another 100 years.
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Old 07-14-2016, 07:02 PM
 
Location: MA/ME (the way life should not be / the way it should be)
1,267 posts, read 976,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
That was a pretty nice little cabin in its day. Looks like someone has reroofed it at least once... if it gets a little maintenance along the way, it might last another 100 years.
I agree with this statement, does seem alittle run down, but it IS in much better condition than some things i see around here (even with homes <50 years old). Would take some work, but not as much as if you wanted to fixup a modern home with electric and plumbing .
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Old 07-18-2016, 02:26 AM
 
99 posts, read 69,558 times
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Sorry, been away for a week since my last reply.
Wanna thank you for the replies regarding OSB boards!


I do realize you have some other laws and regulations regarding building codes and how a house should be built. And you americans are way better at being cost-effective when it comes down to it.


OSB seems a bit cheaper in the US compared to here, so I understand it's an easy and cheap way to raise a construction fast and in no way is it bad either. Might look a bit ugly but that's in the eye of the beholder


Keep on the nice build and enjoy the outdoors!
I'm leaving town for a week in the woods starting Friday! But we're up here in the north of Sweden but it sure is free and wild!
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Old 07-18-2016, 02:58 PM
 
242 posts, read 199,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seww6 View Post
Sorry, been away for a week since my last reply.
Wanna thank you for the replies regarding OSB boards!


I do realize you have some other laws and regulations regarding building codes and how a house should be built. And you americans are way better at being cost-effective when it comes down to it.


OSB seems a bit cheaper in the US compared to here, so I understand it's an easy and cheap way to raise a construction fast and in no way is it bad either. Might look a bit ugly but that's in the eye of the beholder


Keep on the nice build and enjoy the outdoors!
I'm leaving town for a week in the woods starting Friday! But we're up here in the north of Sweden but it sure is free and wild!
Thanks.

I 'dress' my OSB in Tar paper then will clad it with logs!
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Old 07-18-2016, 03:00 PM
 
242 posts, read 199,826 times
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Here's the latest video, showing the installation of the floor into the cabin. Part 2 is ready but hasn't been uploaded yet:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=he-Y532JH7k
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Old 07-20-2016, 02:23 PM
 
242 posts, read 199,826 times
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Here's the follow-up video completing the floor making series:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AdiSMKu8Is8
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Old 07-21-2016, 12:47 PM
 
242 posts, read 199,826 times
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Getting the walls completed has taken me nearly a month to complete! But complete it is near as dammit! In that time I've been doing other things too, but mostly the walls took the lion's share of the work. The other bits and pieces were windows (two of three are now fitted) and the outhouse (that took just over two days). Two doors (a main door and a side-door leading to the kitchen / stores) were five days alone to build the frames and mount them!







The challenge of the walls was as folllows:

The angle of the roof to contend with, the blocking that meant 50% of it became a custom fit or 'puzzle pieces' as I like to call them, all really tested me to the limit. I am not a carpenter by trade but have worked with them and picked up a few of their skills.

Getting vent holes drilled for the roof void, I hit a hidden screw and needed a new spade bit!:



There were gaps but these I filled withe expanding foam here and there. I'm not too bothered about pure aesthetic at the moment as tar paper is going over the whole lot.



Half of the tar paper is already in place too. I have an upper window left to fit too. Some sheeting is temporarily in place to keep the wind and moisture at bay in the meantime.



I can now lock my cabin up!



Night of the Rats!

The walls and doors etc I got up just in the nick of time too as a few pack rats tried to get in while I was asleep inside! It was like being under siege, they were surrounding the place it seemed, probing and checking for ways into my refuge! I heard them scuttle and scratch about the kitchen area, one even got inside the underfloor insulation to scurry around! No food that I'd sealed up was even nibbled though. Those MREs really are scent-proof!

The next day I had to scurry around under the cabin like a rat to figure out how my cabin's underbelly was penetrated! I didn't have to look for long before my detective work paid off. The answer was in the small support posts for the floor I'd installed.
The bark had been left on three of them and at one of these a little critter had used it to climb and chew down a bit of tar paper to scurry inside. Although I was pissed off at having to fix the issue, I had to admire it's acrobatic survivalist skills. No doubt it was scouting out a potential hibernation nest for the winter. Not on my watch though! Rats are a real mess and poop all over the place. So I donned my overallsand got some galvanized steel flashing cut to size. I had to scurry about thrice to get the wraps onto the three little logs, making them climb-proof, I repaired the tar paper too.
That night I heard some scurring as the little rat survivalist came to try and check on his hiding spot. I don't think he even bothered to try climb it with the steel wrap now covering the bark! Mission accommplished.

The solar array is now totally part of the cabin so no more going outside to turn on or turn off the inverter in the power tent either. I fitted a more powerful 1200 watt one too. It doesn't whirr about as much as the 400 watt but is a bit noisier.

From a fellow Cabineer family generously gave me their spare fridge/freezer and mattress! The former I will install in the kitchen area, the latter I will need to build or obtain a bed frame for.

The next step is to work on the internal wiring for the cabin, plus fuses and the junction box etc. Only then can I think about insulating the walls. Additionally I should work on sealing up the eaves also very soon with blocking and mesh. Moths and other bugs always find a way in, especially at night once the lights come on at night etc.
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