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Old 07-14-2017, 07:23 AM
 
10 posts, read 6,935 times
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Looking for a pitbull friendly rental if it exists in Billings. 1 or 2 br under 1k a month - preferably close to the hospital.
Any suggestions? Not finding much on craigslist and none of the property management places seem to allow pitbulls.
Thanks
M
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Old 07-14-2017, 10:02 AM
 
347 posts, read 338,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by preciouspkgs View Post
Looking for a pitbull friendly rental if it exists in Billings. 1 or 2 br under 1k a month - preferably close to the hospital.
Any suggestions? Not finding much on craigslist and none of the property management places seem to allow pitbulls.
Thanks

M
I can't say I blame them. Whenever I see a pit bull on the street, I'm ready to grab my .38 and unload....for self defense purposes of course...and I'm a dog lover. Sounds like the property management people feel the same way. Looks like you may be out of luck.

Welcome to Montana.
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Old 07-16-2017, 02:58 PM
 
Location: 406
1,423 posts, read 1,542,433 times
Reputation: 1407
I wasn't aware that pit bull owners might struggle to find rentals in Billings; in fact, I know a couple who, along with their pit bull, rented a very nice small home near the arena when they lived in Billings just 2-3 years ago. I couldn't tell you the name of their property owner/service, unfortunately.

I can definitely sympathize with a landlord for their reluctance to house pit bulls on their properties, though. Sadly, very recently, there was a fatal dog attack in Bozeman involving a pit. The victim was the dog owner's landlord. (And what can I say, an unknown, un-muzzled pit coming in my direction, leashed or not, is a little unnerving for me as well.)

But yeah, sorry I can't be more help.
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Old 08-03-2017, 09:33 PM
 
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A little education goes a long way. If you look at the top 10 dog breeds for biting in the last 5 years, pits aren't even on the list. They just get the sensationalized press. ANY dog can and will bite if given the right circumstances, or the wrong upbringing. Regardless, in case anyone else is looking - there are pitbull friendly apartments out there. I am not going to name them so that they don't get stormed by people like Antonio.
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Old 08-04-2017, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Phila
458 posts, read 856,872 times
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I know of 3 people bit by dogs in the last year. All 3 pitbulls. That resulted in enforcement of leash laws in our local park where dogs enjoyed being free for decades prior. Bad owners ruin it for everyone else (they all 3 fled the scene after). They may not all bite, but the stats don't lie. I got no problem with people having them, but be responsible. If you can't be 110% sure they aren't going to attack another dog/human, they shouldn't be off leash around them. I'm a dog owner myself. Honestly, they generally unnerve me too as someone else said.

We live in an area with underground dog fighting rings (Mike Vicks's old stomping ground) and I think people rescue the thowaways with good intention, but might not know what they are getting into. Good luck, stay safe. I know here apartments have lists of breed restrictions (doberman, akita, german sheppard, mastiff, etc etc).
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Old 08-06-2017, 11:58 AM
 
347 posts, read 338,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by preciouspkgs View Post
A little education goes a long way. If you look at the top 10 dog breeds for biting in the last 5 years, pits aren't even on the list. They just get the sensationalized press. ANY dog can and will bite if given the right circumstances, or the wrong upbringing. Regardless, in case anyone else is looking - there are pitbull friendly apartments out there. I am not going to name them so that they don't get stormed by people like Antonio.
When I made my previous post in this thread, I had on my mind fatalities caused by pit bulls, not merely bites. Should I have made that clear? Perhaps. However, at the end of the day, reality is reality, whether you like it or not. As Wisertime said, "the stats don't lie". From my research and simply paying attention to the news, whenever I hear about a dog mauling a human being to death, 99.9% it is a pit bull. When it comes to my safety and the safety of my loved ones, I prefer to focus on facts instead of feelings.

The danger of pit bulls mauling people to death is real, and we just had a horrible tragedy of a pit-bull mauling someone to death in the Bozeman area. This was unspeakably tragic. At the same time, I'm thankful I live in a great state like Montana that allows me to carry a concealed firearm in most locations, so I can protect myself against a pit bull or other dangerous animal or human being that tries to kill me.


Any pit bull that attacks me will have to say hello to my little friend, if you know what I mean.
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Northern Rockies
148 posts, read 123,282 times
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Like Antonio said, a very well respected member of Bozeman's community was recently mauled to death by her tenant's pitbull. Finding suitable accommodation with a pit is probably a tall order around here, but maybe possible, if you can find some bleeding heart to rent you a space.
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Old 08-08-2017, 05:37 PM
 
727 posts, read 929,223 times
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Most human fatalities by dog are pit bulls: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatal_...ported_in_2017
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Old 09-28-2017, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,543 posts, read 12,604,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrwumpus View Post
Most human fatalities by dog are pit bulls: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatal_...ported_in_2017
Here's the problem with that:

Pick the Pit - Can you find the Pitbull?

Yeah, if you're a dog person, a lot of these are obviously not pits. But they're all breeds that have been mistaken for pits by law enforcement or animal control. And even someone who should know better can screw it up: an official dog show photographer once sent me a photo of a pitbull that he'd mistaken for one of my Labs.

Ontario (Canada) outlawed pits entirely, and went around confiscating and killing every dog that matched the description: short coat, broad head. Two purebred, registered Labrador Retrievers [that I know of] were destroyed under this program (over the owners' vehement protests and even in the face of contrary documentation). Denver banned pits, and proceeded to confiscate and kill ~8000 innocent pets that had never harmed anyone, and whose crime was that they resembled a pitbull (at least in someone's opinion).

What's been the effect of pitbull bans? an increase in bites by other dogs. Because dogs behave like dogs, and that is far more determined by circumstances than it is by breed. In fact under standarized temperament testing, pitbulls score among the more stable breeds, while a lot of what we think of as "mild pet breeds" score considerably lower. When used as a police dog, you can command a pitbull to stop biting the perp, and they will immediately back off; you usually have to choke off the German shepherd. (But pitbulls were developed to fight with other dogs, and one that bit its handler would catch a bullet; contrary to its now-sanitized history, the German shepherd was developed purely as a man-killer.)

I'm a canine professional with over 40 years experience, and here's something I've learned from keeping multiple dogs: even a completely non-aggressive dog may suddenly pile on with intent-to-kill if another dog in the group goes down and screams. It's a pack instinct to kill the weakling, and it doesn't stop until the "weakling" is dead (and is MUCH more likely to trigger with two or more dogs, not so likely with a single dog). Most "fatal dog attacks" fit this pattern, one way or another -- someone trips and falls and cries out, the dogs abruptly behave like a pack, and the astonished victim isn't assertive enough to make the dogs back off. This is why the owners are usually utterly baffled that their sweet, loving dogs killed grandma.

Every generation has its "scary dog". Right now it's pitbulls. A few decades back it was Dobermans, and before that, German Shepherds. And what was the "scary dog" of the Prohibition era? Collies. And before that? Airedales (as one old book put it, the best breed for killing tramps.)
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Old 10-03-2017, 09:43 AM
 
727 posts, read 929,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
Here's the problem with that:

Pick the Pit - Can you find the Pitbull?

Yeah, if you're a dog person, a lot of these are obviously not pits.
That's quite a stretch to suggest that multiple law enforcement personnel and coroner detectives misidentified pit bulls and pit bull mixes so often as to skew the statistics that much. The burden would be on you to prove that in each case to wield that argument.

I've owned a pit bull mix (Airedale) and it was a wonderful dog for people, very sensitive and noble and protective. But it could not control itself around other dogs (or horses). It simply delighted in a good fight, and once got into a scrap with the neighbor's Rottweiler. The neighbor had to take his dog to the vet for stitches and my dog came home wagging his tail. The difference I noted with my dog compared to others I owned was that pain did not appear to be a motivating factor in stopping this instinct. I've seen him with his canine totally through his bottom lip and he totally unphased, still trying to get at the other dog.
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