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Old 09-19-2010, 05:45 PM
 
152 posts, read 289,969 times
Reputation: 108

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
Actually I'd prefer simply nailing them to the nearest tree as a warning to others, but since we'd run out of trees before we ran out of offenders...
Just doesn't seem right to take it out on the trees.
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Old 09-19-2010, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,540 posts, read 12,568,785 times
Reputation: 2952
Quote:
Originally Posted by nature's cathedral View Post
Just doesn't seem right to take it out on the trees.
Hmm. You're right. How about nailing 'em to fence posts instead??
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Old 09-20-2010, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Canackistan
746 posts, read 1,487,167 times
Reputation: 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
That's an excellent if oft-forgotten point. Whose tax dollars are going to maintain that newly-paved road? (Not to mention reconstruct the road base, which usually needs to be done to support pavement.) Don't forget, the cost of paving (and in town also drainage, curbs, sidewalks, and similar "improvements") is usually paid for by increased property taxes. Is it really worth that much to the people who use it? In most cases, the answer is no; the gravel road suffices.

Also, in Montana's climate, with its multiple freeze/thaw cycles every winter, maintaining paved roads is a lot more complex, and therefore more expensive, than in a single-freeze, single-thaw state (like practically anywhere east of the Badlands). Maintaining a paved road in anything like driveable condition can be cost-prohibitive.

So, yep... jump in the grader and go is a good solution for a lot of Montana roads. Not only that, but it helps preserve the character of Montana.
Have to agree. Having been born/raised in the province of Saskatchewan, that's all we knew. Even the streets in-town were gravel. Most of the R.M. just simply didn't have the cash. It's cheaper to pay 1-2 guys, maintain a couple graders and maybe a gravel truck vs. paying for road work.
Only the major highways in Sask are paved (and obviously the cities/major towns).

Plus it made for better driving lessons - operating grain trucks/tractors/farm equipment on a gravel road takes some skill when you're 12
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Old 09-20-2010, 01:48 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,540 posts, read 12,568,785 times
Reputation: 2952
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_gateway View Post
Plus it made for better driving lessons - operating grain trucks/tractors/farm equipment on a gravel road takes some skill when you're 12
Teach 'em young, for sure Can you imagine paving all those farm roads? And what those heavy trucks and farm equipment would do to the pavement??!
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Old 10-31-2010, 10:08 PM
 
6 posts, read 10,376 times
Reputation: 11
why is it that more than half the people on the MT boards complain about people moving into "their" state? it's not yours alone. furthermore what usually accompanies this disdain for newcomers is evidently their "liberal" beliefs. do any of you people know how ignorant you sound?
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Old 10-31-2010, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,540 posts, read 12,568,785 times
Reputation: 2952
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryHood View Post
why is it that more than half the people on the MT boards complain about people moving into "their" state? it's not yours alone. furthermore what usually accompanies this disdain for newcomers is evidently their "liberal" beliefs. do any of you people know how ignorant you sound?
Let's turn this notion around and look at it from the Montanan's point of view:
Furthermore what usually accompanies newcomers' disdain for existing residents is evidently their "conservative" beliefs. Do any of you people know how arrogant you sound?
It's not newcomers that are the problem. It's not liberal beliefs that are the problem. It's newcomers who try to shove their beliefs (and when this happens, usually it's from the liberal camp) down the throats of people who are already settled into Montana (whether they were born here, or were transplanted and put down roots).

The fact that you came here, brand new to this board, and two of your first six posts were put-downs of Montanans, stands to demonstrate the problem.

Back to the topic... one of the problems with Montana is that we're too willing to politely put up with this sort of thing from newcomers. But if we put up with too much of it for too long, it won't be Montana anymore.

Last edited by Reziac; 10-31-2010 at 11:00 PM.. Reason: unmudification
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Old 11-01-2010, 07:38 AM
 
Location: LEAVING CD
22,952 posts, read 22,452,692 times
Reputation: 15488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
Let's turn this notion around and look at it from the Montanan's point of view:
Furthermore what usually accompanies newcomers' disdain for existing residents is evidently their "conservative" beliefs. Do any of you people know how arrogant you sound?
It's not newcomers that are the problem. It's not liberal beliefs that are the problem. It's newcomers who try to shove their beliefs (and when this happens, usually it's from the liberal camp) down the throats of people who are already settled into Montana (whether they were born here, or were transplanted and put down roots).

The fact that you came here, brand new to this board, and two of your first six posts were put-downs of Montanans, stands to demonstrate the problem.

Back to the topic... one of the problems with Montana is that we're too willing to politely put up with this sort of thing from newcomers. But if we put up with too much of it for too long, it won't be Montana anymore.
From a "former" Montanan who considers himself still a Montanan you've hit it on the head! We moved in and out of Montana 3 times and it wasn't until the 3rd time we moved in that we "got it" and adopted the Montana way of life and were happy. We finally gave up the citified way of thinking/acting and gave up trying to bend Montana to what we "thought" those so called backward/ignorant people should be.
When we did this we finally were content (as content as one could get anywhere) and realized it was US that caused the problem and the solution so we were finally happy.
Now that we've had to move out again we're in a place that's soooo far from the Montana way of life it's not funny and very uncomfortable so we can't wait to get out.
Will we go back to Montana when we can leave here? Unfortunately unless global warming hits there big time that's just not in the cards since I can't take the long term cold. We'll head to the next best place of "backward/ignorant people" which is the south.
Don't waste your time looking at Montana through the citified glasses, change your prescription to a Montana lens and you'll look at life a whole different way!
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Old 11-01-2010, 08:39 AM
 
Location: NW Montana
6,258 posts, read 12,886,345 times
Reputation: 3429
The only current problem I can see is why isn't the oil industry here, we need jobs. Look at how well ND is doing.
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Old 11-01-2010, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,540 posts, read 12,568,785 times
Reputation: 2952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mt-7 View Post
The only current problem I can see is why isn't the oil industry here, we need jobs. Look at how well ND is doing.
I think yonder thread answers that one
Proposed big-rig shipments through ID and MT

It's always a question of balance. We don't want to wreck what Montana IS, but we can't survive without jobs, and that means industry that actually produces a salable good (tourism, "intellectual properties", and other service industries don't cut it, being entirely at the mercy of external economies). Basically that means farming/ranching, timber, mining, oil, energy, and general manufacturing (which can be just about anything you can use up or carry away), and maybe transportation (trucking, rail).

So how do we fix this? One obvious means is making the state tax-friendly and regulation-friendly to new and existing businesses. You can't enforce NIMBY and still have a vibrant economy, but you can't go destroying what's already there either, or you wind up as just another rust belt (even without union "help").

Further thought: it occurs to me that it's not really possible to have a long-term sound job-economy if all your jobs revolve around exporting raw goods (crude oil, wheat, beef on the hoof, etc.) There has to be some vertical integration, so not only raw materials, but also intermediate and finished products are produced locally. That way you get a broad spectrum of jobs and an economy less dependent on one product, rather than only providing jobs suitable for the physicially-fit and being at the mercy of the commodity market.

Last edited by Reziac; 11-01-2010 at 08:58 AM.. Reason: More thinkin'. If I keep this up I'm gonna wind up as a politician!
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Old 11-01-2010, 08:52 AM
 
Location: NW Montana
6,258 posts, read 12,886,345 times
Reputation: 3429
Yes I can see that but I do not see us as being able to not tap into what we have. We are dying over here as it is.
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