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Old 06-08-2009, 06:57 PM
 
307 posts, read 832,662 times
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Greetings. I have read on here about theexistence of wolves in Montana, which I think is great. My concern is for my dog. If I live in a rural town in the western or central part, and take my dog for walks which we are accustomed to, is there a danger threat? And if so, what do others do, and how do y'all handle this? I would appreciate any and all advice on this subject. Thanks so much!
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Old 06-08-2009, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Montana
193 posts, read 407,428 times
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I suggest you look into the SSS wolf program.
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Old 06-08-2009, 07:40 PM
 
307 posts, read 832,662 times
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Broz: what is that?
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Old 06-08-2009, 08:26 PM
 
Location: SCBC
148 posts, read 493,694 times
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I wouldn't say Y'ALL too much, you won't get much of a response!
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Old 06-08-2009, 08:29 PM
'M'
 
Location: Glendale Country Club
1,818 posts, read 2,607,435 times
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Are these actually wolves, or coyotes? I thought wolves are rare? I live in Colo, and what we see are coyotes only.
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Old 06-08-2009, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
4,891 posts, read 5,771,999 times
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The canadian grey wolf was introduced into Montana, Wyoming and Idaho in the 1990s.
They are roughly twice the size of the Rocky Mountain Timber Wolves native to the state. The timber wolves could get up to around 75-80 lbs for large males, but the introduced canadian greys get up to around 150 lbs.
They have expanded their population to around 1800 individuals.

They are a threat to pets, livestock and humans that the pets might run to for help.

Currently Montana law says that if you, your pets or your livestock are being attacked you may kill the wolf.

If you walk your dog in forest or primitive areas in western Montana, or southern Montana near the Absaroka-Beartooth mountains, as far north as the Northern end of the Crazy Mountains, you do stand a chance of encountering wolves.

If you see coyotes that is a good sign as that means there are no wolves near. Wolves kill coyotes.

Coyotes will attack pets as well, but usually the smaller dogs and house cats as is seen in Los Angeles or other dense population centers across the western United States.

Best advice, don't take your dogs into the forest service or wilderness areas in western/central Montana if you don't want them killed by wolves.

Grizzlies, Black bear and cougar may kill dogs also, but are not as prevelent or prone to attack dogs unless the dog gets too close.

Wolves are the only land animal besides humans that kill for pleasure.

That canadian wolves were introduced into Montana, "a good thing"? No.
A more realistic comparison is the snakehead fish that was introduced into eastern waters, or Kudzu down south.

Careful who you tell you are a wolf lover. That is worse than being a californian.
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Old 06-08-2009, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Montana
193 posts, read 407,428 times
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.


Shooting, shoveling, and shutting up - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

.
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Old 06-09-2009, 07:25 PM
 
307 posts, read 832,662 times
Reputation: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTSilvertip View Post
The canadian grey wolf was introduced into Montana, Wyoming and Idaho in the 1990s.
They are roughly twice the size of the Rocky Mountain Timber Wolves native to the state. The timber wolves could get up to around 75-80 lbs for large males, but the introduced canadian greys get up to around 150 lbs.
They have expanded their population to around 1800 individuals.

They are a threat to pets, livestock and humans that the pets might run to for help.

Currently Montana law says that if you, your pets or your livestock are being attacked you may kill the wolf.

If you walk your dog in forest or primitive areas in western Montana, or southern Montana near the Absaroka-Beartooth mountains, as far north as the Northern end of the Crazy Mountains, you do stand a chance of encountering wolves.

If you see coyotes that is a good sign as that means there are no wolves near. Wolves kill coyotes.

Coyotes will attack pets as well, but usually the smaller dogs and house cats as is seen in Los Angeles or other dense population centers across the western United States.

Best advice, don't take your dogs into the forest service or wilderness areas in western/central Montana if you don't want them killed by wolves.

Grizzlies, Black bear and cougar may kill dogs also, but are not as prevelent or prone to attack dogs unless the dog gets too close.

Wolves are the only land animal besides humans that kill for pleasure.

That canadian wolves were introduced into Montana, "a good thing"? No.
A more realistic comparison is the snakehead fish that was introduced into eastern waters, or Kudzu down south.

Careful who you tell you are a wolf lover. That is worse than being a californian.
I wasn't aware I suppose, that the sentiments concerning wolves were of a global despisement in this region. which is simply for lack of knowledge concerning this region and characteristics. Which leads to why I ask the questionssuch as this and many others. Thank you for your response, the information is appreciated.
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Old 06-09-2009, 07:41 PM
 
1,078 posts, read 2,282,879 times
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I live up by Lincoln. I had a yorkie killed by a pack of coyotes visible from my house early in morning. Six weeks later, my chihuahua ran out behind my house, yelped, then, no dog. Upon further inspection, two sets of wolf tracks were found along with blood and little dog hair. Please do not tell me the tracks were probably coyote. There is a big difference between the two. Also, there have been confirmed sightings of wolves around Lincoln. Keep smaller dogs next to you. I learned my lesson. They are not safe even in the vincinty of your own yard.
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Old 06-09-2009, 09:00 PM
 
110 posts, read 282,709 times
Reputation: 48
I can't imagine having a "little" dog in Montana- Besides Wolves, there are Coyotes, Mountain Lions, Bobcats, etc..
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