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Old 04-24-2010, 01:05 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
6,425 posts, read 7,298,858 times
Reputation: 1955
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElkHunter View Post
As some of you know, we're taking a team of horses and a sheepwagon to Alaska.

We've spent at least an hour a day picking ticks off the horses, the dogs, and each other. This year the ticks are terrible.
I thought the team of horses was supposed to be taking you and the wagon to Alaska. Are you sure you've got it hitched up right?

Be worth it to invest in a few flea-and-tick collars for the dogs; they really do work (my tenant trains her dogs down in tickville; since she got 'em the collars she finds dead shriveled-up ticks on the floor, but no live ones on the dogs). I'm thinking they'd work on the horses too, considering they're just permethrin (synthetic pyrethrin) not seriously different from Repel-X fly spray (which I use on myself whenever I visit tickville).
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Old 04-24-2010, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
17,623 posts, read 22,043,857 times
Reputation: 10727
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
I thought the team of horses was supposed to be taking you and the wagon to Alaska. Are you sure you've got it hitched up right?

Be worth it to invest in a few flea-and-tick collars for the dogs; they really do work (my tenant trains her dogs down in tickville; since she got 'em the collars she finds dead shriveled-up ticks on the floor, but no live ones on the dogs). I'm thinking they'd work on the horses too, considering they're just permethrin (synthetic pyrethrin) not seriously different from Repel-X fly spray (which I use on myself whenever I visit tickville).
Dogs have flea and tick collars. Horses have been sprayed. But they are so thick it's almost a loosing battle. On that yellow top, the ticks are easy to spot. I'll bet we flipped over 100 off the tarp in an hour.

As to who is taking who, it's kind of a toss up. Going around gate guards we kind of change rolls.

The horses do go in back right?
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Old 04-24-2010, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
6,425 posts, read 7,298,858 times
Reputation: 1955
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElkHunter View Post
Dogs have flea and tick collars. Horses have been sprayed. But they are so thick it's almost a loosing battle. On that yellow top, the ticks are easy to spot. I'll bet we flipped over 100 off the tarp in an hour.

As to who is taking who, it's kind of a toss up. Going around gate guards we kind of change rolls.

The horses do go in back right?
Damn, now I'm not sure. Maybe you've got the wagon on backwards?? Or does it depend on whether you're going north or south? But then how would you go east or west??

That's a LOT of ticks.. I've never seen it so bad it was snowing ticks! Maybe y'all oughta spray between the tarp and the wagon so you don't wind up with a hidden load, nasty buggers crawl in everywhere.
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Old 04-27-2010, 05:59 PM
 
10 posts, read 29,653 times
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Natchez, MS--Natchez Democrat (newspaper):
Spring brings warm weather, flower blooms, new life and buffalo gnats.
And while buffalo gnats are annoying to humans, they can be deadly to poultry, from backyard chickens to commercial bird-raising operations.
“In the last week, (the gnats) have started getting heavy again,” Adams County Extension Service Director David Carter said. “Last year they were really bad. We lost more than 1,000 birds — poultry and birds of prey — to buffalo gnats.”
The threat the gnats pose to poultry is unique due to the birds’ anatomy.
“The gnats get in their face, and the birds breathe them in and suffocate,” Carter said.
It’s also not unheard of for the birds to die of a toxic shock caused by the insect’s bites, Carter said.
“There is more than one way they can kill birds, and both are painful,” he said.
The gnats are actually black flies, and Carter said that unlike mosquitoes, buffalo gnats have a general resistance to DEET-based insect repellents.
They’re also harder to kill at the egg and larval levels than mosquitoes.
“They breed and lay their eggs under water where it is moving a bit, and the only way to control them is when our water temperature levels get up to a certain temperature, that’s the only biological control,” Carter said.
“With mosquitoes, you can just dump out standing water, but buffalo gnats don’t lay their eggs on top of standing water.”
The bugs can be controlled with a permethrin spray, and Carter said some poultry producers spray their birds’ beaks to protect them.
However, to achieve maximum effectiveness, the spray will have to be applied to the area several times throughout the day.
“A lot of the bigger farms will have equipment in the barn to spray a few times, but as the average homeowner you will probably have to go out there and spray,” Carter said. “There is nothing convenient about spraying for buffalo gnats.”
It’s also a good idea to have fans to keep the air circulating around the birds, and before applying permethrin, make sure it is labeled for poultry use, he said.
While the gnats may irritate other livestock, Carter said you should just look for blistering or swelling caused by gnat bites, but that the gnats will mostly just be a nuisance to the animals.
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Old 08-07-2014, 09:38 AM
 
8 posts, read 4,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happiness is View Post
Whenever the I begin to feel low in the cold, long winter, I remind myself... that's why we don't have chiggers and cockroaches everywhere like warmer places do!

I lived in El Salvador for a couple of months back in 1978. I got malaria from the mosquitos, had cockroaches in every kitchen drawer, and scorpions hiding on the tile floor.

You will enjoy the absence of annoying insects here! (Not that scorpions are insects, but we don't have 'em). ;-)
Actually, we do have scorpions in Montana, but it's only one species, known as the Northern Scorpion. They are very small (1/2 - 3/4 " in length) and are commonly found in South Eastern Montana, such as Billings (along the Rims, or Pictograph caves).
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Old 08-07-2014, 10:13 AM
 
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We do have Wasps and Hornets, but not a lot of them, and usually you only encounter them in the fall when they are searching for a place to winter. Most of the summer you will only see one once in a while.[/quote]

It's true that we do have wasps and hornets, but not quite as mildly as you put it. I see wasps and hornets on a daily basis, as long as the days are warm. This includes the spring time, when some snow is still on the ground. The biggest (not size, but numbers) wasp pest that we encounter here are yellow jackets (aka European Wasps). They can be highly aggressive, so you have to be careful. The best time to deal with them is at night, as long as you know where their nest is at, and then saturate that nest with wasp killer. You could try the far cheaper, less environmentally friendly method and use generic brake, or carborator cleaner, which kills instantly, and is probably far more effective than wasp killer. Most people like to call these wasps bees, but they are far from a bee. Bees sting once and they die. Wasps can sting repeatedly. Yellow jackets can be identified by their bright black and yellow colors. Paper wasps are often mistaken, due to the same color, but are far less agressive, and more slender. Another pest to watch out for here are common in a lot of northern states; wolf spiders, black widows, and hobo spiders (aka aggressive house spiders). Black widows need no introduction... just be careful. The wolf spider is not normally aggressive towards people, but can have a fairly painful bite, since they can grow to be the size of a small tarantula. The hobo spider can be very dangerous. They are related to the brown recluse, but with complete opposite demeanor (very bad attitudes). Brown recluses are just that.. reclusive. Hobo spiders are called aggressive house spiders for a reason. Their bites have a similar effect to that of the brown recluse, and if untreated, can cause need of amputation of the infected area, or sometimes even fatal. Just keep in mind that they move from house to house, which is why they are called hobos. They prefer cool, damp places (basements, forest floors), but can be found in homes as well. If your home is infested with a bunch of them just remember that they are very hard to kill. The only options are sticky traps, or spraying each one as you see them. Bug bombs... virtually ineffective. If you use a bug bomb you are really only eliminating their competition. Hope this helps.
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Old 08-07-2014, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
6,425 posts, read 7,298,858 times
Reputation: 1955
Those little compact black spiders you find in your house are in fact a "house spider" -- if you throw them outside, they're likely to die. They've been adapted to living inside human homes for at least 5000 years. And if you find one in your house, it means there are other bugs, which it is eating.

We had brown recluses where I lived in SoCal (biologists swear up and down there aren't any in CA, but they look unique and are easy to ID, and were hardly rare). The reason they're called a "recluse" isn't because they're not aggressive, but because they hide in small dark places a lot. They'll run right at you if disturbed. (I dunno what they'd do next, cuz I'd squish 'em.)

I let the big wolf spiders and wind scorpions live in the house, because they pretty much exterminated the crawling pests, like black widows that otherwise got into everything (we had to bug-bomb for black widows!) Once saw a wolf spider and a wind scorpion stalking each other -- the wind scorpion runs faster and has big strong jaws, but the wolf spider was faster in the clinch, and enjoyed a nice lunch.

We had Arizona Bark Scorpions too. only ever saw a couple of 'em (one in my kitchen!) but that might be what stung me one night -- hurt so bad for a whole day that I wanted to cut my toe off! but didn't swell like a bee/wasp sting and wasn't responsive to atropine like a black widow bite. So I figured it mighta been a scorpion.

Northern Scorpion
Very interesting, didn't know we had 'em here. The Wiki article mentions that the northernmost incidence is an island off the British coast, where they probably arrived with cargo.

In April we were up the hill a bit here in Clarkston, picked up an old wooden sign that had fallen off a fence... and discovered a big nest of ground termites under it. So they are surviving here despite the ground freezing down to probably about 5 feet last winter. We decided the adjacent property was not a good bet, having wood clear down to ground level...

Earlier today I saw wasps catching and eating flies. Mostly black with fancy pale tan markings, a little more compact than a yellowjacket. Anything that eats flies is good in my book. The mean ones are probably German yellowjackets, an invasive species.
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