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Old 04-16-2015, 11:47 AM
 
1,809 posts, read 3,758,724 times
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Having grown up near Monterey, I'd say it is a better place to retire. It is indeed more upscale in parts (although if you consider Seaside, it can be sketchy as well). There are probably more options for nice restaurants and such. However, I would prefer Santa Cruz for the following reasons:

1. Jobs - It is at least within commute distance to the Silicon Valley. Not a great commute, but still somewhat feasible. Monterey, on the other hand would probably be too far of a commute. There are not really many good jobs there, unless you happen to be connected to one of the Agriculture families in the Salinas Valley, are a professional where you can run your own business (Doctor, Lawyer, etc.) or have a corporate job which allows you to work remote.
2. Expensive - Both areas are pricey, but at least in SC, you may be able to afford it if you have a Silicon Valley job. In Monterey, its going to be a lot tougher, unless you are independently wealthy.
3. Weather - While this is debateable, I think SC has a lot nicer weather. It is south facing, so it receives less fog on average and less wind. It also tends to be warmer. Monterey is beautiful, but it is too chilly for me the vast majority of the time.

Quite honestly, if I were to live down in the Monterey Peninsula, I'd take Carmel Valley, due to the much better weather.
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Old 04-16-2015, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Monterey County, CA
5,480 posts, read 12,306,057 times
Reputation: 5808
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadwarrior101 View Post
Having grown up near Monterey, I'd say it is a better place to retire. It is indeed more upscale in parts (although if you consider Seaside, it can be sketchy as well). There are probably more options for nice restaurants and such. However, I would prefer Santa Cruz for the following reasons:

1. Jobs - It is at least within commute distance to the Silicon Valley. Not a great commute, but still somewhat feasible. Monterey, on the other hand would probably be too far of a commute. There are not really many good jobs there, unless you happen to be connected to one of the Agriculture families in the Salinas Valley, are a professional where you can run your own business (Doctor, Lawyer, etc.) or have a corporate job which allows you to work remote.
2. Expensive - Both areas are pricey, but at least in SC, you may be able to afford it if you have a Silicon Valley job. In Monterey, its going to be a lot tougher, unless you are independently wealthy.
3. Weather - While this is debateable, I think SC has a lot nicer weather. It is south facing, so it receives less fog on average and less wind. It also tends to be warmer. Monterey is beautiful, but it is too chilly for me the vast majority of the time.

Quite honestly, if I were to live down in the Monterey Peninsula, I'd take Carmel Valley, due to the much better weather.
Just a few things to think consider as some things may have changed since you've lived here. After living in Monterey for the past 7 years I've watched the whole area become progressively warmer, especially during the Summer months. I attribute much of that to overall climactic changes in the region including the current record breaking drought. In addition, since we moved from PG to Monterey's 'Sunbelt' the improvement is even more apparent. I've actually driven out of the fog on the way home more times than I can count. Even in Santa Cruz there are certain areas (microclimates) which get more fog just like we have here in PG and Marina. A friend of mine living in Santa Cruz actually moved to another part because of the fog being less severe there. Quite honestly, the weather is almost 'too perfect,' though I'm not complaining. I'm looking forward to more fog eventually, hopefully this Summer. It provides much needed moisture for the entire area and keeps things green.

Secondly, one of the biggest employers in the area is actually the DoD with the Naval Post Graduate School, Defense Language Institute and the Presidio of Monterey. There are quite a few military and civilian jobs available for many folks we know who live here. So that is another employer if someone has the relevant skillsets. Then the travel/tourism/service industry is large including all the events, golf tournaments, Pebble Beach Co., etc... There are also the research jobs related to marine life and oceanography. McGraw Hill is another significant employer. Then there are all the hospital/medical industry jobs. So it's definitely not limited to 'ag only' jobs. That's a misconception. Otherwise we wouldn't be able to live here nor would the majority of our friends and neighbors. For more info on the Monterey economy check out this post I made describing it in more detail: Monterey area - it's economy and history

I agree that Carmel Valley is very nice. But after living right on the coast our preference is to be nearer to the ocean. There's nothing like watching the sunset over the water or walking down to the beach with friends/family. Fortunately, there are a variety of options available depending on one's preferences including Carmel Valley and all the nice neighborhoods off of Hwy 68 like Laureles Grade, Corral De Tierra, etc...

Derek

Last edited by MtnSurfer; 04-16-2015 at 10:47 PM..
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Old 04-17-2015, 04:09 AM
 
Location: Oroville, California
3,183 posts, read 4,677,441 times
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Santa Cruz is fine - but the Monterey Peninsula is definitely nicer. The town is better looking (not to mention Pacific Grove and Carmel) and the location is more scenic. Santa Cruz has better, sunnier weather though.
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Old 04-18-2015, 12:11 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
14,330 posts, read 19,496,696 times
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I have never liked Santa Cruz. It always had a cheap/flea market/hippie/stoner/low-class/redneck/trash/empty-headed surfer vibe. The Boardwalk is overrated. No interest in that place. One of the most hollow places I have ever seen.

I prefer Monterey, and IMO the further you get to Carmel, the better.
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Old 04-23-2015, 01:54 AM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 N, 🌄W
11,038 posts, read 4,773,027 times
Reputation: 7060
Quote:
Originally Posted by LexusNexus View Post
I have never liked Santa Cruz. It always had a cheap/flea market/hippie/stoner/low-class/redneck/trash/empty-headed surfer vibe. The Boardwalk is overrated. No interest in that place. One of the most hollow places I have ever seen.

I prefer Monterey, and IMO the further you get to Carmel, the better.
I second this!
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Old 04-23-2015, 03:25 AM
 
60 posts, read 87,503 times
Reputation: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
I don't even go to Disneyland these days. Amusement parks are an old and outdated model that are apart of the old suburban sprawl model.

Huh? What?

Lurker here. I know nothing about Santa Cruz or Monterrey but I read this almost did a Guinness spit-take.


You don't go to Disneyland because of some wierd ideological conviction against the "outdated sprawl model"? What? People that radically hate "suburban sprawl" that much actually exist?

I can understand not going to Disneyland because you don't enjoy rides, you get motion sickness, it's over priced, you don't like walking etc. etc. but because of some wierd radical anti suburb ideology?

Again..huh?

For the record I live in a large city and grew up here, and like most people who grew up in a large city...I know that while the convenience is nice, suburbs offer things like space, privacy, affordability etc.

Are you one of those kids that grew up on a farm with dreams of "the big city" and have now adopted this radical ideology to reject your upbringing and rebel against mommy?

I hate hate hate social engineering types like you that think everyone should have to live packed up like a sardine to fulfill your "everything accept for what I like should be banned" agenda. I bet you that when you have children (if you have kids...you're probably one of those "the world is already overpopulated so the U.S. should have a one child policy" types) and you cannot afford $20k to shell out for private school, so you have to send your kid to a school where 75% of the kids receive free lunch, 35% cannot speak English, there are gang wars between the Latin Kings and the Black P Stones in the outdoor Recreation yard, and your son has come home bloody because he got beat up for being the only white kid in school (the other white kids' parents can afford the $20k per child at Catholic school) so you have to wait at the school every single day and walk your almost 14 year old the 8 blocks home so he isn't robbed for his Nike's or beat to a bloody pulp..then the suburbs won't be so outdated, eh? Because that situation I described is my situation and it's not that uncommon. And no, I don't live in a ghetto at all I live in a decent middle class neighborhood with a median income of $65k, but the thing about urban areas is that ghettoes and nice areas are separated by one or two streets so your kid has to go to school with the scum of the earth.


Listen, I understand why a young and single person or a childless couple or even a couple with one elementary aged student would find urban areas appealing. Lots of cool stuff within walking distance and stuff like that. But to say that suburban sprawl is "outdated" is uneducated and ludicrous. It appeals to a sub set of millennial a with college degrees, and no children. Just as many millennials live with their folks in the burbs as they do in cities (you can check that statistic) but to everyone other than that sub set of millennials (whom are usually annoying SJW hipsters, and who are disproportionately represented on this website because it's "city" data the same way gun-nuts are over represented on the NRA forum) suburban living isn't outdated, it's the future that they strive for. Most people who grew up in cities, either strive to live in the suburbs or they move to the most suburban part of the city. Look at South Chicagoland and Delco in the Philly area, the black % of these cities are dropping and soaring in the burbs because all of the black folks that grew up in the city are clamoring and falling over each other trying to get the hell out and have a better life. It's the same for poor white people in these cities who are doing the same crap, moving to Northwest Indiana (Chi) or South Jersey (Philly). If you talk to white or black New Yorkers with families they are all trying to move to Jersey or Long Island, or at least the most fringe/suburban parts of the city like Staten Island (Italians) or Riverdale (Jews) or SE Queens (Blacks), in LA the Jews raised in Fairfax and the Mexicans in East/Northeast LA, or the Armenians in East Hollywood are all trying to get to Sherman Oaks, Whittier, or Glendale respectively as soon as they have the means. You know why that is? because for most people in most demographics that aren't "WASPy hipsters raised in affluent communities" (WASPy comes in all colors btw, it's a pretentious state of mind that is ever-present in the urbane crowd) the suburbs aren't outdated, they are the keys to a better future and it's the crowded, old, filthy urban areas with bad schools that are outdated.

So, me (33) and my wife (30) and our 5 children have been saving our pennies like smart people so that now we can get in our truck and move to a nice sprawly "outdated" suburb.


This post has nothing to do with the topic at hand at all. I am sure that Santa Cruz and Monterrey are both very lovely and my dad who was a solider stationed at the Presidio back in the 70s told me that Monterrey Bay is the most gorgeous place on earth. However as a lurker I felt a compulsive need to counter such smug, pretentious, ignorance.
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Old 04-24-2015, 02:00 PM
 
426 posts, read 352,370 times
Reputation: 562
I agree, Monterey is classier than Santa Cruz. There are some sketchy looking characters around SC. We usually prefer day trips to Monterey/Carmel, but sometimes we go to SC since it is closer to San Jose.
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Old 04-26-2015, 12:01 AM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,861,000 times
Reputation: 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueeyes1982 View Post
Huh? What?

Lurker here. I know nothing about Santa Cruz or Monterrey but I read this almost did a Guinness spit-take.


You don't go to Disneyland because of some wierd ideological conviction against the "outdated sprawl model"? What? People that radically hate "suburban sprawl" that much actually exist?

I can understand not going to Disneyland because you don't enjoy rides, you get motion sickness, it's over priced, you don't like walking etc. etc. but because of some wierd radical anti suburb ideology?

Again..huh?

For the record I live in a large city and grew up here, and like most people who grew up in a large city...I know that while the convenience is nice, suburbs offer things like space, privacy, affordability etc.

Are you one of those kids that grew up on a farm with dreams of "the big city" and have now adopted this radical ideology to reject your upbringing and rebel against mommy?

I hate hate hate social engineering types like you that think everyone should have to live packed up like a sardine to fulfill your "everything accept for what I like should be banned" agenda. I bet you that when you have children (if you have kids...you're probably one of those "the world is already overpopulated so the U.S. should have a one child policy" types) and you cannot afford $20k to shell out for private school, so you have to send your kid to a school where 75% of the kids receive free lunch, 35% cannot speak English, there are gang wars between the Latin Kings and the Black P Stones in the outdoor Recreation yard, and your son has come home bloody because he got beat up for being the only white kid in school (the other white kids' parents can afford the $20k per child at Catholic school) so you have to wait at the school every single day and walk your almost 14 year old the 8 blocks home so he isn't robbed for his Nike's or beat to a bloody pulp..then the suburbs won't be so outdated, eh? Because that situation I described is my situation and it's not that uncommon. And no, I don't live in a ghetto at all I live in a decent middle class neighborhood with a median income of $65k, but the thing about urban areas is that ghettoes and nice areas are separated by one or two streets so your kid has to go to school with the scum of the earth.


Listen, I understand why a young and single person or a childless couple or even a couple with one elementary aged student would find urban areas appealing. Lots of cool stuff within walking distance and stuff like that. But to say that suburban sprawl is "outdated" is uneducated and ludicrous. It appeals to a sub set of millennial a with college degrees, and no children. Just as many millennials live with their folks in the burbs as they do in cities (you can check that statistic) but to everyone other than that sub set of millennials (whom are usually annoying SJW hipsters, and who are disproportionately represented on this website because it's "city" data the same way gun-nuts are over represented on the NRA forum) suburban living isn't outdated, it's the future that they strive for. Most people who grew up in cities, either strive to live in the suburbs or they move to the most suburban part of the city. Look at South Chicagoland and Delco in the Philly area, the black % of these cities are dropping and soaring in the burbs because all of the black folks that grew up in the city are clamoring and falling over each other trying to get the hell out and have a better life. It's the same for poor white people in these cities who are doing the same crap, moving to Northwest Indiana (Chi) or South Jersey (Philly). If you talk to white or black New Yorkers with families they are all trying to move to Jersey or Long Island, or at least the most fringe/suburban parts of the city like Staten Island (Italians) or Riverdale (Jews) or SE Queens (Blacks), in LA the Jews raised in Fairfax and the Mexicans in East/Northeast LA, or the Armenians in East Hollywood are all trying to get to Sherman Oaks, Whittier, or Glendale respectively as soon as they have the means. You know why that is? because for most people in most demographics that aren't "WASPy hipsters raised in affluent communities" (WASPy comes in all colors btw, it's a pretentious state of mind that is ever-present in the urbane crowd) the suburbs aren't outdated, they are the keys to a better future and it's the crowded, old, filthy urban areas with bad schools that are outdated.

So, me (33) and my wife (30) and our 5 children have been saving our pennies like smart people so that now we can get in our truck and move to a nice sprawly "outdated" suburb.


This post has nothing to do with the topic at hand at all. I am sure that Santa Cruz and Monterrey are both very lovely and my dad who was a solider stationed at the Presidio back in the 70s told me that Monterrey Bay is the most gorgeous place on earth. However as a lurker I felt a compulsive need to counter such smug, pretentious, ignorance.
I never said I don't go to Disneyland because of my idealogogies. I don't go because it's overcrowded meaning *can't think of a good word* long lines and it's pricey. I more so enjoy amusement parks where I don't have to wait in long lines to get into amusements like Universal Studios. Knotts Berry Farm was like this last I went. Universal Studios if I remember is less rides and more to look and see, but it's been a while since I was last there as well.

My point is that huge sprawling amusement parks could be left undeveloped creating less traffic or turned into a natural preserve or a zoo or aquarium that promotes the natural environment.

I didn't grow up on a farm, but did grow up in a rural small town. Yes I disliked it and for good reasons. Finding work was hard other than retail. It was boring and the community college wasn't that good. Thank God my parents and I moved during my college years.

Also when I have kids and purchase a home, it will be in a neighborhood where my child goes to safe and good public school. Which our small city has one neighborhood where that exists.
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Old 06-15-2015, 08:04 AM
 
Location: New Mexico via Ohio via Indiana
1,536 posts, read 1,326,545 times
Reputation: 2447
I like Santa Cruz. For the same reasons I like Venice, CA! The whole stoner/hippie/surfer thing. There is a lower class element to it, granted, which will undoubtedly bring some nighttime problems, but we don't want EVERYTHING to be Monterey or Carmel (though i like both those places also). And I have a soft spot for that whole old-school SC boardwalk/Arcade thing. It's like a bit of "Jersey Shore meets surfer dude" vibe.
Variety is the spice of life, folks! That's what makes California so terrific. Of course, I'm just coming in to visit.
You folks don't know how good you've got it, sometimes.
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Old 06-20-2015, 06:34 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,145 posts, read 2,829,527 times
Reputation: 4805
Both are TOURIST TOWNS.

It's just a bit more expensive in Monterey (no riff-raff....at least not yet) - than Santa Cruz.
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