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Old 02-01-2012, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Maryland
1,472 posts, read 2,340,745 times
Reputation: 1962

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Icecream - word to the wise, definitely buy used, not new. Many folks buy one and then discover its not for them. There are a fair number of very low miles scoots for sale. The PCX, being a 2011 model, is short on used units at the moment but that will change.

Used, you save freight/assembly/prep costs as well as benefit by depreciation and having somebody else pay for the initial
break-in service (usually around 600 miles). Scooters depreciate like a falling rock.

The Metro 50cc is a fine little scoot but you'll rapidly outgrow it. The PCX is also a much safer ride. The 50cc community will not be happy with that opinion, but you can bank on it. I started with a 50cc and outgrew it in months, plus your road speed options are much better with the 125.
Good luck.
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Old 02-01-2012, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
443 posts, read 428,126 times
Reputation: 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilgrim21784 View Post
Icecream - word to the wise, definitely buy used, not new. Many folks buy one and then discover its not for them. There are a fair number of very low miles scoots for sale. The PCX, being a 2011 model, is short on used units at the moment but that will change.

Used, you save freight/assembly/prep costs as well as benefit by depreciation and having somebody else pay for the initial
break-in service (usually around 600 miles). Scooters depreciate like a falling rock.

The Metro 50cc is a fine little scoot but you'll rapidly outgrow it. The PCX is also a much safer ride. The 50cc community will not be happy with that opinion, but you can bank on it. I started with a 50cc and outgrew it in months, plus your road speed options are much better with the 125.
Good luck.
oh definitely and thanks for the tip.

the reading i've done indicates you need to start small and work your way up so my plan would be to get a 50cc (to start) then upgrade to a 125, then a 250cc motorbike perhaps. all leapfrogging on used models.

and i'd listed new pricing to Grandpa Pipes because it's what i know - i'm not well versed enough to comment on used pricing due to variability. they still seem eminently cheap and practical for in-town commuting though.

do you have a scooter?

Last edited by icecreamsandwich; 02-01-2012 at 10:54 PM..
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Old 02-02-2012, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Maryland
1,472 posts, read 2,340,745 times
Reputation: 1962
Icecream "...do you have a scooter?"

Yep, I currently own 3 scooters (Piaggio MP3 400cc, Yamaha TMax 500cc & a Honda Reflex 250cc. (see my 1st post in this thread (#2 post).

Yes, if you're new to riding, starting small is the very best way to go. I did, with a 50cc SYM Mio. A consideration is that starting with a 50 is one can very, very quickly outgrow it. Secondly, purely my opinion, the 50s are a bit too under powered for safe riding in urban traffic. Many do so successfully and I'll probably get flamed for my opinion by the 50cc riders, but it is what it is.

I would strongly advise anyone to take the MSF course before venturing on public roads. In some states, you don't need a license to ride a 50cc. You can just buy one and take off.

The 50ccs usually have road speed limitations, for example in my state, Maryland, its 50MPH roads and below. Thats a bit problematic (and can get you in trouble) as a stock 50 usually top ends at around 30-35 MPH.

It is not a wise idea to be riding a scooter thats so underpowered that you can't keep up with traffic. Anything above the 50cc class requires a drivers test and motorcycle license in all states to my knowledge.

So, convoluted view - yes, starting with the 50 and moving up is the best way to go. Be very aware of the limitations of the 50's performance level and I suggest you view it as purely a trainer, short term ride. The larger scooters are much safer IMO.

There are quite a few people who stick with the 50 class ride way beyond their "newbie rider" stage and I can't fault their viewpoint. BUT, purely IMO - the optimal small scooter size is more on the 125 class unit than smaller 50s.

All by your lonesome, no traffic - a 50 may be fine. BUT - if (actually when) you need umph to get out of some idiot car driver's way - larger/more powerful scooters will save your life.

A lot of that opinion is predicated on where (road speeds, traffic density, terrain (hills can be a real problem for 50s with any substantial weighted rider) and related factors that should define one's choice.
Without knowing your specifics I can't offer any better information/opinions.
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Old 02-03-2012, 04:53 AM
 
Location: Northern NJ/Amagansett, NY
4,174 posts, read 4,857,110 times
Reputation: 2954
If I were you, I would start at 125 or 150. The overall size of the scooter isn't much different than a 50cc, and the extra power can come in very handy. It is no easier to learn on a 50cc scooter than a 150cc scooter. Plus, that will be one less time you have to hassle with selling it and buying a new one.
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Old 02-03-2012, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Maryland
1,472 posts, read 2,340,745 times
Reputation: 1962
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnesthesiaMD View Post
If I were you, I would start at 125 or 150. The overall size of the scooter isn't much different than a 50cc, and the extra power can come in very handy. It is no easier to learn on a 50cc scooter than a 150cc scooter. Plus, that will be one less time you have to hassle with selling it and buying a new one.
Well said.
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Old 02-03-2012, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY
1,255 posts, read 636,110 times
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That and depending on your wieght, a 125 or 150 is probablly the only thing that'll carry you. I rode a 50cc once and I couldve out ran it on a bike.
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Old 06-12-2012, 07:58 AM
 
9,109 posts, read 12,619,324 times
Reputation: 4044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilgrim21784 View Post
Icecream "...do you have a scooter?"

Yep, I currently own 3 scooters (Piaggio MP3 400cc, Yamaha TMax 500cc & a Honda Reflex 250cc. (see my 1st post in this thread (#2 post).

Yes, if you're new to riding, starting small is the very best way to go. I did, with a 50cc SYM Mio. A consideration is that starting with a 50 is one can very, very quickly outgrow it. Secondly, purely my opinion, the 50s are a bit too under powered for safe riding in urban traffic. Many do so successfully and I'll probably get flamed for my opinion by the 50cc riders, but it is what it is.

I would strongly advise anyone to take the MSF course before venturing on public roads. In some states, you don't need a license to ride a 50cc. You can just buy one and take off.

The 50ccs usually have road speed limitations, for example in my state, Maryland, its 50MPH roads and below. Thats a bit problematic (and can get you in trouble) as a stock 50 usually top ends at around 30-35 MPH.

It is not a wise idea to be riding a scooter thats so underpowered that you can't keep up with traffic. Anything above the 50cc class requires a drivers test and motorcycle license in all states to my knowledge.

So, convoluted view - yes, starting with the 50 and moving up is the best way to go. Be very aware of the limitations of the 50's performance level and I suggest you view it as purely a trainer, short term ride. The larger scooters are much safer IMO.

There are quite a few people who stick with the 50 class ride way beyond their "newbie rider" stage and I can't fault their viewpoint. BUT, purely IMO - the optimal small scooter size is more on the 125 class unit than smaller 50s.

All by your lonesome, no traffic - a 50 may be fine. BUT - if (actually when) you need umph to get out of some idiot car driver's way - larger/more powerful scooters will save your life.

A lot of that opinion is predicated on where (road speeds, traffic density, terrain (hills can be a real problem for 50s with any substantial weighted rider) and related factors that should define one's choice.
Without knowing your specifics I can't offer any better information/opinions.
Im taking the dmv course in 3 weeks. Is the mp3 a good starter scooter? I know i will outgrow a 50cc quickly.
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Old 06-15-2012, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Maryland
1,472 posts, read 2,340,745 times
Reputation: 1962
Quote:
Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
Im taking the dmv course in 3 weeks. Is the mp3 a good starter scooter? I know i will outgrow a 50cc quickly.
My apology for the delayed response, we've been traveling quite a bit and I missed your question in a timely manor. My answer to your question is ABSOLUTELY NO UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES! The smallest MP3, the 250, is a heavy and quirky machine. It is, IMO, a very bad choice as a starter unit (though very fine for its intended application with an experienced rider).

I have two adult daughters who are the delight of my life - if they proposed to start with an MP3, I would destroy their vehicles before I would allow them to venture onto the road (and beat their SO or husband severely for not preventing such action.)

I would much prefer that you start with an 80/125/150cc unit to get your initial riding smarts established if you don't go with a 50cc trainer and then upgrade. The MP3s are NOT for inexperienced riders - please don't go there.

Understand that there is a severe learning curve to riding. Violate a cautious and respectful approach to the subject and you may well be a bloodspot. JMHO

Last edited by Pilgrim21784; 06-15-2012 at 03:51 PM..
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Old 06-16-2012, 12:11 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,657 posts, read 5,027,769 times
Reputation: 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilgrim21784 View Post

I would much prefer that you start with an 80/125/150cc unit to get your initial riding smarts established if you don't go with a 50cc trainer and then upgrade. The MP3s are NOT for inexperienced riders - please don't go there.

Understand that there is a severe learning curve to riding. Violate a cautious and respectful approach to the subject and you may well be a bloodspot. JMHO
And buy used. Your learning curve might be slow or aggressive (we started on 80s and moved up to 250s within a few months) but if you buy a new scooter at a dealer, it will depreciate quickly and you'll be hard pressed to get a good deal if you want to trade it in and move up. A simple google search on "xx scooter in Y state" will surely bring up some decent deals. I know a lot of folks panicked when gas prices started to go into orbit (our state actually ran out of gas in the months after Katrina) and people flocked to scooters. Once we began to accept high gas prices as a permanent condition, and those scooter riders got a taste of dealing with helmet hair, little storage, and getting stuck in sudden downpours, the scooters went to the back of the garage. If they have really low mileage, but are 3 or 4 years old, definitely bargain on the price unless the seller can prove that they've taken it to the shop and had it checked out.

Automatics can have a faster learning season because of the simple twist 'n go configuration, but there are still things common to all two-wheelers that you need to be well-versed about before moving up to a more powerful bike.
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Old 07-13-2012, 12:40 AM
 
552 posts, read 658,719 times
Reputation: 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by pilgrim21784 View Post
my apology for the delayed response, we've been traveling quite a bit and i missed your question in a timely manor. My answer to your question is absolutely no under any circumstances! the smallest mp3, the 250, is a heavy and quirky machine. It is, imo, a very bad choice as a starter unit (though very fine for its intended application with an experienced rider).

I have two adult daughters who are the delight of my life - if they proposed to start with an mp3, i would destroy their vehicles before i would allow them to venture onto the road (and beat their so or husband severely for not preventing such action.)

i would much prefer that you start with an 80/125/150cc unit to get your initial riding smarts established if you don't go with a 50cc trainer and then upgrade. The mp3s are not for inexperienced riders - please don't go there.

understand that there is a severe learning curve to riding. Violate a cautious and respectful approach to the subject and you may well be a bloodspot. Jmho
+1
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