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Old 06-07-2011, 10:11 AM
 
2,179 posts, read 2,811,905 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coolhand68 View Post
There was something gritty and real about the movies of the mid to late 60's and 70's, and Scarecrow was a classic example. Movies back then didn't hold back. They weren't afraid to show tragedy and deal with topics that weren't so PC. They documented characters you just don't see walking around any longer. They also didn't spell everything out for you, they didn't dumb down to the audience all the time, which is what I enjoyed so much about The Swimmer. Lot's of metaphors and use of scale and environment to show his gradual breakdown.
Yeah, I think today, and not just in movies, they're so afraid of offending somebody that the edges get cut off all the sides and they end up offending everybody who doesn't appreciate being patronized. They say art is supposed to imitate life, but much of today's commercial art only imitates a life we wish we were perfect enough to lead.
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Old 06-07-2011, 10:14 AM
 
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Yeah, poletop, one man's obscure is another man's common fair. Of the ones you posted I think I saw less than half. Here's one that's obscure by my standards anyway.



YouTube - ‪Kitten with a Whip (Douglas Heyes 1964) Ann-Margret John Forsythe‬‏
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Old 06-07-2011, 11:11 AM
 
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A few more that I'd think most people here haven't seen..

Career, with Tony Franciosa and Dean Martin


A Raisin in the Sun (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia




YouTube - ‪The Big Sky 1952 Trailer‬‏


And here's another Kirk Douglas flick that I think most have not seen. Don't know why though-- this is a great one. A Greek Tragedy set in a NYC police precinct. And what better tragic hero than Douglas, as an arrogant, unforgiving detective and husband to the beautiful Eleanor Parker who as it turns out, has a past..

So great that we can watch many of these in their entirety on youtube..


YouTube - ‪Detective Story - William Wyler Part 1 (1951).avi‬‏
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Old 06-07-2011, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,245,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Humble View Post
Don't know Warlock, but that's a great cast. Montgomery Clift is a guy that a lot of people don't know so well. He died pretty young. When they asked Robert DeNiro who his favorite actors were, maybe over ten years ago now, he mentioned Brando of course, James Dean, and this guy. I'll never forget his scene in From Here To Eternity, playing taps for his buddy Maggio. He made a good movie with one of Hollywood's great beauties, another actor that died young, Lee Remick.

Wild River, directed by Elia (On the Waterfront) Kazan

Wild River (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wow, didn't realize LR died young (at age 55). I loved her in Anatomy of a Murder.

MC was a very talented actor; my favorite film of his is A Place in the Sun with a young Liz Taylor. He really was a very talented actor yet had such a tragic life RIP.

To Poletop: I just saw The Devil and Daniel Webster: you're right, great film!
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Old 06-07-2011, 10:48 PM
 
1,248 posts, read 1,832,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
Wow, didn't realize LR died young (at age 55). I loved her in Anatomy of a Murder.

MC was a very talented actor; my favorite film of his is A Place in the Sun with a young Liz Taylor. He really was a very talented actor yet had such a tragic life RIP.

To Poletop: I just saw The Devil and Daniel Webster: you're right, great film!
It was great fun, right? Did you know the great Thomas Mitchell was originally cast as Daniel Webster but left early due to an injury? His long distant shots are apparently still in the finished project.


I just saw a classic film noir by the genius Fritz Lang called Scarlet Street. It is public domain now and features the great Edward G. Robinson. The ending is very dark and rather scary, even for a 1940s film noir. I do not want to give it away, you have to see it for yourself if you wish:


YouTube - ‪Scarlet Street‬‏


Trivia: Art is a key plot point in the film and Robinson in real life was well-known for his collection of paintings and his support of the fine arts.
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Old 06-07-2011, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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Lone Star. . . .one of the very best, little known movies of all time!
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Old 06-07-2011, 11:49 PM
 
1,248 posts, read 1,832,801 times
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Some more film noir suggestions:


The Big Combo, great shadowy hardboiled crime film:



YouTube - ‪The Big Combo‬‏


Suddenly. Perhaps the first film about assassins targeting the President...Sinatra's only role as a villain and he makes it memorable. Some of the minor actors are hokey and it is a bit corny at times but not bad for a taut little thriller in a small town.


YouTube - ‪Suddenly (1954) FULL MOVIE‬‏

Where the Sidewalk Ends, "Laura" co-stars Dana Andrews and Gene Tierney reunite with director Otto Preminger in this tangled web of a police detective known for his brutality who gets involved with an accidental murder while tracking down street thugs. He battles the spectre of his father's gangster past, his feelings and romance for a pretty widow, and a guilty conscience. Crime and Punishment meets the Big Apple.

Kiss Me Deadly is a 1950s noir about a brutal and raw PI in LA named Mike Hammer who picks up a pretty hitchhiker who actually recently escaped from a mental institution and soon torturous hitmen and the FBI are after Hammer and his secretary while a mysterious item is coveted.


YouTube - ‪KISS ME DEADLY Trailer‬‏

Rififi is the father of all heist films, yet may be less known by Americans due to the French tongue. Rififi is all you could want from a heist film with French wiseguys in Paris scheming to rob priceless jewels, yet their own personal vices may be the death of them.

Nightclub sequence from "Rififi"


YouTube - ‪Rififi - song sequence from movie‬‏
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Old 06-07-2011, 11:50 PM
 
1,248 posts, read 1,832,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Humble View Post
Yeah, poletop, one man's obscure is another man's common fair. Of the ones you posted I think I saw less than half. Here's one that's obscure by my standards anyway.



YouTube - ‪Kitten with a Whip (Douglas Heyes 1964) Ann-Margret John Forsythe‬‏


haha, I remember this one. What an infamous title, perhaps the first chixploitation?
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Old 06-08-2011, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Back in the gym...Yo Adrian!
9,371 posts, read 17,488,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poletop1 View Post
Suddenly. Perhaps the first film about assassins targeting the President...Sinatra's only role as a villain and he makes it memorable. Some of the minor actors are hokey and it is a bit corny at times but not bad for a taut little thriller in a small town.
Good call on Suddenly. One of my favorite Sinatra performances. I also liked Johnny Concho and Man with the Golden Arm. You can really see Sinatra's acting chops shine through in these performances.
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Old 06-08-2011, 10:37 AM
 
Location: West Texas
960 posts, read 1,819,111 times
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A few I like are

Twelve Angry Men starring Henry Fonda - 1957

To Kill a Mockingbird starring Gregory Peck - 1962

Road To Morocco starring Bing Crosby and Bob Hope - 1942 (perhaps the best of the "Road show" movies they made)

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington starring Jimmy Stewart - 1939

The Mark of Zorro starring Tyrone Power - 1940
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