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Old 09-06-2011, 12:49 PM
 
Location: on an island
13,374 posts, read 40,153,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 30STM View Post
many african americans i know are offended by this and are dissing it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
Could you explain why?
I too would be curious to know how they feel. I haven't seen the movie yet, might wait for the rentals, not sure.

I did not actively dislike the book, but it sure didn't wow me. I just could not warm up to the characters, especially Skeeter. The subject was (is!) important, but the narrative felt like a paint-by-numbers story.

Coretta Scott King admired this book--a *true* story that took place not far from where I now live. I would love to see a movie made out of it.
Praying for Sheetrock
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Old 09-06-2011, 03:18 PM
 
Location: not where you are
7,920 posts, read 7,265,062 times
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As a Black woman, let me say, I can possibly understand some of the negative reactions to the film/book. The dialogue, the lack of positive black male role models, rarely a black person being described as being physically lovely/beautiful in anyway, just mostly all mammies. But, ya know, that was how the domestics spoke in the south. I've read books that were written with whites as the main characters speaking in similar dialect and was just as put off at times. Sometimes, I'm even put off by my own writing, but, hey, I'm from nuyark, whadaywant.

As I mentioned in another thread, by the time I reached page 80 or so, I slammed the book down and thought I was through with it. I just couldn't take anymore of of the dialect or the way in which the maids were being charactirised, even if it seemed accurate. In addition, there were so many old wounds and buried memories being reopened in my head that I just had enough. Yet, my reasonable side kicked in and I couldn't get the darn book out of my mind, so, I picked up the book and reread the jacket, which gave me new encouragement to continue reading. I ended up very much enjoying the book. There were numerous times, I kept trying to figure out how this woman could so authentically, what I felt, capture the rhythm of the voices of these Black women of that time. To me she did a great job of adopting and putting their spirit down on paper.

I empathise with the feelings of those that have misgivings about the book and movie, but I also, feel the woman was writing the book with the best of intentions, not as another savior to the black people or any such thing, just someone that cared about the person that raised her. I do hope my feelings are correct. I will say the movie didn't do the book justice. Sorry but for me they were different animals.

From reading reviews of people that didn't care for the book and or movie on the other side of the color wheel, there were almost as many complaints. So we all get to complain equally.


Some great links to a presentation by the author and and African America group giving recognition to the author of THE HELP no mistaking that not all think the book slights the AA community.



Tower Theatre Part 4 - A Novel Idea 2010 - Kathryn Stockett - YouTube



Tower Theatre Part 2 - A Novel Idea 2010 - Kathryn Stockett - YouTube


PS, it was strange being the only one of my kind sitting in the theater watching the movie. Once the film was over, I felt like I should jump up and give a speech the way people looked at me. probably was just my imagination. But people don't stare at the only one or two people of color in the theater, makes us feel like we're on the menu. Someone walked over to my table and asked me if I was the entertainment at the restuarant I attended the night before, me, as usual being the only one of person of color. sheese. Well ya said yous wanted to know how we felt, just thought I'd add that in for good measure.

Last edited by TRosa; 09-06-2011 at 03:36 PM..
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Old 09-07-2011, 04:12 PM
 
Location: So Ca
13,865 posts, read 13,539,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRosa View Post
it was strange being the only one of my kind sitting in the theater watching the movie.
That's interesting. When I saw it, over half the theater audience was black. The theater was packed, although most of us were women.
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Old 09-07-2011, 05:20 PM
 
Location: CITY OF ANGELS AND CONSTANT DANGER
5,409 posts, read 11,068,069 times
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i think some people arent warming up to the book because of the authors whiteness and because its the cliched "white woman saviour" story. think dangerous minds. think the blind side. what they mis of course is that this is deeper than that. the story isnt about skeeter trying to save them (something adressed in the movie), but its about having the guts to expose a side to life (and history) that is hidden.
i think its a good book and all my friends who dont want to see it for the above reasons have been pestered by me.
when all else fails i say "go see it for the acting. viola davis and octavia were superb, besides would you rather see 'the help' or some tyler perry bafoonery".
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Old 09-08-2011, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Westchester County
1,096 posts, read 1,342,289 times
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Ah yes. Another movie which reminds us colored folk our place in the south during the 1960's. No positive black male role models (Other than those civil rights troublemakers), and the women were doing domestic work for white families. To some people this movie is a reminder of a more innocent "happier" time in America where a white person could use the "N" word without penalty, when most places in the South were segregated and whites didn't have to associate with blacks because there were laws that prevented that sort of thing. Thats what America was all about. Treating returning black WWII veterans (who really didn't do much during the war I.E. Tuskegee Airmen) like second class citizens only to recognize them years later (they just forgot). Well at least African American's can look forward to more movies from "America's Minstrel" movie maker Tyler Perry!!
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Old 09-09-2011, 11:58 AM
 
Location: CITY OF ANGELS AND CONSTANT DANGER
5,409 posts, read 11,068,069 times
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any movie that deals with this part of our history will have to deal with the reality of prejudice and racism as it existed then (de jure and de facto). even movies like the great debaters or pride remind us of what was black folks place. thats just history. if they want to make a movie about male positive role models then they would do that (see the two movies mentioned). this is a movie about women, black women, and what they endured in Jackson at this time in history. thats it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SKP440 View Post
Ah yes. Another movie which reminds us colored folk our place in the south during the 1960's. No positive black male role models (Other than those civil rights troublemakers), and the women were doing domestic work for white families. To some people this movie is a reminder of a more innocent "happier" time in America where a white person could use the "N" word without penalty, when most places in the South were segregated and whites didn't have to associate with blacks because there were laws that prevented that sort of thing. Thats what America was all about. Treating returning black WWII veterans (who really didn't do much during the war I.E. Tuskegee Airmen) like second class citizens only to recognize them years later (they just forgot). Well at least African American's can look forward to more movies from "America's Minstrel" movie maker Tyler Perry!!
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Old 09-09-2011, 12:11 PM
 
274 posts, read 493,363 times
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I enjoyed the movie, but wish it had the positive end that the book had, Abilene just walking home from being fired, was not the ending I wanted. One thing that I thought was interesting in the book, is how much responsibility the women had for the way things were/are. It was made clear to me that the way the woman said something to her husband caused many of the reactions they had. In the book, after the stories were published and some of the women realized or paid attention to their attitudes the men changed too. It plays to how a woman may have said "he looked at me." The tone would make all the differences in the reaction that the man would have in many cases. I found it interesting myself.
Back to Abilene her life and the rest of the maids had some more positive experiences after everyone knew about the book
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Old 09-09-2011, 12:31 PM
 
274 posts, read 493,363 times
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Trosa, I did not finish my thoughts, when I saw the movie it was full and equal black/white. I found myself at the end of the movie trying to gauge a reaction from the blacks there. I felt like their feelings needed to be respected. I did talk to some of the ladies and ask them if they had read the book. Some had not and I told them about the more positive ending to the book, I overheard them say as I left, that they needed to get the book and read it.
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Old 09-09-2011, 03:47 PM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,790,850 times
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Has there ever been a movie about the Tuskegee Airmen? Now THAT would be a great movie; the true stories usually make the BEST movies.
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Old 09-09-2011, 04:41 PM
 
Location: not where you are
7,920 posts, read 7,265,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldraider View Post
Trosa, I did not finish my thoughts, when I saw the movie it was full and equal black/white. I found myself at the end of the movie trying to gauge a reaction from the blacks there. I felt like their feelings needed to be respected. I did talk to some of the ladies and ask them if they had read the book. Some had not and I told them about the more positive ending to the book, I overheard them say as I left, that they needed to get the book and read it.


I figured that was why most of the people that looked in my direction were doing so, but, it interrupted my ugly cry. I couldn't finish my good cry at the end of the movie, not just because of the other audience members, but also because of my annoying movie companion. I appreciate that all kinds of emotions were evoked from the general audience before, during, and after the movie ended. People reacted in just about all the same places just as I did to the injustices, funny, endearing moments as I did and believe me, they had no idea that a big chocolate covered cupcake (that would be me ), was sitting amongst them least not till the lights came on in the room.

I didn't expect there to be many people with similar pigmentation to myself in my viewing audience considering the location of the theater where I live, so, that wasn't really much of a suprise. I just didn't realize how strange it would feel, when going to see a movie of this nature and not seeing one single other brown person. As far as why not suprised, I guess I should have made it clear that even though I'm originally from NY, I presently reside in Sarasota Fl about 2 or so miles south of Siesta Key Beach. So yes, I certainly knew, it would be a prodominately non Black audience. But DANG! It never used to bother me, but lately people have been making an issue of it so I'm just more aware sometimes.

The other interesting, but nice thing was that the audience seemed to be nearly 50/50 male-female. I'm certain the women pulled the men in. One of my physical therapist had seen a copy of the book in my hand, he was all excited and then ask, "Oh how do you like the book?" He continued with "I'm planning to go see the movie on the weekend." Later during our session, I teased him and asked, "So who is the gal you're trying to impress, he laughed and fessed up that his lady friend was dragging him to see it. I just cracked up laughing.

I wasn't crazy about the ending either, but, it was a few hairs more realistic than what took place in the book. I do think one needs to have read the book to have a better appreciation of the story. I doubt I'll ever view another movie that's been adapted from a book of a dramatic nature; I've rarely ever been fully satisfied with the results.

Last edited by TRosa; 09-09-2011 at 04:53 PM..
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