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Old 08-31-2011, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Fairfax, VA
3,829 posts, read 2,656,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alley01 View Post
I ran into someone that didn't know where Zip a Dee Doo Dah came from and was a bit shocked. I remember watching "Song of the South" in grade school and of course if you go on Splash Mountain at a Disney Park, you get a refresher a very subtle one). But, it does make me sad that Disney will not release this movie again. As much as I can remember, I really liked the film. I understand that some are offended by it, but really it is history...we live in a society that was horribly racist, much of the United States had slavery amongst other things that we aren't proud of. But, the stories are real and I don't understand how it is ever okay to censor a movie being shown because we don't want to remember the history of the days, the stereotypes, etc. that were involved in the original stories.

Anyone else wish that this movie would come back at some point? I really hope that Disney changes its mind in the future.

What is really sad is that the Disney Channel refuses to broadcast any of the orginal programming from the "Worderful World Of Disney" TV program that we all watched every week including the original "Mickey Mouse Club".
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Old 08-31-2011, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Brambleton, VA
2,187 posts, read 6,578,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LetsRock View Post
What is really sad is that the Disney Channel refuses to broadcast any of the orginal programming from the "Worderful World Of Disney" TV program that we all watched every week including the original "Mickey Mouse Club".
I bet they will when there is an anniversary. But, they have so many different shows to balance that I don't know where they would find the time. I can't even keep track of how many shows there are! Maybe Disney will add another channel at some point. I am a member of D23 but I don't know if it is really that popular to create that demand. I just think that they didn't think through the benefits of membership enough. I would run it a lot differently and give members the option to purchase a copy of Song of the South!
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Old 08-31-2011, 02:02 PM
 
120 posts, read 277,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
Well, that's not what a lot of African Americans have said about the film. Moreover, I would hardly call slavery a "bad situation."

While there are some positive messages to be gleaned from the Uncle Remus tales, most African Americans find the film objectionable b/c it shows African American slaves happily going about their chores as slaves and living harmoniously beside their benevolent, white slave owners, who are nothing but loving and kind. In short, it depicts none of the actual horrors of slavery but, rather, depicts it as a happy period for African Americans. Hence, the film doesn't confront the U.S.'s sordid past but, rather, romanticizes it, depicting slavery as a benign institution in which everyone lived happy lives in harmony with one another, which is why many African Americans find it objectionable.
To each his own. I can distinguish the difference between a Disney movie and real life. It's a childrens movie, not a documentary on slavery.
Folks were upset when Phantom Menace came out because they believed Jar Jar Binks was mocking mentally challenged people. Give me a break.
If movies were banned on the basis that it hurt someones feelings there wouldn't be any. Movies do not = reality.
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Old 08-31-2011, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,245,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by come_back_kid View Post
To each his own. I can distinguish the difference between a Disney movie and real life. It's a childrens movie, not a documentary on slavery.
Folks were upset when Phantom Menace came out because they believed Jar Jar Binks was mocking mentally challenged people. Give me a break.
If movies were banned on the basis that it hurt someones feelings there wouldn't be any. Movies do not = reality.
This is precisely the problem: the film depicts a real event unrealistically, a real, horrific era in U.S. history as a happy time for African Americans. It would be completely different if it didn't mix history and fiction; then, it would not be so controversial. It really isn't the same as the JarJar analogy, which is a completely fictional character in a completely fictional time.

But whenever a film is historically inaccurate about an issue such as slavery, and then goes so far as to depict it as a happy era/institution, then people--especially those whose ancestors were abused, tortured, maimed and killed--are going to have a problem with it, and rightfully so, in much the same way that the Jewish population would be in an uproar if someone depicted the Holocaust inaccurately as not such bad time for Jews.

The issue is not as simple as films not equaling reality.
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Old 08-31-2011, 10:06 PM
 
120 posts, read 277,292 times
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Would you find it surprising that the gentleman who played Uncle Remus, James Baskett, and a black animator who worked at Disney in the 40's and 50's, Mr. Floyd Norman, are in favor of releasing the movie ? Disney releases Song of the South?: controversial movie may get DVD release | Suite101.com
Read also the comments at the bottom.
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Old 09-01-2011, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Brambleton, VA
2,187 posts, read 6,578,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by come_back_kid View Post
Would you find it surprising that the gentleman who played Uncle Remus, James Baskett, and a black animator who worked at Disney in the 40's and 50's, Mr. Floyd Norman, are in favor of releasing the movie ? Disney releases Song of the South?: controversial movie may get DVD release | Suite101.com
Read also the comments at the bottom.
Thanks for posting that! It was from 2007 so I hope that another push happens soon.

Quote:
This is precisely the problem: the film depicts a real event unrealistically, a real, horrific era in U.S. history as a happy time for African Americans. It would be completely different if it didn't mix history and fiction; then, it would not be so controversial. It really isn't the same as the JarJar analogy, which is a completely fictional character in a completely fictional time.

But whenever a film is historically inaccurate about an issue such as slavery, and then goes so far as to depict it as a happy era/institution, then people--especially those whose ancestors were abused, tortured, maimed and killed--are going to have a problem with it, and rightfully so, in much the same way that the Jewish population would be in an uproar if someone depicted the Holocaust inaccurately as not such bad time for Jews.

The issue is not as simple as films not equaling reality.
Seriously? What cartoons portray things 100% realistically? Wiley Coyote is squashed, blown up, etc. and yet comes back time after time and I am pretty sure that isn't realistic. Mr. Magoo is blind and manages to not get himself killed when if we were in his situation in real life, we wouldn't last 10 minutes. Entertainment is Entertainment. Besides, this movie was not a documentary, it is a live action, cartoon combination. I can see your point if it is marketed as a documentary but no Disney Cartoon has ever been. That is what their Nature Series is for.

Although there are dark periods in U.S. History, I don't see how it is possible that there weren't any happy slaves...ones that laughed with their families, sang, etc. my understanding from reading quite a few books on the subject in college was that some slave owners actually treated their slaves well, and they were like family. After all, many were granted their freedom by their slave owners. Sometimes we forget that even though an event affected many people, that they are still individuals and don't always fit into the majority.

No one is forced to see this movie...I am pretty sure that if you don't want to see it, you don't have to!
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Old 09-01-2011, 08:39 AM
 
861 posts, read 1,057,600 times
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How racist can you guys be? So if this movie makes you feel so good, but blacks so bad it's ok? Wow! Racism towards blacks still exist today, and it is very apparent within this thread. Disney retired the movie for a reason, it's flat out racist. Happy slaves!?! "It's from my childhood!", you are so ignorant!
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Old 09-01-2011, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Maine
15,072 posts, read 19,718,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alley01 View Post
Seriously? What cartoons portray things 100% realistically? Wiley Coyote is squashed, blown up, etc. and yet comes back time after time and I am pretty sure that isn't realistic.
You honestly don't see the difference between Uncle Remus and Wylie Coyote?
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Old 09-01-2011, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,245,548 times
Reputation: 4867
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alley01 View Post
Thanks for posting that! It was from 2007 so I hope that another push happens soon.



Seriously? What cartoons portray things 100% realistically? Wiley Coyote is squashed, blown up, etc. and yet comes back time after time and I am pretty sure that isn't realistic. Mr. Magoo is blind and manages to not get himself killed when if we were in his situation in real life, we wouldn't last 10 minutes. Entertainment is Entertainment. Besides, this movie was not a documentary, it is a live action, cartoon combination. I can see your point if it is marketed as a documentary but no Disney Cartoon has ever been. That is what their Nature Series is for.

Although there are dark periods in U.S. History, I don't see how it is possible that there weren't any happy slaves...ones that laughed with their families, sang, etc. my understanding from reading quite a few books on the subject in college was that some slave owners actually treated their slaves well, and they were like family. After all, many were granted their freedom by their slave owners. Sometimes we forget that even though an event affected many people, that they are still individuals and don't always fit into the majority.

No one is forced to see this movie...I am pretty sure that if you don't want to see it, you don't have to!
"Happy slaves"? Are you serious?! I'm sure that there were happy slaves and benevolant slave owners just as there were compassionate Nazis and happy Jews during the Holocaust. However, a film that depicts such people as the norm is problematic, especially when the majority of people involoved were victims of genocide. I can definitely understand why those whose ancestors suffered would be extremely offended by any film that depicts the genocide that killed their relatives inaccurately as "not so bad."

Moreover, Song of the South is not an attempt by Disney to express the story of the oft-ignored minority population of slaves that were happy during slavery.

Furthermore, just b/c this film is a cartoon does not allow it such irresponsible artistic liberties with history. Anytime any film et al. inaccurately depicts real genocide as "not so bad," it is going to controversial. Mr. Magoo and Wiley Coyote are not symbolic of people who were victims of genocide; Uncle Remus and his fellow slaves are.

Lastly, while films are obviously not reality, it is naive to state that they do not have any basis in reality, do not reflect a society's cultural values and do not influence people. I think that this is the real issue that many people have with the film: it sends the message, primarily to children, that slavery wasn't such a bad way of life.

If you can't understand why anyone, especially African Americans, would be extremely offended by that, then I think that you need to attend some kind of cultural sensitivity seminar. And this isn't just about choosing not to see the film--it flat out promotes racism and cultural insensitivity, which affects the lives of real people and how they are treated by others.
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Old 09-01-2011, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Brambleton, VA
2,187 posts, read 6,578,056 times
Reputation: 2157
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
"Happy slaves"? Are you serious?! I'm sure that there were happy slaves and benevolant slave owners just as there were compassionate Nazis and happy Jews during the Holocaust. However, a film that depicts such people as the norm is problematic, especially when the majority of people involoved were victims of genocide. I can definitely understand why those whose ancestors suffered would be extremely offended by any film that depicts the genocide that killed their relatives inaccurately as "not so bad."

Moreover, Song of the South is not an attempt by Disney to express the story of the oft-ignored minority population of slaves that were happy during slavery.

Furthermore, just b/c this film is a cartoon does not allow it such irresponsible artistic liberties with history. Anytime any film et al. inaccurately depicts real genocide as "not so bad," it is going to controversial. Mr. Magoo and Wiley Coyote are not symbolic of people who were victims of genocide; Uncle Remus and his fellow slaves are.

Lastly, while films are obviously not reality, it is naive to state that they do not have any basis in reality, do not reflect a society's cultural values and do not influence people. I think that this is the real issue that many people have with the film: it sends the message, primarily to children, that slavery wasn't such a bad way of life.

If you can't understand why anyone, especially African Americans, would be extremely offended by that, then I think that you need to attend some kind of cultural sensitivity seminar. And this isn't just about choosing not to see the film--it flat out promotes racism and cultural insensitivity, which affects the lives of real people and how they are treated by others.
That's it - I am absolutely a racist and insensitive to cultures which is why I must want to see the movie released again! Interesting that you would make an assumption as to what race I am, or that of my family. Because if you knew, you wouldn't make such assumptions because they are impossible. Please don't attack me because you don't like my viewpoint.

Now, if we can just get back to the topic...and stop all these accusations I would really appreciate it. Because some people do like the movie, want to see it released again and appreciate it as being a big part of Disney history.
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