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Old 09-07-2011, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,262,802 times
Reputation: 4878

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Quote:
Originally Posted by English Dave View Post
This is a tough one. I like The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly a lot. But, I think the
greatest western is The Searchers. It' John Wayne and John Ford's greatest work
I think. John Ford kept going back to Monument Valley over many years making
westerns, this is the best. Beautifully shot in VistaVision widescreen, just lovely to look
at. I was always curious about the last scene where John Wayne grabs his arm with his
other hand, walks away, and the house door closes. When I watched the documentary
extra on the DVD, it explained it was a tribute to Harry Carey, a cowboy star in films when
Wayne was a boy. Harry Carey's widow and son were watching behind the camera as this
tribute was paid. A very nice touch I thought.
My favorite as well.

There is some interesting analysis about Ethan's relationship with Martha, his brother's wife who is killed in the beginning of the film. The analysis posits the possibility that Ethan Edwards is driven to search for Debbie b/c she is really his daughter--the result of an extra-marital affair he had with Martha, which explains some of the emotional baggage the character seems to carry throughout the film.

I never knew about the tribute to Harry Carey, that's very interesting. The ending is one of my favorite parts of the film The only other ending that comes as close to being so good is that of Unforgiven.
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:04 AM
 
62 posts, read 43,316 times
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I don't know how you go with anything besides Eastwood's Unforgiven. That movie re-adjusted any thought I ever had about prior westerns. It defied the typical notions of redemption, took the murder and evil of the outlaw seriously, and was as realistic a study as you'll see on the gunfight.

I do think Open Range also did great credit to the classic western gunfight. Lots of chaos, confusion, stumbling misses, and brutal violence. Epic.

Last edited by califorlorn; 09-07-2011 at 11:16 AM..
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Texas
15,646 posts, read 14,712,163 times
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There are certainly some great westerns.

I have to go with my personal favorite: The Searchers.

I read the book after I saw the movie years ago and discovered that the author, Alan Le May also wrote The Unforgiven.
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
2,756 posts, read 5,265,593 times
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If you can let me consider a miniseries an 8-hour movie, then I have to go with Lonesome Dove, which was based on the Pulitzer prize-winning novel by the great Larry McMurtry.


Lonesome Dove - Best Scene - YouTube
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
2,756 posts, read 5,265,593 times
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I can't resist!

Honorable mentions:

[i][b]Unforgiven

The Outlaw Josey Wales

Silverado

Tombstone

The%2
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Old 09-07-2011, 01:46 PM
 
Location: The Lakes Region
3,074 posts, read 3,980,019 times
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"The Good, The Bad & The Ugly" has been mentioned a lot in this thread, justifiably so. But I want to point out what made that the best of the 3 Eastwood Spagetti Westerns, IMO. The monumental contrast between it and the first two - simply put - ELI WALLACH'S astounding performance. He chewed up the screen in every scene he was in, just like he chewed up the cigar when he was sitting on the wagon after meeting his brother, the priest. The sibling moment in the film wherein he brilliantly portrayed the frailty and magnificence of a common outlaw by proving the old adage "There is a little good in the worst of us and a little bad in the best of us !
He was for all intents and purposes, everyman, with all our foibles trying to find our path in a hostile and dangerous world.
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Old 09-07-2011, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
467 posts, read 1,241,023 times
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Lonesome Dove is the clear winner for me.
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Old 09-07-2011, 06:32 PM
 
5,500 posts, read 4,419,965 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pawporri View Post
"The Good, The Bad & The Ugly" has been mentioned a lot in this thread, justifiably so. But I want to point out what made that the best of the 3 Eastwood Spagetti Westerns, IMO. The monumental contrast between it and the first two - simply put - ELI WALLACH'S astounding performance. He chewed up the screen in every scene he was in, just like he chewed up the cigar when he was sitting on the wagon after meeting his brother, the priest. The sibling moment in the film wherein he brilliantly portrayed the frailty and magnificence of a common outlaw by proving the old adage "There is a little good in the worst of us and a little bad in the best of us !
He was for all intents and purposes, everyman, with all our foibles trying to find our path in a hostile and dangerous world.
What an in-depth observation...impressive!!! can't rep just yet, so here...
I agree with you...Eli Wallach gave a stellar performance in this movie. How about the desert scene where Eastwood bested him with a secret that required for him to appear contrite and friendly? Love that one as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ron1999 View Post
Lonesome Dove is the clear winner for me.
This one is more of a serious type western. Larry McMurtry succeeded in giving depth to the characters that everyone can relate to.
It's very rare that a "long" movie/TV series can keep me riveted with each turn...this one definitely has.
Thus, it doesn't matter which comes first..."Lonesome Dove" or "The Bad, The Good, & The Ugly" for both are spectacular. Yup! I'm a good western movie fan.
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Old 09-08-2011, 12:11 AM
 
15,924 posts, read 16,871,813 times
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The Bravados with Gregory Peck

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Old 09-08-2011, 02:41 AM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,236 posts, read 13,538,967 times
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I pick "Broken Trails" with Robert Duvall. It's not your typical Western but, despite being a long movie, I've watched it several times and never tire of it.
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