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Old 07-17-2017, 12:14 AM
 
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I joined a film club that has a mixed group of people with ages ranged from 52 to 23. We talk about films of all stripes but what struck me as odd is that the younger the person is the more disconnect there is when it comes to taste in films. I keep thinking it's just a generational thing but the guy who's 52 and I (I'm an older millennial at 30) share some similar tastes in films. We both talk about our affinity for films from the 70s. We can also both appreciate newer and older films that were made way before we were both born. Yet, I've noticed that younger millennials have less of an appreciation for good cinema from the past. The younger people in my group keep snickering at the choices of films we keep bringing up as classics. They seem to find the older movies, and to them "old" can include movies from the 90s, as cheesy and too melodramatic.

For instance, I brought up two golden Brian DePalma films, Carlito's Way and The Untouchables. Everyone in my film group loves those two films except for the really younger guys. I can admit fault with the latter as it does have it's TV-like sap moments but the film is a solid caper. Sean Connery, for one, was a hell of an actor as Malone. Now before some of you say it's just a generational thing, I am still relatively young too, but can appreciate a Hitchcock film, or Orson Welles The Third Man. I love a lot of films from the 70s and think films such as Dog Day Afternoon and The Godfather are masterpieces.

One of the movies the younger members recommended was a film called Nerve with Dave Franco and Emma Roberts. I took their advice and saw it on Amazon Prime and found the film to be horrible. Just utterly lacking in any quality whatsoever. But I get what attracts the film to younger millennials. It's very relevant with it's pop culture and current tech references, there are a lot of pretty people in it and the dialogue is hyper-realist. Younger members eschew what they believe to be "movie dialogue" and prefer hyper-realist dialogue as though you were recording an actual conversation with a group of teens. The younger members seem almost incapable of getting into a story that doesn't revolve around some aspect that can remind them of their own lives (that or obsession with escapist fantasy).

My list of fav films include Amadeus, Quiz Show, The Conversation, Hitchcock's Rebecca, Prince of the City, John Sayle's Lone Star, and Sidney Lumet's Q&A. The film's range from the 30s, 70s, 80s and 90s. All are not obscure films that only film snobs know about either, but acclaimed regular American films nominated for the Academy Awards. Half I watched when growing up and the other I picked up reading the Academy Awards Wiki page in search of good films.

I've yet to meet a younger person with even a remote interest in films before 2009. Most think Christopher Nolan is the epitome of good cinema, which I enjoy a lot too, not knocking his brilliance, but their frame of reference is frustrating.

This isn't to generalize all younger people, but only on average. I'm just curious as to what it is about this generation and their tastes in films, or what they look for in films and why many brush off the good cinema as tired old nostalgia in favor of this new school of cinema that lacks so much? For instance, while we can both agree that Baby Driver was a good exciting film, the younger members of my crowd act as though they've witnessed a cinematic masterpiece, and anything less than over hype is considered being a nostalgic old fogey who won't get with the times. It's just weird to me how they choose their films and how self assured many can be about their choice of films when lacking such a frame of reference.

How can they say it's the BEST MOVIE EVER (millennial overhype) without having seen or care to see some of the truly regarded masterpieces of yesteryear?

Last edited by radiolibre99; 07-17-2017 at 12:26 AM..
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Old 07-18-2017, 04:34 AM
 
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They'll outgrow it, or they won't. It doesn't matter. There's over a century's worth of of film grammar and effective storytelling in movies that isn't going to magically lose its relevance with the latest generation demographic (even if they try to argue different). I try to watch the latest movies in hopes of seeing new ways to tell or film a story, and I watch the older movies to understand how all movies work on a technical level.

And maybe if they appreciated old movies like Blade Runner, Heat, Return of the Jedi, Paprika, 2001 etc, they wouldn't think as highly of Nolan.
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Old 07-18-2017, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Maine
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I think it is less generational and more the environment in which you were raised.

We took our kids to the movies all the time, but we also watched classic movies and TV. So now my daughters can quote the GODFATHER at me, my son is a huge Charlie Chaplin and Hitchcock fan, and they in turn are exposing me to a lot of Japanese and Korean film and TV that I might not have otherwise watched. (By the way, check out SAMURAI GOURMET on Netflix. Best and weirdest foreign TV show I've seen in a long time.)

Some of my kids' friends have truly crappy taste in movies, but I've noticed that those friends parents have equally crappy taste in movies.

So in this issue, I think it's definitely a case of NURTURE not NATURE.
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Old 07-18-2017, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
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I think its just a sign of the times.. things go out of fashion. the happy ending doris day type films seen their day sadly, while some younger folk wont watch a black and white film. when it doesnt matter at all to me if its coloured or not.. Now its all computerised nonsense with too much swearing, and raunchy sex when its not called for.. I was sitting watching a mild sort of horror with my 15 year old granddaughter never expecting the sex scene that unfolded.. it was full on giving it laldy.. she was mortified and I asked her if she wanted it switched off, thankfully she said yes. as I was turning purple by then well past the red shades... now too some films need a philadelphia lawyer for me to work out the plots , theyre so obscure and muddled or is it just me whos older and cant work them out. My other crib is in the cinema the movies are far too loud.. is it dolby sound, its horrible. so I havent been to the cinema since Lincoln with Daniel Day Lewis, although I like him it was the biggest boring load of crap Ive seen in years.. I want entertained, bring back Gene Kelly, Kate Hepburn, Cagney, Bogart, Bette Dais , Bacall and the rest, as I dont know who half of these new so called stars are now they all look alike to me... or is that racist hahaha.
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Old 07-18-2017, 08:56 AM
Status: "You don't own me" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Massachusetts
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I think that it is definitely a matter of education and maturity.

If no one introduces you to classic films at an early age and teaches you to appreciate them, then you are more likely not to appreciate them as an adult. My parents are older (70's) and they always watched contemporary as well as classic films. My teachers also incorporated classic and foreign films into their curriculum. The result is that, while I didn't appreciate or understand those films as a youngster, I eventually learned to appreciate film as a concept, and I now watch movies from many different eras.

I've always said that the years when someone is in their teens and twenties is a very selfish time; it is the time when identity is still developing and the ego is still pretty fragile. Consequently, tweens often like movies that reflect their own age, experiences, beliefs, etc.

Whether they end up growing out of this pattern depends a lot on their education.
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Old 07-18-2017, 10:27 AM
Status: "Most annoying poster on cd according to 1986pacecar" (set 20 days ago)
 
2,528 posts, read 1,332,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark S. View Post
I think it is less generational and more the environment in which you were raised.

We took our kids to the movies all the time, but we also watched classic movies and TV. So now my daughters can quote the GODFATHER at me, my son is a huge Charlie Chaplin and Hitchcock fan, and they in turn are exposing me to a lot of Japanese and Korean film and TV that I might not have otherwise watched. (By the way, check out SAMURAI GOURMET on Netflix. Best and weirdest foreign TV show I've seen in a long time.)

Some of my kids' friends have truly crappy taste in movies, but I've noticed that those friends parents have equally crappy taste in movies.

So in this issue, I think it's definitely a case of NURTURE not NATURE.
Same with our kids. I have always loved movies (thanks dad) and so I shared that with my kids. I raised them on everything from Gone With the Wind, Night of the Living Dead to Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. We quote movies all the time and when they do it to their friends, they have no idea what they are talking about.

My kids friends don't seem to be into movies as much as my kids are.
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Old 07-18-2017, 11:28 AM
 
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You guys all bring up excellent points. And normally I would understand that it's simply a matter of how a child was raised and what movies they were raised on. But in this case it's a film club in which some of the younger members are trying to write scripts and break into the film industry. They're very wide eyed and determined, and never have I seen such self assured confidence in people, but it's so misdirected. I've noticed a pattern with these younger types and their reluctance to appreciate the older films besides the acclaimed classics that they're supposed to like. The younger members can appreciate 2001 A Space Odyssey, but I think it's mostly because they're supposed to like it because it's trendy. When I asked the same kid about Barry Lyndon, he looked at me as though he didn't know what I was talking about. If you claim to be a Kubrick fan but have never heard of Barry Lyndon, then what are you doing?

It's not that I am venting simply about this generation's lack of reference when it comes to good cinema. I am talking about millennials who want to do something in film and are self assured they'll break in but doing so without a good reference and only feeding themselves a steady diet of the latest stuff. Many millennials are obsessed with being relevant and consider dialogue, stories and plots that do not reflect some relevance to their lives in the now as being worthless. That is why the newer movies are chock full of pop culture references, the latest gadgets and such. They don't care about a film being timeless. They don't get that using all that I listed leads to lazy writing.

It's almost disrespectful the way some of them just blow off the older stuff as useless and only for nostalgic people who won't let go.

And if anyone in here can answer this for me. What is with younger millennials and their insistence to over-hype things? Is it that they lack a good reference of film and music and tv that they just think anything remotely good or even mediocre is THE BEST THING EVER! I mean the way they describe stuff that would make anyone past the age of 30 go "meh, I've seen better", is weird. They cry and say stuff such as, "I've never felt anything so powerful, I am bawling." And it would be for a comic book movie or a terrible soapy romantic young adult movie.
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Old 07-18-2017, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Maine
12,532 posts, read 17,201,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by radiolibre99 View Post
Many millennials are obsessed with being relevant
Which is a huge mistake. Ignore "relevance." Don't chase trends. Be Truthful. Relevance be damned.


Quote:
Originally Posted by radiolibre99 View Post
That is why the newer movies are chock full of pop culture references, the latest gadgets and such. They don't care about a film being timeless. They don't get that using all that I listed leads to lazy writing.
Yup. All those trendy references they love in movies are going to be meaningless stupidity in 15 years time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by radiolibre99 View Post
And if anyone in here can answer this for me. What is with younger millennials and their insistence to over-hype things? Is it that they lack a good reference of film and music and tv that they just think anything remotely good or even mediocre is THE BEST THING EVER!
I'd cut them some slack on that. That is just the stupidity of youth. Most of us were the same way at that age. Age hopefully brings a certain amount of wisdom, and they don't have it yet.
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Old 07-18-2017, 01:52 PM
 
9,635 posts, read 5,561,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark S. View Post
Which is a huge mistake. Ignore "relevance." Don't chase trends. Be Truthful. Relevance be damned.




Yup. All those trendy references they love in movies are going to be meaningless stupidity in 15 years time.




I'd cut them some slack on that. That is just the stupidity of youth. Most of us were the same way at that age. Age hopefully brings a certain amount of wisdom, and they don't have it yet.
You're right and I try to cut them slack on that but films where I was under the same spell included Heat, Gladiator, Fargo, Pulp Fiction, English Patient, Schindler's List. Those films aren't even in the list of a film snobs top ten either. They were just the mainstream movies of their day.

They'll go ga-ga over Divergent, The Hunger Games and The Fault in our Stars. Or they think Inception is the greatest film of our time.

Also I think the obsession with relevance leads to people asking why there aren't people of color or women in films such as the upcoming Dunkirk. Apparently, cultural relevance matters more than historical accuracy.
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Old 07-18-2017, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
15,181 posts, read 45,499,644 times
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"And if anyone in here can answer this for me. What is with younger millennials and their insistence to over-hype things? Is it that they lack a good reference of film and music and tv that they just think anything remotely good or even mediocre is THE BEST THING EVER! I mean the way they describe stuff that would make anyone past the age of 30 go "meh, I've seen better", is weird. They cry and say stuff such as, "I've never felt anything so powerful, I am bawling." And it would be for a comic book movie or a terrible soapy romantic young adult movie."

When your experience consists of the limited selection of "product" commonly available to the public, and you've only had about ten years to even remotely comprehend plot, a film showing a cow pooing in a pasture could be great art.

Opinion and evaluation are based upon preexisting reference points and the ability to critically examine. There are films I love, like "Landscapes in the Mist," that are so esoteric and deep in metaphor that I have no expectation of anyone understanding them at all without certain background education. I used to love "Grapes of Wrath" until I delved more into history and saw the twisting of history to suit the plot and agenda. It still is a masterwork, but along different lines than I initially thought.

We older folk tend to look at some of the pronouncements of youngsters with a bit of humor. I keep remembering a cub reporter on tv, assigned to cover a potential tornado. "As he stood in a parking lot with an overturned shopping cart in the background, his novice stentorian inflection went to the effect of "In my professional experience, I've never seen such powerful wind." He had just been hired a couple months earlier, so it was a valid statement.

Opinion can also hook onto personal value systems. I took a film course from a prof that used to visit my theatre regularly. It was obvious that he and I had entirely different viewpoints. While I had little use for his, I recognized that his "take" did have enough confluence with general opinion that he was tenured. Similarly, there used to be movie reviewers that were fairly obviously smoking the good stuff or getting paid under the table. Siskel and Ebert rose to prominence because the rest of the field was crap in comparison. (Siskel was the better reviewer, IMO.)

Don't focus too heavily on the opinions of others. Read, delve into background, enjoy, and have comfort in your own opinion.
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