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Old 08-09-2017, 01:15 AM
 
1,135 posts, read 415,559 times
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Basically in alot of movies, if a pistol is cocked, the character, will uncock, it by pulling the trigger slightly and lowering the hammer. But I was wondering, why do you they do this? It's just risky to fire that way.

Would it make more sense to put the safety on, since the safety itself de-***** the hammer, after it's switched on?
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Old 08-09-2017, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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The classic American semiautomatic pistol used since The Great War did not have that feature. By the time newer pistols reached the average person the film depiction became expected vision of weapons handling Just like racking a round into a weapon that given the tactical situation should have already been made ready
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Old 08-09-2017, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Maine
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What Taiko said.

And also, it depends on the gun. Some revolvers don't have a "safety." You just lower the hammer, and the only way to do that is to pull the trigger slightly. As for semi-autos ... well, only an idiot walks around with a cocked gun on his hip.

The thing that irks me about gunplay in movies: Everyone ignores how loud they are. Cops wear ear protection at the gun range for a reason. If you fire a gun inside a closed room or a hallway, you aren't going to be hearing much bit a high-pitched ringing in your ears for a long time.

Remember that scene in Terminator 2 when Sarah Connor was firing the pistol inside the elevator? One of her ear plugs fell out and Linda Hamilton now has permanent hearing damage. That's how loud guns are in real life.
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Old 08-09-2017, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Annandale, VA
8,263 posts, read 6,673,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark S. View Post
What Taiko said.

And also, it depends on the gun. Some revolvers don't have a "safety." You just lower the hammer, and the only way to do that is to pull the trigger slightly. As for semi-autos ... well, only an idiot walks around with a cocked gun on his hip.

The thing that irks me about gunplay in movies: Everyone ignores how loud they are. Cops wear ear protection at the gun range for a reason. If you fire a gun inside a closed room or a hallway, you aren't going to be hearing much bit a high-pitched ringing in your ears for a long time.

Remember that scene in Terminator 2 when Sarah Connor was firing the pistol inside the elevator? One of her ear plugs fell out and Linda Hamilton now has permanent hearing damage. That's how loud guns are in real life.
Also, guns in movies don't have the proper "kick" that they should have in real life. This is especially apparent when they fire shotguns.
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Old 08-09-2017, 11:38 AM
 
15,405 posts, read 7,804,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark S. View Post
What Taiko said.

And also, it depends on the gun. Some revolvers don't have a "safety." You just lower the hammer, and the only way to do that is to pull the trigger slightly. As for semi-autos ... well, only an idiot walks around with a cocked gun on his hip.

A hammer-fired semi-auto with a safety is properly carried "cocked and locked."

Quote:
The thing that irks me about gunplay in movies: Everyone ignores how loud they are. Cops wear ear protection at the gun range for a reason. If you fire a gun inside a closed room or a hallway, you aren't going to be hearing much bit a high-pitched ringing in your ears for a long time.

Remember that scene in Terminator 2 when Sarah Connor was firing the pistol inside the elevator? One of her ear plugs fell out and Linda Hamilton now has permanent hearing damage. That's how loud guns are in real life.
True. The noise is even a tactical factor. I think I've seen a couple of programs where it was displayed, but for sure, it's ignored.


So, normally, is recoil. I remember when my daughter first fired a handgun. She did fine, but her comment was, "Movies lie!" She was expecting something of a backwards thump, but not the feeling of actually maintaining control of a miniature natural catastrophe in her hand.
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Old 08-09-2017, 11:41 AM
 
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One of the problems with The Dark Tower is that the Gunslinger did not have to [rooster] his revolvers.


The problem with most programs is that they do [rooster] pistols that don't need it, and as mentioned, always chamber rounds into guns that in the situation should have already had a round chambered.

Last edited by Ralph_Kirk; 08-09-2017 at 11:50 AM..
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Old 08-09-2017, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
4,633 posts, read 3,475,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Basically in alot of movies, if a pistol is cocked, the character, will uncock, it by pulling the trigger slightly and lowering the hammer. But I was wondering, why do you they do this? It's just risky to fire that way.
Would it make more sense to put the safety on, since the safety itself de-***** the hammer, after it's switched on?
Hahahaha. Nice PC edit there, C-D.
Lots of pistols can't be put on safe with the hammer pulled back. Most will not smack the firing pin unless dropping from full ck.
What I find ridiculous is the use of cking a pistol or chambering a round in a rifle as a threat noise. It's like saying, "Fooled you, I had you quaking in your boots, but there was no way I could have shot you."
Hilarity is when the actor cks their weapon multiple times.
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Old 08-09-2017, 04:50 PM
 
Location: USA
800 posts, read 309,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark S. View Post

The thing that irks me about gunplay in movies: Everyone ignores how loud they are. Cops wear ear protection at the gun range for a reason. If you fire a gun inside a closed room or a hallway, you aren't going to be hearing much bit a high-pitched ringing in your ears for a long time.

Remember that scene in Terminator 2 when Sarah Connor was firing the pistol inside the elevator? One of her ear plugs fell out and Linda Hamilton now has permanent hearing damage. That's how loud guns are in real life.
Sorry to hear that about her.



Not knowledgeable at all regarding firearms

Someone suggested to me if you only want to buy one gun for home protection and your not a good shot, make it a shotgun, and here's why;

You're in bed and someone is walking towards your BR.

They're in your doorway, so you fire a pistol and miss.

For a brief moment or two, not only do you have limited hearing, but they can now determine where you are via the flash of light and now possibly shoot you!


Same scene with a shotgun.

You hear one or more approaching.

You grab the shotgun and pump it.

They hear the sound but keep on coming anyway.

With a shotgun you can have more of a wider range when you fire.

A Park Ranger told me he packs his own shells with either pennies, nickels, or dimes 'cause they spread out more?



I think it's funny how in the older movies and television shows they always jerked their hand back and fourth with each and every shot, similar to a stabbing motion, though I can't imagine anyone doing that in real life, even in the days of yesteryear.

Folklore has it that Clint Eastwood was one of the first to actually show pistol recoil in a more realistic manor, don't know if that's true or not.
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Old 08-09-2017, 06:48 PM
 
15,405 posts, read 7,804,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noregon98 View Post
Sorry to hear that about her.



Not knowledgeable at all regarding firearms

Someone suggested to me if you only want to buy one gun for home protection and your not a good shot, make it a shotgun, and here's why;

You're in bed and someone is walking towards your BR.

They're in your doorway, so you fire a pistol and miss.
Practice so that you don't miss someone standing in the doorway. And if you can't see well enough to aim accurately at a whole human body standing in a doorway, you probably shouldn't shoot. Could be your spouse.

Quote:
For a brief moment or two, not only do you have limited hearing, but they can now determine where you are via the flash of light and now possibly shoot you!
Be behind cover or concealment and move immediately after firing. This is a tactical move called "shoot and scoot" or "stick and move," and you should always do it. And when you go down behind cover or concealment, do not come back out from the same point you went in.


Quote:
Same scene with a shotgun.

You hear one or more approaching.

You grab the shotgun and pump it.

They hear the sound but keep on coming anyway.
They got a bead on your location when you threw away a round. If you didn't have a round chambered, you were risking getting snagged by the bad guy before you had a chance to chamber a round. Don't presume you'll always have a chance to pick up the gun and get a round chambered before someone can grab it from you. Don't presume you'll even remember to chamber a round when roused out of sleep into a state of adrenaline-panic.

Quote:
With a shotgun you can have more of a wider range when you fire.
If you live in a bowling alley, maybe. In a normal room, you're only going to get a spread of 4 or five inches on the far wall. That's still going to be a miss.

Quote:
A Park Ranger told me he packs his own shells with either pennies, nickels, or dimes 'cause they spread out more?
If you're loading your own, it should bespeak enough effort at guncraft to be a good shot under pressure. I don't know how much the average park ranger shoots. Hopefully more than the average police officer.
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Old 08-09-2017, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
4,633 posts, read 3,475,916 times
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If you're not up for a firearm, it has been suggested to avoid pepper spray and go with Wasp & Hornet Spray. Very debilitating, less reside to affect you, and longer range.
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