U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Movies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-19-2018, 11:50 AM
 
22 posts, read 6,778 times
Reputation: 59

Advertisements

First off, I actually think this movie seems very progressive for 1945 (including how risqué it gets, though not for the reasons on this topic of course). As for the husband, he leaves her before any of that happens, but indeed her willful, strong personality clashes with his traditional-minded one and they seem to have reached a breaking point— they’re always fighting (“we were fighting in the kitchen as usual. It seemed as though I’d spent my whole life in a kitchen, pausing only to give birth to 2 daughters” — again, progressive in having a bluntly feminist angle) and he’s seeing another woman (the main catalyst for the separation when she calls him at the home phone and he’s about to go see her).

As for her daughter, here’s the thing, she doesn’t resent her mom for the sake of being a working WOMAN but rather because Veda’s mentally disturbed, dillusional, and obsessed with material wealth, so she admires Berrigan for coming from an OLD MONEY family and that he was born into wealth rather than starting off poor and having to work for a high income. As someone born and raised in Pasadena myself (disclaimer: I’m not a snob, furthest from it), I’m aware that Pasadena is a place associated with old money, so families there have been wealthy since their ancestors were wealthy there since the early-mid-1800s. Remember that the Malibu beach house in the movie is a 2nd house but he’s originally from that gigantic Victorian house Mildred later wants to buy in a desperate attempt to win back her daughter. Earlier when Veda is fighting with her mom she says “I know what kind of house you grew up in. You think that just because you made some money you can get some new outfits and a different hairstyle and that makes you a different person.” Veda’s deeply disturbed and a snob times a million. But — and they live in what looks to be a middle-class suburb in the San Fernando Valley — it displays old money vs. new money dynamics in LA County. Amazing movie btw.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-19-2018, 11:53 AM
 
4,220 posts, read 4,442,789 times
Reputation: 9303
Such a good movie!!! Veda needed a pie in the face!! Amongst other things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 04:48 PM
 
22 posts, read 6,778 times
Reputation: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by paperinopazzo View Post
First off, I actually think this movie seems very progressive for 1945 (including how risqué it gets, though not for the reasons on this topic of course). As for the husband, he leaves her before any of that happens, but indeed her willful, strong personality clashes with his traditional-minded one and they seem to have reached a breaking point— they’re always fighting (“we were fighting in the kitchen as usual. It seemed as though I’d spent my whole life in a kitchen, pausing only to give birth to 2 daughters” — again, progressive in having a bluntly feminist angle) and he’s seeing another woman (the main catalyst for the separation when she calls him at the home phone and he’s about to go see her).

As for her daughter, here’s the thing, she doesn’t resent her mom for the sake of being a working WOMAN but rather because Veda’s mentally disturbed, dillusional, and obsessed with material wealth, so she admires Berrigan for coming from an OLD MONEY family and that he was born into wealth rather than starting off poor and having to work for a high income. As someone born and raised in Pasadena myself (disclaimer: I’m not a snob, furthest from it), I’m aware that Pasadena is a place associated with old money, so families there have been wealthy since their ancestors were wealthy there since the early-mid-1800s. Remember that the Malibu beach house in the movie is a 2nd house but he’s originally from that gigantic Victorian house Mildred later wants to buy in a desperate attempt to win back her daughter. Earlier when Veda is fighting with her mom she says “I know what kind of house you grew up in. You think that just because you made some money you can get some new outfits and a different hairstyle and that makes you a different person.” Veda’s deeply disturbed and a snob times a million. But — and they live in what looks to be a middle-class suburb in the San Fernando Valley — it displays old money vs. new money dynamics in LA County. Amazing movie btw.
Woops, self-corrections:
spelling: (1) Beregan (not “Berrigan”); (2) delusional (mispelled “dillusional”)
Also, I’d forgotten Mildred’s house is in Glendale (just looked it up), not the San Fernando Valley, which makes sense, especially since in 1945 the San Fernando Valley was still largely rural (obviously unlike Mildred’s suburban environment, and her 1st drive-in restaurant she opens is stated as being in Glendale), and by the way “rural” way back then meant it was still like the Wild West, although a city in the Valley (as we Los Angelenos call it) that still largely retains its rural nature today is Calabasas (horse ranches and all), which also retains old western buildings like in Old Town Calabasas including going back to mid-1800s, and places like Sagebrush Cantina and Sundance Saloon both from the 1920s.

Really sidetracked off-topic, but anyways back to the movie, someone mentioned in the thread the Depression. A few things on that. Indeed when the narrated part of the story starts it’s 1938 but the story goes up to 1945, and there’s a reference to wartime rationing (WW2 ended in 1945), when Mildred is on a ladder installing ceiling-light fixtures at the first restaurant and the camera pans up her legs when Monte Beregan walks in, he says “You know it’s times like these I’m glad nylons are out for the duration.” Naughty Monte.

Even though the plot line begins in ‘38 and WW2 in ‘41 ended the Depression in the US, I read recently (fittingly in a book about neon and Googie restaurant architecture in Greater LA starting up in the ‘20s) that Greater Los Angeles was in many ways largely immune to the Depression, so the ‘20s economic boom in the US continued to thrive in the LA area throughout the ‘30s. (Makes sense btw that so many people dreamt about going to Hollywood in the ‘30s and make it big in acting — see “A Star Is Born” from
1937, and that Dust Bowl farmers migrated to California to make income with crops — see “The Grapes of Wrath” from 1940.) So this matters in that the Depression-economy doesn’t factor in the plot of “Mildred Perce,” but rather Mildred being a single mother of 2, which applies to a lot of moms & dads of course in any day & age (Mildred looking everywhere for a job and finding one waitressing to put food on the table). (Obviously SOME industries, people, and areas within Greater LA were impacted by the Depression, not claiming otherwise, just they were the exception to the rule in Greater LA.)

And yes, my God is Veda a vile human to the core.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2018, 07:38 AM
 
Location: here
24,474 posts, read 28,767,996 times
Reputation: 31056
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Oh okay. But wouldn't a woman who owned a chain of restaurants and make that kind of money, be considered pro-family by her daughter and boyfriend, since she is doing it for the kids? I mean she wasn't a mother, I could see it as being selfish, and aggressive for the time, but since she has kids, doesn't that make her pro-family support?

I mean if a single mother stayed at home with the kids all the time, doesn't occur to her boyfriend and daughter realize that she would run out of money, are they really that stupid?
I think it was very out of the ordinary for the time period. It's encouraging that you find it hard to understand. We must be making progress
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2018, 04:41 PM
 
18,311 posts, read 11,700,635 times
Reputation: 11948
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
So I watched the movie and maybe since it's before my time, there is something in the movie I don't understand. Why was it so bad for a woman to be a restaurant owner back then? Her daughter and her boyfriend hate the fact that she is in a restaurant and want resent her for it, but why is was it so bad for a woman to be a restaurant owner back then, especially when she owns three!??
Long story short the world was a different place prior and just after WWII, especially for women.


There were women in 1940's who owned businesses just as there had been in decades before, it was the type of that bothered Vera. Just like to some owning a shop was not very much better than working in one, so was owning a restaurant versus being a glorified waitress.


Vera also had issues with her mother long before this; such as the fact she (like her mother (Vera's grandmother) was "frump" and "took in washing" to make a living. This along with baking pies is how Mildred Pierce supported herself and family thanks to being saddled with a no account (and cheating) husband.


It goes back to what is considered being a "Lady" (with capital "L"). In Vera's mind/world a true lady would have either come from money and or married it; not washed people's dirty drawers and or cooked their food.


There were probably plenty of other girls at Vera's school and or of her age in neighborhood whose mothers were doing the exact same thing. But Vera had *PLANS* and her mother being a drudge didn't fit into that narrative.


To put it bluntly Vera was a self-loathing, spiteful and sorry B**TH. I for one am always happy with the ending of MP seeing her hauled off to jail (and likely) in due time to the gas chamber.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Movies
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top