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Old 07-20-2018, 02:26 PM
 
804 posts, read 656,217 times
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Poor analogy; cigs cause harm to OTHERS (from second-hand smoke; that's how I got asthma), and junk food only to the eater thereof.
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Old 07-20-2018, 02:43 PM
 
18,304 posts, read 11,693,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Ain't that the truth! Try living in California, where they act like a tiny puff of smoke 10ft away is going to KILL THEM instantly. And I had to roll my eyes when CVS stopped selling cigarettes to "promote a healthy lifestyle" - yet they still sell candy/junk food, alcohol, and prescription drugs that could kill a horse with one dose. Selective much?

Anyway, I do agree it's less prevalent in movies and shows these days. You really only see a character smoking if it's specific to the plotline/time period, or if they're trying to make them look "bad." Compare that to movies from the '50s-60s, for example, where it was just a normal part of the background activity... even better, watch some old game or talk shows, where the guests and/or hosts would be smoking on live TV! On episodes of the original "Match Game," you can see ashtrays and wafts of smoke coming from certain panel members (like Charles Nelson Reilly and Richard Dawson). You would NEVER see that today.
Think also many actors smoked themselves; thus doing so became sort of a prop or maybe a script device even if not always written into the plot.


Bette Davis and quite a few others from the "studio system" days smoked like a chimney.
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Old 07-21-2018, 12:28 AM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
4,011 posts, read 1,783,877 times
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Here is how it’s done. Lessons learned from Big Tobacco’s strategy of lawyers & scientists: (Or: How to Create a Controversy so that we always need “more research”):
https://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpress...&brand=ucpress

1. “It’s not epidemic; we are just learning more about diagnosing!”:

“In his progress report about the work conducted in 1977, Dr. Rothschild asks for continued support and states that his work has shown that autopsy and lung biopsy are confirmed in only about 20 percent of deceased patients. This finding would be important to the tobacco industry because the industry argues that lung cancer is diagnosed more often than it actually occurs.”

2. “Probably genetic ...” (Divert the focus away from what you already know is causing the problem & say it’s hereditary):

“Rothschild said that his work "indicates that genetic factors may play a significant role in this excess mortality from lung cancer" and "If we can isolate such genetic markers, it will be a major step toward unraveling another aspect in the mystery of lung cancer causation"

3. Dr. Woo-Woo:

If a physician happens to lend their credibility to the issue you are trying to discredit; simply discredit the physician as a quack by finding something they have supported in the past, such as supplements, acupuncture, etc ...

“The article's basic premise is that physicians "jump on the bandwagon" of whatever therapies are popular and use these therapies even though there is little scientific evidence of their validity. The article criticizes the overwhelming acceptance of unproven but popular ideas—"the bandwagons of medicine.

Exercise, vitamins, high fiber diet, and the complete elimination of cigarettes are all rapidly gaining acceptance among physicians, though at present time there is no definitive evidence to support their value .”

4. The Scietific Consensus (& the scientists) In Your Pocket:

Basically an In crowd of doctors, scientists & writers who will bully those with opposing evidence & attempt to invalidate them & possibly their work (retractions).

“The clippings—with titles such as "Smokers—Take Heart," "Doctor Slams Link between Smoking and Heart Disease," and "Smoking Does Not Cause Heart Disease"—describe Seltzer as a doctor from Harvard University.

... Seltzer's letter critizes the Framingham heart study, which evidently had been discussed in the interview. This study, the largest population-based study of heart disease epidemiology, had found that smoking is a cause of heart disease (6, 7). In an hominem attack on the scientist rather than the science, Seltzer claims that Castelli deliberately misled the "American public":“

There are a few more. All above examples are found between pgs 289-294 in above link.
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Old 07-21-2018, 01:05 AM
 
Location: on the wind
4,211 posts, read 1,563,266 times
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It isn't rocket science OP! The way audience members view a character who smokes is a lot different than it was in the past. Those scheming, devious screenwriters...they are manipulating the impressions you form of everyone in the story because they want you to sympathize with, suspect, hate, like, or fear them. Smoking is a controversial thing that triggers an emotional response.

Last edited by Parnassia; 07-21-2018 at 01:40 AM..
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Old 07-21-2018, 01:12 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
14,526 posts, read 11,505,888 times
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[quote=ironpony;52547922]You just don't see it anymore, but in real life, a lot of people still do it, so I wonder why the movies and tv shy away from it now. You could say it's because of public health influence, but you see so many characters in movies and TV, drink and do drugs and have unprotected sex, that I wonder if that is the real reason.

Its all politics.......were brainwashed by them as now every show has gays in it, men kissing men before the watershed because its all legal now.. ciggies are off the radar for health reasons but as you said its bouncing around in the scuddy in movies and thats ok .. and drug selling or taking is rife... doesnt make sense, personally I hate smoking but how I miss ones like Bette Davis having a good old puff in a movie haha... good post ironpony....

Last edited by dizzybint; 07-21-2018 at 01:21 AM..
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Old 07-21-2018, 12:08 PM
 
Location: not where you are
7,923 posts, read 7,274,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
I notice that there are a lot more zombies, superheroes, wizards, faster-than-light travelers, and giant robots than transform into vehicles in movies and TV than in real life, too.

Weird...
Giggles.
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Old 07-21-2018, 12:44 PM
 
7,563 posts, read 7,994,022 times
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Really? Obviously, they show a lot of smoking in period shows like Mad Men and The Americans, but I also see it in shows taking place in the current day. Usually, these are the "bad" people. Check out Yellowstone on the Paramount Network. I think there was smoking on Breaking Bad, as well, if I remember correctly. And Julianna would sneak one when her character was stressed on The Good Wife. Cigars, apparently, are not smoked by bad people, as in Boston Legal.

Talk shows used to have a lot of smoking. Everyone and the host was lighting up. Everyone had an ash tray in front of them. Smoking killed Johnny Carson.
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Old 07-21-2018, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
9,674 posts, read 5,672,183 times
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I don't believe in the artificial suppression of human activity just because it's harmful - which is tantamount to censorship. Look, a spade!



.
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Old 07-21-2018, 02:24 PM
 
18,304 posts, read 11,693,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coney View Post
Really? Obviously, they show a lot of smoking in period shows like Mad Men and The Americans, but I also see it in shows taking place in the current day. Usually, these are the "bad" people. Check out Yellowstone on the Paramount Network. I think there was smoking on Breaking Bad, as well, if I remember correctly. And Julianna would sneak one when her character was stressed on The Good Wife. Cigars, apparently, are not smoked by bad people, as in Boston Legal.

Talk shows used to have a lot of smoking. Everyone and the host was lighting up. Everyone had an ash tray in front of them. Smoking killed Johnny Carson.


Peter Jennings (one of my favourite television journalists) died from long cancer caused by smoking.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Jennings



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vRfdgU2Q4E


Mr. Jennings like Yul Brynner would go on to make various anti-smoking statements or whatever.





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNjunlWUJJI
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Old 07-21-2018, 04:46 PM
 
7,563 posts, read 7,994,022 times
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David Brinkley used to smoke while delivering the news on the air.
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