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Old 12-05-2010, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Going back to the forest to be with nature's goodness.
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Bobby Rondinelli.
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Old 12-05-2010, 11:32 AM
 
Location: South Jordan, Utah
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For those of you taht think all great drummers are in the 60's and 70's rock bands, you mised this guy. Ed Cassidy of Spirit, the oldest rock drummer (16 years older than Ginger Baker).


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZfoM...eature=related
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Old 12-05-2010, 12:27 PM
 
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A thread like this comes up periodically. I have to agree: Buddy Rich, then everybody else. Buddy had the whole package--tremendous technique, great rhythm (he could swing hard or lightly equally well), fronted consistently good bands for years, and enjoyed a career spanning a half-century. Few, if any drummers can say all of that.

Here is Rich performing his version of the theme from West Side Story. When I saw him perform this live in the 1970's he stretched the tune to nearly 20 minutes, much of it with a blistering solo. Rich could be somewhat acerbic in personality--I know, I met him back in the 1970's, but his drum playing was a sight and sound sensation to behold that no video can really do justice to. In fact, most of his stick movements were so rapid that video equipment couldn't capture them.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_itERkuxpg


I also agree, for his short performing life, Chick Webb was a phenomenon--had he lived he and Rich would have been in dead heats for the best.



I'm also surprised that there is only one mention of Louie Bellson. He also enjoyed a long career--played with several great bands and fronted his own great band for awhile. He was one of the pioneers of the double-bass drum, over a decade before most rockers ever discovered it.

Here's Bellson with the Duke Ellington band from 1953, playing "Skin Deep"--especially check out the double-bass work toward the end.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkO6eRxE-yU
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Old 12-05-2010, 12:31 PM
 
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Any and all the percussionists who've ever been privileged enough to play for/with Frank Zappa.

Zappa was a perfectionist who demanded only the best from people he allowed on stage or in the studio with him.
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Old 12-05-2010, 12:51 PM
 
Location: South Jordan, Utah
6,521 posts, read 4,181,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
A thread like this comes up periodically. I have to agree: Buddy Rich, then everybody else. Buddy had the whole package--tremendous technique, great rhythm (he could swing hard or lightly equally well), fronted consistently good bands for years, and enjoyed a career spanning a half-century. Few, if any drummers can say all of that.

Here is Rich performing his version of the theme from West Side Story. When I saw him perform this live in the 1970's he stretched the tune to nearly 20 minutes, much of it with a blistering solo. Rich could be somewhat acerbic in personality--I know, I met him back in the 1970's, but his drum playing was a sight and sound sensation to behold that no video can really do justice to. In fact, most of his stick movements were so rapid that video equipment couldn't capture them.
I was lucky enough to meet him also, I got a picture with him and an autograph, but never a stick. He would play at Disneyland often so it was great to se him upclose. I think that 82 concert with Sinatra must have been the same tour I saw Sinatra, I saw them in 83 though.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I also agree, for his short performing life, Chick Webb was a phenomenon--had he lived he and Rich would have been in dead heats for the best.

I'm also surprised that there is only one mention of Louie Bellson. He also enjoyed a long career--played with several great bands and fronted his own great band for awhile. He was one of the pioneers of the double-bass drum, over a decade before most rockers ever discovered it.

Here's Bellson with the Duke Ellington band from 1953, playing "Skin Deep"--especially check out the double-bass work toward the end.
Bellson was great also and a nice guy, I got to meet him and his wife at DLand, they loved seeing "kids" at their shows. Pearl sang with his band one song, that was cool to see.

I know I come across snoby with regards to all of the "great" rock drummers posted here but with most of them they are at their limits, arm based drummers can't progress like drumers who learn better techniques. My drum teacher told me that my first leason, either re-learn how to play (I was an arm drummer) or be stuck at a certain level. Sure as we see you can be great but nothing like the true greats.
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Old 12-05-2010, 01:19 PM
 
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You guys are also forgetting a important fact. It adds difficulty when you are trying to follow a inspirational guitar player like Eddie, Eric, Jimi, Pete, Jimmy, SRV and so on. They would just go off into a unrehearsed solo that they made up as they went. It just came out. I will also add that nearly everyone has heard of the Rock greats listed. I consider myself a pretty serious music nut and never heard of these guys you listed. Jazz is not my thing though I will admit. You also don't have the rowdy crowds, jacked amps blasting at ear piercing volumes right next to you either. Trying to maintain concentration and stay focused during that must be a accomplishment in itself.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52PXF...eature=related
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Old 12-05-2010, 01:28 PM
 
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Man oh man, this is a great example of that. Pyrotechnics and cannons blasting in your ears along with Angus and Malcolm rippin it!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H33vS...eature=related
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Old 12-05-2010, 01:38 PM
 
Location: South Jordan, Utah
6,521 posts, read 4,181,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axle grease View Post
You guys are also forgetting a important fact. It adds difficulty when you are trying to follow a inspirational guitar player like Eddie, Eric, Jimi, Pete, Jimmy, SRV and so on. They would just go off into a unrehearsed solo that they made up as they went. It just came out. I will also add that nearly everyone has heard of the Rock greats listed. I consider myself a pretty serious music nut and never heard of these guys you listed. Jazz is not my thing though I will admit. You also don't have the rowdy crowds, jacked amps blasting at ear piercing volumes right next to you either. Trying to maintain concentration and stay focused during that must be a accomplishment in itself.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52PXF...eature=related
You don't get more improvisational than Jazz and Fusion, that is the ultimate in difficulty. I understand that as far as rock drummers go (most suck) these guys are the best but the topic is the greatest drummers and while good they don't rank up there in improvisational ability and technique with a lot of drummers. Look at how many drummers can copy their stuff, in the jazz and fusion world it is very difficult. It is one thing to enjoy popular musicians but it is another to insist that they are the best. How often is the best the most popular in America?

I was lucky to have a drum teacher who would not let me stay in the rock world, he would expand my horizons all the time. Listen to Billy Cobham in this vid from the 70ís.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4xJXNdNKOk
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Old 12-05-2010, 01:44 PM
 
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Follow this! LOL

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dSR0Cq228k
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Old 12-05-2010, 01:59 PM
 
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Yes, Stevie was doing things with that Strat that even Hendrix would have said.......... WTH???? I thought when I wrote it I made it unique enough. Damn Stevie!! LOL
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