U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Music
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-29-2012, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Australia
4,004 posts, read 5,268,724 times
Reputation: 6774

Advertisements

I'm looking to upgrade all of my home entertainment equipment and was wondering what the most popular music system is.

I'm still back in the turntable days.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-04-2012, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Australia
4,004 posts, read 5,268,724 times
Reputation: 6774
Not one person bothered to reply?

Bump
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2012, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,095 posts, read 23,616,952 times
Reputation: 7981
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsAnnThrope View Post
I'm looking to upgrade all of my home entertainment equipment and was wondering what the most popular music system is.

I'm still back in the turntable days.

Nothing wrong with having a turntable. Can buy albums at Best Buy and a growing selection of online and small music stores. What you need depends on your budget. I'd recommend a surround sound system. If you have a good size budget, go high end receiver and speakers. If budget is too tight for that, you could go for the HTB or home theater in a box. If you can afford it, don't go to Walmart for such a system. Go to an electronic store. An HTB will give you a receiver, speakers, and what you need to get started. Some of the ones at Walmart are horrible while a few are OK. If you don't already have it, get a blue ray DVD player which will also play your usic CDs. You can connect your turntable and other music players to the surround sound receiver. Once it's all set up, what receiver sound setting you use will depend on music source and your listening preference. I have an old Kenwood and listen to surround (Dolby digital, DTS, or Dolby Pro Logic II Movie or Music) for TV and movies. For music, I use the Dolby Pro Logic (which plays through the front three speakers and subwoofer). Other music options include stereo, Pro Logic II Music, or digital if your source plays digital. For records, I'd go with either stereo or Dolby Pro Logic.

If you want highend, buy a good receiver and two speakers first if you can't afford the whole system at one time. Then piece by piece you can add subwoofer, center voice speaker, two rear speakers, and maybe a rear center speaker depending on your room layout.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2012, 06:57 PM
 
640 posts, read 611,582 times
Reputation: 587
Default To answer your question...

Audio reproduction is a bit of a hobby for me. My main system is built around Martin Logan speakers and McIntosh separates. For a secondary system, my computer rig, I use an Onkyo receiver with KEF speakers.

That said, upgrading one's system can be fairly dependent on one's budget. Thankfully, a nice playback kit can be had for very little money. Were it me, I'd first identify what my primary music source were to be...CD, Blu-Ray, internet radio, downloads, or vinyl.

I'd be happy to entertain any specific questions you have though being in Australia might make certain brands of equipment more difficult to acquire/ cost prohibitive.

Also, you might find some general information on AudioReview, Audiogon, or AudioKarma...

What are your goals?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2012, 10:43 PM
 
16,506 posts, read 20,901,804 times
Reputation: 47862
My system is as old as the hills-almost as old as myself.

Pioneer QX-4000 quadrophonic receiver
Thorens TD-185 turntable
Technics #3300 turntable
Harmen Karden HK-20 speakers
Pioneer 8 track player recorder
Pioneer cassette deck
Panasonic cd changer

OLD I say-----OLD!!!!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2012, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Australia
4,004 posts, read 5,268,724 times
Reputation: 6774
Aw awesome thanks guys.

My goals - music, just like in the olden days.

I will be starting very small and cheap though...sounds like a blu ray is the way to go in the first instance.

how would you listen to downloaded music?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2012, 12:32 AM
 
14 posts, read 16,092 times
Reputation: 12
Default Yamaha All the Way

Yamaha is my sound system. The music is crisp and clear and it produces excellent bass. I have had them all bose just didn't do it for me. Go with a good Yamaha sound system, you won't be sorry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2012, 08:44 AM
 
640 posts, read 611,582 times
Reputation: 587
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsAnnThrope View Post
Aw awesome thanks guys.

My goals - music, just like in the olden days.

I will be starting very small and cheap though...sounds like a blu ray is the way to go in the first instance.

how would you listen to downloaded music?
Rarely will digital recapture the "old days"...digital recordings, especially high resolution tend to sacrifice soul for detail.

The path of least resistance would probably be to go with a computer which will give you more options as far as control over EQ. I suspect a very simple system sending the signal from a computer into a receiver out to two speakers would best suit your needs.

As mentioned by the poster above, Yamaha makes some outstanding gear. Another brand of receiver you might want to look into is Marantz, which offers sort of a "classic" sound. Pioneer, Marantz, Onkyo and Yamaha are all solid producers and many units offer streaming audio built in.

Were I in your part of the world I would look for speakers made by KEF, Monitor Audio, Paradigm, or lower level B&W...and i would definetely test the used market. Unlike receivers or cdps, speakers are fairly simple devices and tend to have long lives given a modest amount of maintenance. You can save a bundle by buying used
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2012, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 25,457,746 times
Reputation: 9216
There is no "most popular" music system worth buying. Almost by definition the "most popular" will really be the cheapest, and "most crappy."

The OP said replace her "home entertainment" equipment. Does that include home theater? If it does, I would start with an A/V receiver from Denon, Yamaha, Onkyo, or Pioneer Elite. If she wants to keep her turntable (I would) many mid-range receivers do not have a phono input. But it is easy to add a phono preamp at low cost.

Marc Allen suggested some good speakers. But I would add a few more: NHT, PSB, Definitive Technology, Mirage, and the better Polk models.

To play downloaded music - it depends a bit on where the downloaded music lives. Is it on an iPod? A computer? If it lives on a modern computer running Windows 7, many receivers and some Blu-ray players can access those music files across the computer network. You can also use a "media player" device such as a Logitech Squeezebox.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2012, 09:04 AM
 
640 posts, read 611,582 times
Reputation: 587
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
There is no "most popular" music system worth buying. Almost by definition the "most popular" will really be the cheapest, and "most crappy."

The OP said replace her "home entertainment" equipment. Does that include home theater? If it does, I would start with an A/V receiver from Denon, Yamaha, Onkyo, or Pioneer Elite. If she wants to keep her turntable (I would) many mid-range receivers do not have a phono input. But it is easy to add a phono preamp at low cost.

Marc Allen suggested some good speakers. But I would add a few more: NHT, PSB, Definitive Technology, Mirage, and the better Polk models.

To play downloaded music - it depends a bit on where the downloaded music lives. Is it on an iPod? A computer? If it lives on a modern computer running Windows 7, many receivers and some Blu-ray players can access those music files across the computer network. You can also use a "media player" device such as a Logitech Squeezebox.
Good stuff.

I read that Logitech is discontinuing the Squeezebox though, so anyone that wants one had better purchase immediately.

Squuezebox
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Music
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:34 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top