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Old 01-10-2019, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
11,620 posts, read 7,021,692 times
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Then let's try this link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosalie_Trombley

Louise Harrison apparently had some company,

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 01-10-2019 at 08:07 AM..
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Old 01-10-2019, 08:08 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
Thank you....would have liked to see the "late, great 'Big 8" pages. I'm guessing you have to have a Facebook account.

As soon as the sun went down, CKLW boomed in stronger than most local stations in both Rochester and Albany. Most of my time was spent there or on WLS. Those were the days.
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Old 01-10-2019, 12:26 PM
JPD
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
Ok, that could well be what he meant. Thanks for chiming in.

But there were loads of other artists - many better than most of those listed above. Anyone who would suggest that rock and roll was dead in the early 60s as a result of these events is vastly over-emphasizing their effect on the big picture. With the possible exception of the tragic plane crash.

But even though Don McLean told us that the music died, it didn't. Life and the music went on. It always does. And Elvis, for one, went on to much better later work. Kentucky Rain made me a real Elvis fan....Hound Dog sure didn't.

Rock didn't die....it got better.
I agree with that. I do think the early '60s was a low point, but starting in 1965 rock got much better than it was in its earliest incarnation. It didn't die at the end of the '50s, and contrary to countless other threads on this page, it still isn't anywhere close to dead.

Last edited by JPD; 01-10-2019 at 12:43 PM..
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Old 01-10-2019, 12:34 PM
JPD
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coney View Post
You completely misunderstood. Yes, they got famous after their stint on the Ed Sullivan Show, but that was not their first US appearance or US exposure. Louise Harrison worked very hard plugging her brother's band to get airplay in the mid-west and they did get some airplay. They also had exposure on the Jack Paar show making the adults aware of this crazy phenomenon in England at that time. I had asked some NYC DJs if they were aware of The Beatles before Ed Sullivan and they told me yes, they were aware of them. Some had seen them in England. Afterwards, they all jumped on the bandwagon to make money off of them. Brian and George Martin came to the US first, scouting around for a US record deal. They had a record deal with VeeJay and Swan records long before they made it big in the US and those records were floating around. I have a VeeJay record from 1963. So no, there was a lot of hard work to promote them, way before their Ed Sullivan premiere. Also there's a whole thing about Sid Bernstein booking them at Carneigie Hall and yes, I knew Sid too. Although I was not working in the recording business at the time, I heard all of the stories first hand from the parties involved years later and I did have some involvement with the Beatles' business.
I'm agreeing with you, but to belabor the point, of course they were aware of them. The Ed Sullivan show wasn't the first time Americans ever heard of the Beatles, or the beginning of Beatlemania in the states. It was already underway. If Beatlemania wasn't already underway, there wouldn't be any explanation for why the Ed Sullivan show had an unusually large audience the night they appeared, and there wouldn't be any explanation for why there were hordes of kids greeting their airplane at JFK two days before they appeared on Ed Sullivan.
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Old 01-10-2019, 12:42 PM
JPD
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OzzyRules View Post
I agree. Elvis was always a true and pure rocker til the day he died.
To explain where I'm coming from with my comment that Elvis never returned to rock. My feeling is that, while he did the occasional rock song after his stint in the army, and could still rock, his post-army music career was mostly made up of dopey song from his dopey movies, gospel music, and pandering patriotism like the American Trilogy. Of course, there were some great songs in there, too. In the Ghetto, Suspicious Minds, etc. But he was no longer really a rock and roll artist. He was a star who sang lots of different types of music, including the occasional rock song.
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Old 01-10-2019, 01:23 PM
 
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In 1963, nobody. Their first recording got no radio play until late in Dec. 1963. After the Ed Sullivan show and their first number one hit in early '64, everyone.
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Old 01-10-2019, 06:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPD View Post
Not many until the end of the year. Toward the end of the year they started getting a lot of US media attention for how popular they were in the UK. The Beatles had some regional success in the US in 1963. The Please Please Me single made it into the top 40 in Chicago, for example. But none of their songs were hits nationwide that year. However, consider how many people watched them on Ed Sullivan in early February 1964. All those people weren't just watching like it was any random night of TV. They tuned in specifically because the Beatles were going to appear, thanks to a massive media blitz over the Christmas holiday. So by the end of 1963, they were a big deal in the states.

Here's a good timeline: “Beatles in America”1963-1964 | The Pop History Dig

JPD is right. In my younger years I grew up in Colorado Springs and my favorite station was 1460 KYSN. Right around Christmas of '63 I remember "Please Please Me" for the first time. Loved it! Bought the Veejay 45 at Bon Music Store at the Bon shopping center. Don't forget, you had a bunch of Beatle songs chart in maybe two months time from that date to mid February of 1964 and they were on a variety of labels; MGM, Tollie, Swan, Veejay, and of course Capitol.
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Old 01-10-2019, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weaponized_Funk View Post
Early Beetles were insufferable trash. I blame that template for the vacuous pop nonsense we hear today.
Early Beatles tunes were actually better than they get credit for, you just have to listen to them "differently." If you strip them down and reduce them to their bare melodies and chords, a lot of their early songs are really almost as good as their late tunes.

Back in the early-mid 90's I used to go to this bar in Seattle that often had this brother-sister pair (in their 40's or so) perform sort-of folkish music. The guy sang and played guitar, and the woman sang. One thing they did was do some early Beatles tunes, but they delivered really stripped-down versions. I particularly remember them doing a version of "She Loves You." You can actually turn that into a really nice ballad, and when you do that and strip away the arrangement the Beatles did, you see that it's actually a pretty tune.

After hearing them do that a few times I started playing around with their early tunes on my guitar, and seriously, there's some really nice chord changes and melodies there. Songs like "It Won't Be Long" have some really nice chord changes, and the first 3 songs on Beatles For Sale are as good as any three-song sequence on any of their albums. But as I said, a lot of those songs you have to listen to them differently.
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Old 01-10-2019, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
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And of course, some early Beatles' songs are downright masterpieces.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-NlEKLpR5o
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Old 01-11-2019, 09:36 AM
 
Location: 5,400 feet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
Thank you....would have liked to see the "late, great 'Big 8" pages. I'm guessing you have to have a Facebook account.

As soon as the sun went down, CKLW boomed in stronger than most local stations in both Rochester and Albany. Most of my time was spent there or on WLS. Those were the days.
Here you go:
The Classic CKLW Page!
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