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Old 03-17-2019, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,089 posts, read 2,533,987 times
Reputation: 2006

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1. Jimi Hendrix. He was innovative for sure, but he couldn't sing well, his tone quality is mediocre (grant it he played a while ago) and the lyrics are uninspiring about drug trips or love.

-- better replacement: Robin Trower: He's from the same time but still putting out albums in 2019. He's got a similar 'psychedelic' playstyle, but his tone is much much better (and it get's better over time), he's much more prodigious cause he didn't die young and ventures out into many other styles, and the lyrics are genuinely thought provoking and generally positive (Robin doesn't sing, another guy does).


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0m14xkmQaw

2. Stevie Ray Vaughan: He HAD skill and finesse, he could play fast or slow and make it rich, and his voice complemented his style real well, but he always played clean limiting his tonal variety and he didn't venture out of the texas blues style.

-- better replacement: Joe Bonamassa: Started in the blues genre and still stays in that vain a lot, but he intermingles a lot of different styles into it. His guitar skills are everything Stevie had and then some AND his goes all over the place with different tones. He can sing pretty dang well too. Stevie did a lot to bring blues to to the forefront in the 80s and I think Joe is doing that again in the 2010s. The keyboardist in that video actually played for both Stevie and Joe.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSHSGLsUqio
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Old 03-17-2019, 05:56 PM
 
2,973 posts, read 3,741,957 times
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There is hype about guitar play and personality. Your two examples were hyped for both.


I like all four, though I don't know Bonamassa as well.


Beck could go on either side of the comparison if you want. Put him on the right side of Page.


John McLaughlin doesn't get much mention in the mainstream press but he gets praise from other top guitarists. Put him to the right of Beck.




Clapton, I was never that interested in.
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Old 03-18-2019, 01:39 PM
 
3,284 posts, read 1,634,371 times
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Almost all of them. Eddie, Hendrix, Angus, Clapton etc etc.

Under rated: Malcom young, fast Eddie Clarke, Mick taylor
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Old 03-18-2019, 02:15 PM
 
1,065 posts, read 422,367 times
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Neil Young is an interesting case. He is an excellent acoustic guitar player, but not good on electric and especially not as a soloist. Compare his work in Buffalo Springfield (which is thudding and ham-handed) to that of Stephen Stills and Richie Furay (both far more tasteful).

The early 60s had more than their share of dopey guitar solo break sections, though to be fair, this was prior to the Clapton/Beck/Paige level of playing. Some of the solo guitar sections on the early Kinks and Byrds singles, as well as those by most any garage band (The McCoys’ “Hang on Sloopy” is an especially good example) are sheer nonsense. George Harrison’s solo breaks are at least better than these, if a little klunky sometimes.
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Old 03-18-2019, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
3,624 posts, read 956,808 times
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I love Robin Trower, but he became the guitarist he is today because of Hendrix. Early Procol Harum was Robin in his own element. He played a Gibson, very heavy tone, great sound, but nothing like Hendrix. After he heard Hendrix and saw the equipment he played, it totally changed his focus. Started playing a Strat and a Univibe pedal through Marshall amps. He carried it further because he lived longer. It's impossible to say what Hendrix would have done had he lived.


Hendrix was not a great pure singer, but he had a unique singing/talking style.
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Old 03-18-2019, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
3,624 posts, read 956,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bachslunch View Post
Neil Young is an interesting case. He is an excellent acoustic guitar player, but not good on electric and especially not as a soloist. Compare his work in Buffalo Springfield (which is thudding and ham-handed) to that of Stephen Stills and Richie Furay (both far more tasteful).

The early 60s had more than their share of dopey guitar solo break sections, though to be fair, this was prior to the Clapton/Beck/Paige level of playing. Some of the solo guitar sections on the early Kinks and Byrds singles, as well as those by most any garage band (The McCoys’ “Hang on Sloopy” is an especially good example) are sheer nonsense. George Harrison’s solo breaks are at least better than these, if a little klunky sometimes.

It's interesting that all the great solo's in Beatles songs are done by McCartney or Eric Clapton. Taxman is an example, excellent solo done by Paul, and of course While my guitar gently weeps, beautiful solo done by Clapton. Speaking of the McCoys, Rick Derringer turned out be an excellent lead guitar player. Check out "Rock and roll hoochiekoo" by Rick. very nice song and great solo.
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Old 03-18-2019, 03:45 PM
 
25,092 posts, read 32,149,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
Joe Bonamassa: Started in the blues genre and still stays in that vain a lot, but he intermingles a lot of different styles into it. His guitar skills are everything Stevie had and then some AND his goes all over the place with different tones. He can sing pretty dang well too. Stevie did a lot to bring blues to to the forefront in the 80s and I think Joe is doing that again in the 2010s. The keyboardist in that video actually played for both Stevie and Joe.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSHSGLsUqio
Joe Bonamassa is fabulous. We just bought tickets to see him in August. Stoked!
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Old 03-19-2019, 09:23 AM
 
Location: BFE
1,037 posts, read 290,980 times
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I've never read more wrong on the internet before.
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Old 03-19-2019, 09:24 AM
 
1,065 posts, read 422,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willamette City View Post
It's interesting that all the great solo's in Beatles songs are done by McCartney or Eric Clapton. Taxman is an example, excellent solo done by Paul, and of course While my guitar gently weeps, beautiful solo done by Clapton.
Agreed. If memory serves, McCartney also played the drum backing on "Ticket to Ride," which is excellent and arguably more inventive than anything Ringo did. Though for his time, Ringo was a solid enough drummer and his meat and potatoes basic beat was perfect for what the Beatles usually did. Again, this is all before the era of folks like Ginger Baker and Carl Palmer. In Ringo's time, much the best drumming to be had was via surf instrumental bands like the Ventures and the Surfaris, and he compares well enough with them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Willamette City View Post
Speaking of the McCoys, Rick Derringer turned out be an excellent lead guitar player. Check out "Rock and roll hoochiekoo" by Rick. very nice song and great solo.
Yup -- remember it well. No question it's an improvement on "Sloopy."
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Old 03-20-2019, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
11,344 posts, read 3,807,965 times
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Stevie Ray is considered one of the best ever at his genre --- and I have a few of his tunes on my Ipod - but for my money I'll take Bonamassa over him, any day of the week. Joe can do it all -- hard rock - blues rock - slower blues - acoustic --- he is unbelievable.

Can't comment on the other one. Jimi was great, of course, and I don't know any of Trower's material.
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