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Old 01-03-2009, 01:48 PM
 
Location: in purgurtory in London
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Both great guys, both awesome entertainers. I noticed on a recent thread on Sinatra that it was his enunciation that made him stand apart from his peers and it got me thinking maybe that's what it was. I love Tony Bennet, Dean Martin and a big fan of Mel Torme, but there were certain songs he just owned. My favorite Mel Torme song was "A nightingale sang in Berkely Square". Anyone knows if Frank ever performed it?
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Old 01-03-2009, 05:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raggy dee Ann View Post
Both great guys, both awesome entertainers. I noticed on a recent thread on Sinatra that it was his enunciation that made him stand apart from his peers and it got me thinking maybe that's what it was. I love Tony Bennet, Dean Martin and a big fan of Mel Torme, but there were certain songs he just owned. My favorite Mel Torme song was "A nightingale sang in Berkely Square". Anyone knows if Frank ever performed it?


Tony heads above Frank IMO- I absolutely love the smoothness of his voice and this song is how I feel at times having grown up in this area.

YouTube - Tony Bennett - I Left My Heart In San Francisco
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Old 01-03-2009, 05:57 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
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Like steak & lobster, red & white wines, I enjoy the world more for having them all on the menu! ......
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Old 01-24-2009, 11:44 AM
 
2,751 posts, read 4,716,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raggy dee Ann View Post
Both great guys, both awesome entertainers. I noticed on a recent thread on Sinatra that it was his enunciation that made him stand apart from his peers and it got me thinking maybe that's what it was. I love Tony Bennet, Dean Martin and a big fan of Mel Torme, but there were certain songs he just owned. My favorite Mel Torme song was "A nightingale sang in Berkely Square". Anyone knows if Frank ever performed it?
Just found this thread. I love 'em both. Have seen them both in concert on more than one occasion. Live, there is no comparison. Tony is nowhere near the showman Frank is. Tony, believe it or not, is an introvert, an intellectual type artist. The few times I've seen him, as much as I enjoy his recordings, I'm sorry to say Tony's act was staged, almost programmed. He is not the spontaneous musician Frank is. In a performance, Frank lives a song, has a bigger dramatic range. A ballad, a nightclub song, light swing, swingin' hard, Frank becomes whatever the song indicates to him. Frank has more emotional versatility and profundity, whether he's wailing about loneliness or so happy he's buoyant Frank is there; like a great actor he's experiencing it new, and as it moves him so he is able to moves us too.

As far as recordings, Tony is a consumate artist. You listen to his quieter stuff, the things he did with Bill Evans, his tribute albums to Frank and the one to Billie Holiday and he's impeccable; not that I don't like his big stuff, his movie album stuff, his trademark stuff like, Shadow of your Smile, Who Can i turn to, If I ruled the World, For Once in my Life. But listen to his song for his daughter, Antonia, or This Time the Dream's on Me or Maybe This Time, that's some beautiful music. Tony usually works with a combo, piano, bass, guitar and drums most often, and his voice, with its ability to sing audibly but quietly, with more 'head voice' than Frank, is well-suited to that, where Frank almost always worked with a big band. I did like it when Frank got quiet though, his thing with Jobim was great, and he didn't really do too much jazz. In a career as prolific and textured as his that to me, is the one disappointment. In his later years, maybe from his comeback and later he did a little more of the soft, intimate stuff and it was great. Hey I guess he did enough...
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Old 01-24-2009, 11:57 AM
 
2,751 posts, read 4,716,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raggy dee Ann View Post
Both great guys, both awesome entertainers. I noticed on a recent thread on Sinatra that it was his enunciation that made him stand apart from his peers and it got me thinking maybe that's what it was. I love Tony Bennet, Dean Martin and a big fan of Mel Torme, but there were certain songs he just owned. My favorite Mel Torme song was "A nightingale sang in Berkely Square". Anyone knows if Frank ever performed it?
Sorry, just noticed your question Raggy. Yeah, Frank recorded that classic, and I know you can find it on his four CD Reprise collection, and guess what, he kills it! Surprised? I didn't think so... that whole collection is pretty great. I don't own it at the moment, but I have, and what sets it apart are the song selections, a compilation that Frank and some of his few trusted hand-picked, there are some pretty obscure ones on there.
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Old 01-24-2009, 01:04 PM
 
Location: in purgurtory in London
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Originally Posted by ExPit View Post
Just found this thread. I love 'em both. Have seen them both in concert on more than one occasion. Live, there is no comparison. Tony is nowhere near the showman Frank is. Tony, believe it or not, is an introvert, an intellectual type artist. The few times I've seen him, as much as I enjoy his recordings, I'm sorry to say Tony's act was staged, almost programmed. He is not the spontaneous musician Frank is. In a performance, Frank lives a song, has a bigger dramatic range. A ballad, a nightclub song, light swing, swingin' hard, Frank becomes whatever the song indicates to him. Frank has more emotional versatility and profundity, whether he's wailing about loneliness or so happy he's buoyant Frank is there; like a great actor he's experiencing it new, and as it moves him so he is able to moves us too.

As far as recordings, Tony is a consumate artist. You listen to his quieter stuff, the things he did with Bill Evans, his tribute albums to Frank and the one to Billie Holiday and he's impeccable; not that I don't like his big stuff, his movie album stuff, his trademark stuff like, Shadow of your Smile, Who Can i turn to, If I ruled the World, For Once in my Life. But listen to his song for his daughter, Antonia, or This Time the Dream's on Me or Maybe This Time, that's some beautiful music. Tony usually works with a combo, piano, bass, guitar and drums most often, and his voice, with its ability to sing audibly but quietly, with more 'head voice' than Frank, is well-suited to that, where Frank almost always worked with a big band. I did like it when Frank got quiet though, his thing with Jobim was great, and he didn't really do too much jazz. In a career as prolific and textured as his that to me, is the one disappointment. In his later years, maybe from his comeback and later he did a little more of the soft, intimate stuff and it was great. Hey I guess he did enough...
I believe somewhere I have two VHS videos of a a live concert Frank did. Can't remember where it was, but I'm thinking Argentinia or Brazil and I think Jobim accompanied him, it's been a while since I watched so not sure all the same I like this Jobim influenced stuff. After my father died, one of my brothers and I tried to be as civilised as possible over his Frank Sinatra collection .

It's obvious are not just "any" Frank Sinatra Fan. I'm just sorry I never got to see him live until quite late in his career....I guess Donny Osmond, The Jacksons and then disco was more my style way back when. By the time I began to really appreciate him he, wasn't that active, but I did get to see him before he died.

But as another poster said in this thread, "Like steak & lobster, red & white wines, I enjoy the world more for having them all on the menu!".

Quote:
Tony, believe it or not, is an introvert, an intellectual type artist.
Yes I agree and it's obvious, from his participation in the civil rights movement and his art work that he's cut out of a slightly different cloth from Frank.
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Old 01-24-2009, 01:06 PM
 
Location: in purgurtory in London
3,721 posts, read 3,334,493 times
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Originally Posted by ExPit View Post
Sorry, just noticed your question Raggy. Yeah, Frank recorded that classic, and I know you can find it on his four CD Reprise collection, and guess what, he kills it! Surprised? I didn't think so... that whole collection is pretty great. I don't own it at the moment, but I have, and what sets it apart are the song selections, a compilation that Frank and some of his few trusted hand-picked, there are some pretty obscure ones on there.
I'm putting some finishing touches to my vacation music selection for my IPOD and guess who features quite a bit
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Old 01-24-2009, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
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Frank Sinatra was known for a recording style that in today's studio recording industry is a lost art. Frank would assign the people in his band to individually rehearse their musical parts for a short list of songs in advance of a recording session. The band would not rehearse the songs together until the time of the recording session. Frank's band leader would talk with the band for a few minutes just before starting the first recording session on a song, and often they would make just one and only one recording of a song with Frank and the band. No "second take", no "separate recording tracks". Frank thought the band played the song with more excitement and spirit the first time together, so he would always try to make the first recording of a song the one that went on the record. Frank's thought that if a band tries to reach perfection by recording over and over they would more likely lose their spark and get bored with the song.

Can you imagine how different this is from the today's studio recording practices, where a song is typically manufactured from dozens of separate recorded tracks instead of played by a group of musicians and singers?
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Old 01-24-2009, 01:24 PM
 
2,751 posts, read 4,716,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raggy dee Ann View Post
I believe somewhere I have two VHS videos of a a live concert Frank did. Can't remember where it was, but I'm thinking Argentinia or Brazil and I think Jobim accompanied him, it's been a while since I watched so not sure all the same I like this Jobim influenced stuff. After my father died, one of my brothers and I tried to be as civilised as possible over his Frank Sinatra collection .

It's obvious are not just "any" Frank Sinatra Fan. I'm just sorry I never got to see him live until quite late in his career....I guess Donny Osmond, The Jacksons and then disco was more my style way back when. By the time I began to really appreciate him he, wasn't that active, but I did get to see him before he died.

But as another poster said in this thread, "Like steak & lobster, red & white wines, I enjoy the world more for having them all on the menu!".

Just wanted to add, if you wanna see a great Siantra concert try to fin the one he did in London for Princess Grace in 1971. He was in a good mood, in rare form, looked like he had alotta friends in the audience and Frank was a social guy, right? I know or I've heard he and the Princess really hit it off...



Yes I agree and it's obvious, from his participation in the civil rights movement and his art work that he's cut out of a slightly different cloth from Frank.
Yeah, I saw that concert with Jobim. Frank had the utmost respect for him and it was evident. Frank was of course a 'belter' and his recording with Jobim, '66 or '67? was quite a departure. He said at the time, "If I'd have sung any softer it would have had to be out of my back!" Jobim was a good singer I thought too. This guy created a genre, not quite bossanova but yet pure Brazilian, pure Jobim. Died too young.

My dad left me just about every LP Frank, Tony, Ella, Miles, Getz, Trane, ever recorded. But today, I don't have one of them. My first wife, a lawyer back in PA confiscated them out of spite. What she didn't know was I did not care two dollars for those objects. I only cared, only care about what's on them, and I have since replaced them and more...

But my father was a maniacal Sinatra fan. He was a professional boxer and so he got to meet and hang out with alotta those guys, Sammy, Miles, Vic Damone who I once punced right in the balls when I thought he was really fighting with my dad. (How do you think he hits all those high notes?). But even though he had been a houseguest at Joey Bishop's Beverly Hills place for two weeks one time he never got to meet Frank till one day, maybe ten years after he was out of the ring he happened to be in Atlantic City when Frank had an engagement. He knew the owner of the 500 club where Frank was playing and was brought backstage to meet him. They had a drink and talked about the fight game, (Frank was an avid fan), and then he old man told him, "You know Frank I dug you so much, that I made sure my kid was born on your birthday."

Smiling that Frank Sinatra smile, "Thataway to go Charley!"
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Old 01-24-2009, 01:34 PM
 
2,751 posts, read 4,716,062 times
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Originally Posted by recycled View Post
Frank Sinatra was known for a recording style that in today's studio recording industry is a lost art. Frank would assign the people in his band to individually rehearse their musical parts for a short list of songs in advance of a recording session. The band would not rehearse the songs together until the time of the recording session. Frank's band leader would talk with the band for a few minutes just before starting the first recording session on a song, and often they would make just one and only one recording of a song with Frank and the band. No "second take", no "separate recording tracks". Frank thought the band played the song with more excitement and spirit the first time together, so he would always try to make the first recording of a song the one that went on the record. Frank's thought that if a band tries to reach perfection by recording over and over they would more likely lose their spark and get bored with the song.

Can you imagine how different this is from the today's studio recording practices, where a song is typically manufactured from dozens of separate recorded tracks instead of played by a group of musicians and singers?
Alotta these classic albums were recorded in one or two days. The one he did with Ellington, and his break through album after his nosedive Songs For Swingin' Lovers, same thing...
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