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Old 05-30-2010, 08:11 AM
 
Location: NE San Antonio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlashM View Post
Thanks for participating.
The funny part of it is wiki's article mentions bass riff too. Here's one of those quotes, 'Bruce returned home and wrote the memorable bass riff that runs throughout the song'. I got it off of here.
Thus I sort of don't get where guitar plays and where bass plays (or where they play simultaneoulsy) during this classic famous riff.

The main riff (the DA DA DA DA...) was written on the bass. The song starts with the guitar playing it, the bass and drums come in a few bars later. I believe the song has both the guitar and bass playing the same notes (but the guitar playing higher notes) for most of the song, with the guitar solos and fills added on top. When played live with one guitar, the bass plays the riff alone for much of the song.

It can often be hard to seperate guitar/bass in songs. One trick is to swing the balance of your speakers right or left to seperate instruments in the mix. Headphones also help too.
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Old 05-30-2010, 08:20 AM
 
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Generally speaking the guitar starts the song. This is not always the case though. Here is one where the bass starts it first!

YouTube - Ozzy Osbourne - No More Tears
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Old 05-30-2010, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Best bass riff of all time!


YouTube - Spinal Tap-Big Bottoms
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Old 06-01-2010, 03:14 PM
 
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Here is another classic that starts off with bass first!

YouTube - AC/DC - Live Wire
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Old 06-01-2010, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2RUGGED4YOU View Post
Guitar player here, I am not familiar with all of the other songs you listed but Cream's Sunshine Of Your Love's opening riff is a guitar riff.
It depends on which version. On the studio recording the song kicks off with guitar and bass in unison and a drum fill to punctuate before the full trio hits it. In concerts, Clapton would start the song unaccompanied---sometimes playing it one-note (as he did on the version that opened side two of Live Cream Volume II; sometimes, playing it with a lower counterpoint, as he did to open the song for Cream's original farewell concert at Albert Hall.

On the other hand, there was Clapton's original arrangement of "Spoonful," for Fresh Cream---that one starts with harmonica and bass (both by Jack Bruce) in unison, before Ginger Baker thumps his tom-tom and snare and Clapton joins up. And the same album's original version of Bruce's blues "Sleepy Time Time" began with bass/drums.

Unique blues opening: Canned Heat's "On the Road Again," the studio original---it opens with the droning Indian tamboura that runs all the way through the song, before the song's composer, Alan Wilson, hits the ascending E-minor guitar harmonic that signals the rest of the band (drummer Fito de la Parra, guitarist Henry Vestine, bassist Larry Taylor) to join up.

Canned Heat, "On the Road Again (Woodstock performance)"

Wilson, however, had one problem with the arrangement: the tamboura available in the studio to the Heat wasn't in great shape and couldn't hold the drone for which the instrument is usually used, and since nobody knew where to acquire another one, Wilson simply dubbed three or four parts to get the drone he needed to make the song work. I'm given to understand that the Heat nailed the backing track otherwise in two takes, Wilson playing no guitar other than the opening and closing harmonics (he simply reversed himself to close) but harmonica throughout, then dubbing his familiar falsetto voice . . . In concert, however, Canned Heat played it a little differently: Bob (The Bear) Hite would play the harmonica (he made himself into a fine harmonica player, even if he wasn't the harp player Wilson was) and Wilson would play slide and rhythm guitar, with Vestine (or, at Woodstock, Harvey Mandel, who replaced Vestine at the time) playing lead guitar and the drone eliminated entirely.

Fellow guitar players, note Alan Wilson's primary guitar: a 1954 Les Paul goldtop with a dulled finish. His hand obscures it, but if you've ever seen the clips of Canned Heat's performance at Woodstock, Wilson stuck a small STP-logo sticker between the pickups.
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Old 06-01-2010, 03:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhistlerMCMLV View Post
It depends on which version. On the studio recording the song kicks off with guitar and bass in unison and a drum fill to punctuate before the full trio hits it. In concerts, Clapton would start the song unaccompanied---sometimes playing it one-note (as he did on the version that opened side two of Live Cream Volume II; sometimes, playing it with a lower counterpoint, as he did to open the song for Cream's original farewell concert at Albert Hall.

On the other hand, there was Clapton's original arrangement of "Spoonful," for Fresh Cream---that one starts with harmonica and bass (both by Jack Bruce) in unison, before Ginger Baker thumps his tom-tom and snare and Clapton joins up. And the same album's original version of Bruce's blues "Sleepy Time Time" began with bass/drums.

Unique blues opening: Canned Heat's "On the Road Again," the studio original---it opens with the droning Indian tamboura that runs all the way through the song, before the song's composer, Alan Wilson, hits the ascending E-minor guitar harmonic that signals the rest of the band (drummer Fito de la Parra, guitarist Henry Vestine, bassist Larry Taylor) to join up.



Wilson, however, had one problem with the arrangement: the tamboura available in the studio to the Heat wasn't in great shape and couldn't hold the drone for which the instrument is usually used, and since nobody knew where to acquire another one, Wilson simply dubbed three or four parts to get the drone he needed to make the song work. I'm given to understand that the Heat nailed the backing track otherwise in two takes, Wilson playing no guitar other than the opening and closing harmonics (he simply reversed himself to close) but harmonica throughout, then dubbing his familiar falsetto voice . . .

Fellow guitar players, note Alan Wilson's primary guitar: a 1954 Les Paul goldtop with a dulled finish. His hand obscures it, but if you've ever seen the clips of Canned Heat's performance at Woodstock, Wilson stuck a small STP-logo sticker between the pickups.
And all of us would really like to have that baby, right?LOL......
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Old 06-01-2010, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2RUGGED4YOU View Post
And all of us would really like to have that baby, right?LOL......
I don't know whatever became of Wilson's Les Paul.

But if you want to hand someone the goober of the month award, hand it to me for chickening out of a chance to acquire a still-very-much-playable 1952 Les Paul back in 1998!

I'd just bought me a 1980 SG Custom (I was still into playing SGs then, but now I've grown up ) when I wandered into a music store looking for a new tailpiece and spotted a 1952 Les Paul---complete with no trim ring around the toggle switch and the once-famous trapeze tailpiece-bridge combo---in a glass case. I kept ogling that guitar so that the guy who ran the shop took it out and let me play it. The only thing wrong with it was the finish looked like a layer of broken glass.

No problem, the guy said---if I wanted to buy the guitar, it would cost me a mere $3,000 for the guitar and he'd have the finish redone for me within a week for a mere $300.

I had the money at the time. I absolutely wrestled with myself and finally chickened out.

I've been torturing myself ever since over that one. Even though I now play a beautiful wine-red Les Paul Studio . . .
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Old 06-01-2010, 03:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhistlerMCMLV View Post
I don't know whatever became of Wilson's Les Paul.

But if you want to hand someone the goober of the month award, hand it to me for chickening out of a chance to acquire a still-very-much-playable 1952 Les Paul back in 1998!

I'd just bought me a 1980 SG Custom (I was still into playing SGs then, but now I've grown up ) when I wandered into a music store looking for a new tailpiece and spotted a 1952 Les Paul---complete with no trim ring around the toggle switch and the once-famous trapeze tailpiece-bridge combo---in a glass case. I kept ogling that guitar so that the guy who ran the shop took it out and let me play it. The only thing wrong with it was the finish looked like a layer of broken glass.

No problem, the guy said---if I wanted to buy the guitar, it would cost me a mere $3,000 for the guitar and he'd have the finish redone for me within a week for a mere $300.

I had the money at the time. I absolutely wrestled with myself and finally chickened out.

I've been torturing myself ever since over that one. Even though I now play a beautiful wine-red Les Paul Studio . . .
If you want to play Pre-'60 LP's you are gonna have to pay "the man", right buddy?
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Old 06-01-2010, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2RUGGED4YOU View Post
If you want to play Pre-'60 LP's you are gonna have to pay "the man", right buddy?
Are you kidding? To play a pre-1960 Les Paul now, you'd have to pay the man, the woman, the three kids, and the six grandchildren. At the same time, lump sum. I'm seeing actual pre-1960 Les Pauls going for $100,000 or better now. If I'd leaned more on my guts than on my brains, which managed to go to bed at the wrong time for me then, I'd have bought that 1952 Paul and paid for the refinishing and I'd have had a jewel you couldn't pry out of my cold dead hands. They'd have had to bury me with that guitar if I'd just gutsed up and bought it.

Now, I'll tell you that it doesn't bother me to play a more recent Les Paul. My Studio is a 2006 and it's got the closest you can get to the vintage Les Paul sound and feel, right down to the shape of the back of the neck and the rosewood fretboard and the Burstbucker pickups. (I also like the understated look of the guitar, even if I'm going to change the pickup rings, pickguard, and toggle switch disc to cream-colour just to give her a little elegance.) They're making goldtop Standards now with the same stuff, so I wouldn't object to one, hell, I'd love to add one goldtop Standard to my array now and I'd be happy with just that, my Studio, and my Epiphone Dot.

All of which I prefer to play through either a Fender Frontman 215 amp or a Fender Twin Reverb. Though I may stick with the Frontman 215, maybe double it up and slave a second one for larger halls, because it gives you the Twin Reverb depth and breadth without costing you the Twin Reverb bucks. (I paid $300 for my Frontman 215; the Twin now goes for a grand at minimum, even used.) I like the clean cry of the classic Les Paul, whether playing single-string or triad, I love that crisp clean cry. I don't like distortion and those amps give me a breadth and depth of sound without distortion if I don't want to overdrive much---which I don't. I don't turn the drive up higher than two, that gives me just the right filling without turning the clean cry into a hornet hive on acid.

I was forced to play through a Deluxe Reverb at a club jam Monday night, the guy running the jam wouldn't let me plug in my Frontman (though he had no trouble letting some other guys plug in their own boxes) so I was stuck using their guitarist's Deluxe Reverb. I hated the amp. It was too flat sounding for me, I couldn't just smart a string and have it ring or chime, and plugging me into the vibrato channel was no help because even on the lowest setting the vibrato effect is just too ready to swallow you alive. So I had to bite a little harder on the strings than I normally like to play, and it really compromised me, even though people told me they loved the way I played. The jam band's keyboard player kept throwing my name up for applause and I told him afterward, "If only your guy would have let me plug into my own box---you'd have liked it even more."
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Here's another song where it's hard to tell whether the guitar or bass is playing the main riff:


YouTube - Aerosmith- Back in the Saddle

Apparently Joe Perry plays a 6 string bass in this song for the main riff.
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