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Old 07-26-2007, 09:57 AM
 
13 posts, read 49,417 times
Reputation: 17

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Greetings,

I moved from Chicago, IL to Nashville about 2 months ago. I wanted to share with you some of my reasons for wanting to move to Nashville and my experience so far. Chicago is a wonderful city I grew up there and am a huge Bears fan! I wouldn't ever want to replace that experience, however my family is originally from the Nashville and Memphis area, and the last 3 years or so we were in Chicago I felt a longing to live in a place where there was natural beauty, more land, lower cost of living etc..I had wonderful memories similar to this ideal of my visits to my family in the south. However, I did not want to give up the culture, shopping, diversity etc.. completely either. I have noticed since I've been here that all of these things are in Nashville and appear to be growing, you just have to seek them out. And when you do seek them out and find them it is generally a less expensive, less crowded and stressful experience than trying to deal with the rat race in Chicago. Chicago is just a much bigger city so it makes sense that it is this way. Also in Nashville, we can drive 1 hour and be amongst beautiful hills and lakes, without sitting in a 2 hour traffic jam! It is also refreshing to have people smile and say hello to you here, a rarity in Chicago. Not to mention the weather, after so long of dealing with those winters the cultural experience just didn't balance out our reasons for staying there. But I will always be a Chicagoan at heart, it is a wonderful city, it was just my time to leave it! Go Bears! But I am very happy to be here now.

 
Old 08-05-2007, 10:59 AM
 
Location: cincinnati ohio
1 posts, read 22,796 times
Reputation: 12
Question where should I live

Im a prospective metro police canidate from Cincinnati. I know Nashville has its problems but compared to Cincinnati probably a walk in the park. Where are the nice places to live and raise a family in the nashville area. I tried reading the newspapers and other resources but I would like to hear from the residence what is going on here and where I should live. Also, before I delve any further into this police application I would like to hear some opinions of the metro pd if possible,
 
Old 08-05-2007, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,300 posts, read 15,672,101 times
Reputation: 1597
Quote:
Originally Posted by cincinnati View Post
Im a prospective metro police canidate from Cincinnati. I know Nashville has its problems but compared to Cincinnati probably a walk in the park. Where are the nice places to live and raise a family in the nashville area. I tried reading the newspapers and other resources but I would like to hear from the residence what is going on here and where I should live. Also, before I delve any further into this police application I would like to hear some opinions of the metro pd if possible,
There are nice places all around Nashville. It would help if you could give us a price range (whether you've got a budget of $100K, or $200K, or $400K would make a big difference on what areas we could recommend). I'll just throw out Bellevue as one possibility. It a little pricey, but not quite as much so as some of the other areas (but it's certainly not the cheaper area in Nashville), and it's a pretty nice place to live. I've lived in Bellevue for about twenty years now. There are parks around; all sorts of kids sports stuff; a few nice restaurants; the commute into town is probably the best of any direction; you can drive out into the country in just a few minutes; the elementary and middle school are aceeptable and there doesn't seem to be much trouble going on in them (high school students in Bellevue go to Hillwood High which is a little further towards downtown). I'm not trying to talk you into Bellevue, just mentioning it as one possibility.

As for the Metro police force, I can only tell you my opinion as someone on the outside looking in. I think we have a reasonably good police force for the most part; professional, honest, and delicated. Of course, with any department this size there's quite a lot of politics that goes on. There is a division right now about who will represent the department; the FOP or the Teamsters. It's gotten a little ugly (as we say in the south). I'm not sure what the feeling is about Chief Serpas by the officers on the force; he seems to be liked by most people in Nashville, but there's a smaller group who really dislikes and distrusts him.

The pay rate isn't great and it seems like most of the junior officers moonlight as guards.

As a citizen, my biggest complain about the MPD is they don't really bother with small crime unless they just happen to see it while it's going on. I also wish they will step up the pressure on gangs. Gangs are just starting to be a problem in Nashville. I'd like to see the police go after them, and go after them hard. There are only so many resources, so I'm not sure how successful they're going to be on stopping gang activity.

Oh, and by the way, if you happen to take the job and one day stop a silver Honda Accord for speeding ("Was I really going 85, officer?") and there's a tall white guy driving . . . hey, give the guy a break! ;-)))
 
Old 08-08-2007, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Greater Nashville
1 posts, read 22,737 times
Reputation: 13
Default Nice thread, my perspective

Just thought I'd throw a different perspective out there for people who might be interested.

I live in Charlotte Park (west nashville, but not way out). It is filled with houses built in the 40s to 70s. I call it cops and teachers neighborhood. Maybe lower-middle to middle class, lower class on the fringes (speaking only economically, mind you).

I love it here. Very diverse. I mean really, I don't think you can possibly find more diverse. Vietnamese, Southern Baptist, Southern Indy-Rockers, Korean, Copts, Somali, Iraqi, Iranian, Japanese, Chilean, etc, etc.

I have friends from LA that think they have the best whatever restaurants.
Within a few minutes of my house I can take them to excellent, Sushi, Mexican (real), Indian, Turkish, Vietnamese, Korean, Persian and Barbeque restaurants. I've met folks from Bosnia and New Zealand and talked with them easily.

I suspect that any large city as a similar place. Maybe you just have to look harder for it. Also, there's ALL kinds of music around here. And sports are awesome here. But I don't think you'd get that from even a weekend visit, maybe not even a week, unless you really tried hard and went all around.
 
Old 08-10-2007, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 6,303,104 times
Reputation: 578
I have been to Nashville 4 times- and my opinion of the place has only IMPROVED.

I am from Richmond, Virginia where I'm used to lots of southern hospitality, so I figured going out to Nashville I would find the same. I didn't because Nashville is much faster paced than Richmond and has more people from all over.

The first time I visited Nashville, I was almost disenchanted. Im a musician- so naturally it felt very intimidating. I felt overwhelmed by the hussle and bustle of it. I felt like a rooster out of a coup.

The 2nd time- I tried exploring it more- and it wasn't as bad. I got to get more of the feel of the town. I visited the Parthenon and Andrew Jackson's home. I discovered that Nashvillians really appreciate their history.

The 3rd time- I loved it ! I got to see the Ryman, Country Music Hall Of Fame, Belle Meade, and all the tourist stuff. I got to meet some locals. They were very warm and friendly. I picked up a since that Nashville felt like a 2nd home to me.

Now- I just got back from my 4th visit to Nashville. I'm in love ! I went downtown and visited the beautiful library. I found some cool internet cafes and coffee shops. I went out to Opryland and the great Opry Mills mall. Its super neat. I finally got to play the Bluebird Cafe and Borders Bookstore. I visited Hendersonville, Gallatin and the surrounding areas. I love Vanderbilt U. area.

This time I spent a week in Nashville. You really can't get a clear idea of a place from just a short visit.

My point is- first impressions can be very misleading ! Mine certainly was of Nashville. I love Nashville !
 
Old 08-10-2007, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Chicago
21 posts, read 143,030 times
Reputation: 34
Alleycat,

I live in Chicago(downtown area) and am getting ready to retire and change my life. For 35 years I've lived in the downtown area of Chicago and there are many benefits and a lot of drawbacks, but in the future, I would rather live a simpler lifestyle. What first drew me to looking at Nashville area was a former co worker who moved there and loved it. She really enjoys the life there, both work related and living there. The second thing that made me look there was the 55+
development going up in Mt. Juliet. It looks like a very nice area. I want to be near a city and enjoy the benefits of a city, but I am tired of living in a downtown area. When I retire, I will no longer have to be in an office at 7am, so the proximity to an specific site isn't necessary. However, I do want to be some what close to some normal city activities.

You seem to be a grounded person with great knowledge of the area, what do think of Hendersonville, Mt. Juliet, near the Franklin area? I don't have small kids, so school's aren't that important to me(other than resale), where would you suggest I look?

Thanks for your time.
 
Old 08-11-2007, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,300 posts, read 15,672,101 times
Reputation: 1597
Quote:
Originally Posted by cubsfan View Post
Alleycat,

I live in Chicago(downtown area) and am getting ready to retire and change my life. For 35 years I've lived in the downtown area of Chicago and there are many benefits and a lot of drawbacks, but in the future, I would rather live a simpler lifestyle. What first drew me to looking at Nashville area was a former co worker who moved there and loved it. She really enjoys the life there, both work related and living there. The second thing that made me look there was the 55+
development going up in Mt. Juliet. It looks like a very nice area. I want to be near a city and enjoy the benefits of a city, but I am tired of living in a downtown area. When I retire, I will no longer have to be in an office at 7am, so the proximity to an specific site isn't necessary. However, I do want to be some what close to some normal city activities.

You seem to be a grounded person with great knowledge of the area, what do think of Hendersonville, Mt. Juliet, near the Franklin area? I don't have small kids, so school's aren't that important to me(other than resale), where would you suggest I look?

Thanks for your time.
Thanks for the compliment. I should warn you however that I'm a lifelong Cardinals fan. ;-)

Each of the area you mentioned are nice areas for the most part. Each of them have their good points, as well as a few bad points. I don't really know as much about Mt. Juliet. Twenty-five years ago Mt. Juliet was just a "country spot" in the road on the way to Lebanon, but it's grown a lot since then.

Each of the areas have their own personality (and I hope it stays that way). If you like boating or fishing, then Hendersonville has Old Hickory Lake and it just big enough to have most of what anyone needs without being too large. Even thought a large number of the people who live there work in Nashville, it has it's own separate identity. Mt. Juliet isn't that far from Priest Lake and has a number of newer developments, most of them nice from what I hear. Franklin was, and to a certain extent still is, a great, almost classic, small southern town. If you like a nice choice of restaurants, artsy stuff, and that sort of thing, then Franklin can be a great place to live. It has gotten a little crowded and a little pricey in the past couple of decades. All in all, I wouldn't have any problem living in either of the areas.

A few other places you might consider: Pleasant View, northwest of downtown Nashville; Kingston Springs, west of Nashville a little past Bellevue (which is where I live); and some of the small towns or communites north of Nashville. You probably want to stay away from the areas south of Nashville; not because there's anything wrong with them, just that the corridor between Nashville and Murfreesboro has almost become one huge subdivision to my way of thinking. However, if you think you might want to attend some adult college classes for whatever reason, then Murfreesboro, with MTSU there, might be worth looking at.

That's about the best I can do. It's really hard to recommend one place over another unless someone has some "hardline" specifics in mind, and even then it's difficult. Probably the best idea is to come visit for a week; spend a day or so in each of the areas -- drive around a little, talk to the people, visit the recreation areas, that sort of thing -- just to get a general feel for each area.

If schools and a daily commute are not prime factors, then you have a lot of choices in the area.
 
Old 08-11-2007, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Chicago
21 posts, read 143,030 times
Reputation: 34
Thanks very much for your reply. I appreciate the guidance to some areas I didn't know about. Hopefully, I'll be able to get away and come down the end fo Sept/early Oct. Do you have any recommendations for hotels in the city/area? I'm not opposed to staying a few days each in several different hotels in different areas.

thanks again.

Last edited by cubsfan; 08-11-2007 at 07:48 PM.. Reason: forgot to add something
 
Old 08-14-2007, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Nashville/Hollywood
42 posts, read 152,053 times
Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
I am not sure what makes up a typical southerner, but I do know that my personal experience has been that most transplants are 3 of 3 things. 1. Very interesting & wonderful people. 2. Astounded by the lower cost of real estate in the southeast and 3. Often exhibits delusions

To me what makes a southerner a southerner is the fact that even now, a good majority of the Southeast is still inhabited primarily by families with a long lineage and personal connection to the land. Most chunks of the population lives on the coasts or up North where manufacturing drew migrants ( many Southern actually) decades ago. I live in CA now and honestly, fully half the people I meet out here are from either places like New Jersey or Ohio. The actual natives got shoved out a long time ago once old money from the East Coast marched in.

The South has been avoided by several things from this kind of surging in-migration until recently from a few things, namely painful memories from the race problems in the 60's as well as a long-standing personification in hollywood and the media as backwards, old-fashioned, and racist. This in effect has insulated the South from some of the rampant crazy rise in the cost of living that has crippled the living situation for young families and the middle class in those areas- primarily the Northeast and West Coast.

It has only been due to the extraordinarily high prices in other places that has forced people to look inward. That single aspect concerns me. I can almost guarantee that most of these people who are looking to move here are perfectly happy where they live now and are only considering this move because they can't afford it, or they're retiring and can't stomach 30 years of paying taxes where they are now. So what you get are masses of people who probably really care less about the people who live there and the culture that took centuries to develop and more about getting a cheap house, or a retirement property on the lake, or something like that.

In conclusion, these people are moving here because they can't make it where they live now. They are perfectly willing to toss aside whatever allegiance or personal investment they have where they currently reside. They have no attachment to the land or their home. That's really different from most people in the South,who love where they live, and would never leave.
Exactly. Those kind of people really bug me..I guess because my parents are those kind of people too. I was born and raised in SoCal (near LA) till I was 12. We were barely getting by so my parents decided to sell when the housing market appreciated in 95' (too bad they couldn't see the future...we sold for $150K -- the house is worth over $500K now...'nuff said). We moved to Lebanon, of all places...it was a really sh---y time for me. I had to move from all of my family (incl my uncle who was like the sibling I never had) and everything I knew to this weird place 2000miles+ away..not to mention I was always the different one in school..apparently everyone else was related ( la Deliverance). We moved house three times before finally moving to Nashville when I started highschool. My parents decided to homeschool me, since I wasn't doing well in school before that (gee, I wonder why...with people always treating me differently and calling me Yankee even tho I'm not even from the North, durr). So after highschool I hightailed my ass out of here to study in Canada. Now I've graduated and am back here, forever rancorous, working my way out so I can move back to California. So to all parents...don't be selfish. Think about your kids (esp if they're teenagers) before you think about yourself. Make sure they're okay with moving before considering anything. You don't want your kids to be f-d up like me, seriously.

Quote:
I guess I could eat my own words, being a Tennessean living in CA.
I guess it depends why you moved to California. Was it because you like it better than TN, was it job-related...?

Quote:
But out of all the people from other areas, I'm probably the smallest 'minority' in this area. I can go for sometimes 6 months or a year without hearing a southern accent.
I've been a minority for 10years. There are way more minorities in CA (it's diverse) tho, so it's easy to blend in...nothing like TN where people ask you where you're from if you don't have a Southern accent. I get that all the time even in Nashville (a big village *mhm*..I mean city).

Quote:
On the other hand, I can hear a " ooo-yah, dontcha' knooo' Midwestern accent on every corner, but nothing even remotely close to what I sound like. That to me is very telling and speaks of a people who are attached to their homeland and history.
I guess you haven't been to Fontana (aka Fontucky, home of the Hell's Angels) or up to the San Joaquin Valley (Bakersfield, Stockton, Fresno, Modesto, Merced..etc). You can hear Southern accents in all those places.

Quote:
Simply put, Southerners seem to have far less reasons to relocate somewhere else as so many on the coasts seem to do constantly.
That's just an assumption. If there was a realestate boom here, you can bet there would be droves of Southerners cashing in and moving elsewhere...the thing is tho, those types of people are never the majority anywhere. Most people aren't gamblers or risk-takers. Most people don't want to move away from family, friends, and everything they've ever known.

Quote:
Southern people are perhaps the last vestige of an original culture left in America.
If we want to be technical about it, the only original cultures in America are the Native American ones.
 
Old 08-14-2007, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
39 posts, read 150,583 times
Reputation: 22
I MISS NASHVILLE!!!! So very much. Grew up in Detroit, like mr2007. Moved to Nashville in 1995 and only stayed a year due to my damn husband (ex now!) didn't like it because "it's too hot and too far away from my mother!". We moved back to MI, with me kicking and screaming.

I now live in Hawaii and hate it here. Talk about being discriminated against!!! I'd give anything to live back in the south and I grew up a Yankee!
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