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Old 06-22-2012, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Music City, USA
5,076 posts, read 4,893,197 times
Reputation: 4653

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandoncraig View Post
Hipsters are helping to make Nashville truly Music City USA and not just country/singer songwriter/religious music.
Helping, sure. But that scene was going on well before the hipsters arrived.
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Old 06-23-2012, 12:34 AM
 
47 posts, read 50,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvols View Post
Helping, sure. But that scene was going on well before the hipsters arrived.
True and Nashville has historically produced a lot of pop music and years ago lots of R & B.

I'm not sure how much the public outside Nashville knew about the non country side of things. But ever since the Black Keys and especially Jack White moved to town, you read all about Nashville's hipster music scene.

Last year, Rolling Stone said Nashville had the best music scene in the country. You didn't read things like that in the national press until the hipsters arrived.
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Old 06-23-2012, 12:42 AM
 
Location: Music City, USA
5,076 posts, read 4,893,197 times
Reputation: 4653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandoncraig View Post
True and Nashville has historically produced a lot of pop music and years ago lots of R & B.

I'm not sure how much the public outside Nashville knew about the non country side of things. But ever since the Black Keys and especially Jack White moved to town, you read all about Nashville's hipster music scene.

Last year, Rolling Stone said Nashville had the best music scene in the country. You didn't read things like that in the national press until the hipsters arrived.
Hey, I don't doubt you there. But part of the problem is that we're replacing one stereotype (Nashville is nothing but Country) with another (Nashville's "other" music scene is entirely fueled by hipsters). Neither one is true. Not now. Not 20 years ago.

Honestly, I don't have an issue with hipsters here. I don't think they are a negative on the city. But for the positives they might help create (artistic, creative minds moving here), we still don't get the cred without some kind of inaccurate label from the mass media elsewhere.

Native Nashvillians like myself feel a bit cheated that we don't get any recognition for what we actually are.
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Old 06-23-2012, 01:04 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN (USA)
749 posts, read 1,054,712 times
Reputation: 764
Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvols View Post
The interest in quality food, beer, music (sometimes), and local business are the positives....but you don't have to be a hipster to have good taste.

My problem with hipsters is the big wannabe following. They are often the d-bags that are vocally anti-mainstream...so once something they like becomes mainstream, they no longer like it. They're the ones that begin a sentence with "well, you've probably never heard of them/it" that annoys the living hell out of me. And they like to pass themselves off as unique, although they share a collective thought process.


Living in Knoxville during college, I got my first exposure to what hipsters were. It was about 5 years ago, and the "hipster" sensation hadn't gone mainstream (at least not so much in K-town). At first I started noticing guys in broad pattern plaid shirts and tight jeans...only to find out later they were wearing girls jeans...and many times the jeans didn't even reach their ankles. Bizarre.

Well, then at work (I worked in a college apartment's leasing office), we had this new guy come in. He was a skater...we all knew that. It was only later that we put the pieces together and figured out he was super hipster.

The first evidence came with the musical choice. We had a CD player and in the evenings, we could choose to listen to (pretty much) whatever we wanted. Being that most of the staff was made up of college students, we had a wide variety of tastes and I would say as a whole we knew a lot about music. New guy decides he wants to play something. Sure...go right ahead. What is it? "Well, you've probably never heard of them...." "Try me." "The Flaming Lips?" "Dude...they've been around for more than 20 years. They played at Bonnaroo. I saw them." *Dumbfounded look on his face* (He never played them again during his couple month long tenure at the job -- always insisting on something that we definitely hadn't heard of -- because most of the time it was awful)

Then there were the subtle debates or discussions, where he would ask you your opinion on something, then always take a contrarian position. A coworker and I came to this conclusion after he asked both her and I the same question on different occasions (what era of Beatles music do you like)...we gave different answers, and so did he...both times taking nearly the opposite of whatever we said.

Then there were politics. He was a Ron Paul supporter...until more and more people around campus started supporting him. Then he dropped Ron Paul (too mainstream) in favor of an obscure candidate that none of us had ever heard of.


I'm not suggesting that all hipsters are like this enormous d-bag, but I've met more than enough that are. People like this try to be unique (at least to us outsiders) to the point of aggravation. Some of the holier-than-thou attitudes that come out of this clan are reprehensible.


If hipsters want to go take somewhere over....maybe they should go to La Vergne...where they could actually make improvements.
This is kind of hilarious to me. I'm a late Gen Xer and I find it funny to hear that people are now tossing out bands like The Flaming Lips to sound "cool" and ahead of the curve. Honestly, that guy just sounds like a pompous douche. I know Nashvillians who may look like "hipsters" at first glance, but they would rather engage people in actual conversations about the career of The Flaming Lips than cite them as some obscure reference to one-up someone.

Last edited by ariesjow; 06-23-2012 at 01:33 AM..
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Old 06-23-2012, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Music City, USA
5,076 posts, read 4,893,197 times
Reputation: 4653
Quote:
Originally Posted by ariesjow View Post
This is kind of hilarious to me. I'm a late Gen Xer and I find it funny to hear that people are now tossing out bands like The Flaming Lips to sound "cool" and ahead of the curve. Honestly, that guy just sounds like a pompous douche. I know Nashvillians who may look like "hipsters" at first glance, but they would rather engage people in actual conversations about the career of The Flaming Lips than cite them as some obscure reference to one-up someone.
Well, that's what was so ridiculous about it. No, the Flaming Lips aren't the Red Hot Chili Peppers...but in a college atmosphere where people go out of their way to explore their musical roots (especially in the internet age)...to "name drop" The Flaming Lips? C'mon, man....

And yes, he was a magnificent douche.

That wasn't intended to be a condemnation of all hipsters, but rather a highlight of what the worst tend to act like. The person that perpetuates the stereotype.

I think it's important for people to remember that there are plenty of people with weird, eclectic music taste, love good and interesting food creations, and support local small businesses that are NOT hipsters. And hipsters don't define that culture.
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Old 06-25-2012, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Hendersonville, TN
2,881 posts, read 3,524,943 times
Reputation: 1704
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcredux View Post
Nope.

In the 2012 payscale survey, it had the dubious honor of providing a negative estimated return to graduates -- that is, students were financially worse off for attending. It's mainly for local ne'er-do-wells who don't stray from the nest and transplant ne'er-do-wells who get suckered into its "music business" program. Few reputable employers (reputable, as in, they actually pay you) take it seriously enough to recruit undergrads from there.

Athens of the South, baaaaaybeeee!
OK...again, I find myself in the uncomfortable postion of defending my alma mater's sworn rival...

I will give you the point about Belmont having a negative return (I haven't seen those statistics, you didn't link to them, but I trust you enough to think you didn't just pull them out of thin air...if you say it does, then I'll assume you're right), but I don't think it's fair to characterize their student body as "ne'er do wells". If their student body has a stereotype, the one I hear is that they are politically left leaning/liberal arts/music business based and Christian eclectic. And even that's not probably fair. Likewise, I don't know how you'd define "reputpable employers" but I know a number of Belmont grads working in very good positions in accounting firms, banks, and law firms. It isn't Belmont College of Music, Small Engine Repair, and Hair Styling.

That said, I do think Belmont went through a major face lift in the 90s turning itself into a liberal arts/business/music industry centered University from a liberal arts/bible-based "college". I think they got a lot of good publicity and attention from those efforts. Now that they've turned themselves into the thing they sought out to be, I do agree that perhaps they've lost something in doing so... And maybe that's the point you'e trying to make?
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Kenai Peninsula, AK
5,551 posts, read 9,205,469 times
Reputation: 1980
Hipsters are all over the south, not just Nashville. Cruise around Knoxville, Greenville, Asheville, or Boone to see. I don't think hipsters are defining Nashville, but really hipsters are helping to define southern Appalachia and the South strip area that runs from Nashville to Chattanooga to Atlanta.
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Old 06-28-2012, 11:30 PM
 
421 posts, read 273,544 times
Reputation: 257
I was visiting town in the fall of 2010 at the Red Door in East Nashville. I have gone to this bar about 10 times over the past 10 years, and it's usually low-key. Then, suddenly, in burst a group of about 8 hipsters, the guys all dressed as Last Waltz-era Bob Dylans and the girls all dressed as Indians. One brought a tambourine with ribbons tied to it. It was ridiculous.

Last edited by JMT; 06-29-2012 at 12:35 AM.. Reason: No profanity, please.
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