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Old 10-24-2007, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
624 posts, read 2,852,531 times
Reputation: 332

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Will the city eventually tear down (or make into condos) these major public housing developments that are usually hot beds for crime? Specifically I'm wondering about the big Casey home development near downtown/East Nashville that is RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER from what I think are overpriced renovated homes such as on Fatherland, etc...also, around Edgehill/8th ave there are projects...this property is becoming more valuable I guess because I see housing prices going up, but I don't really care to live that close to the projects just to be close to Nashville...am I the only one that is surprised by some of the high real estate prices I'm seeing for houses that are within walking or drive-by distance to the 'hood?
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Old 10-24-2007, 04:47 PM
 
177 posts, read 439,506 times
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A friend of mine went to Africa, and was surprised to see people killing over "land". He comes back and says..."Glad we don't do that here." But we do. It's not done with guns, but with property value. It's a repeated scenario. 1st, you move the artists in. 2nd, it becomes the "trendy" place to be. 3rd, once this label sticks, rehabilitaions take place by investors. 4th, forums, meetings, and private debates take place to find ways to make the place "safer". 5th, plans are implemented to crack down on crime (finally), tear down crumbling bldgs, and move the residents to "better housing". 6th, investors chime in and build banks, restaurants, apartments, etc. 7th, housing prices are through the roof. 8th, the once hip area where artist canno longer live, is now dominated by yuppies driving Mercedes. 9th the artist find a new area that is not trendy where they can collaborate and create...thus it begins all over again. Check out Chelsea and Harlem in Manhattan. Cabrini Green in Chicago. The term for it is "gentrification". It happens all the time.
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Old 05-22-2009, 11:28 AM
 
5 posts, read 11,133 times
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If you perceive your home as investment which you wish to have increase in value, than Gentrification is good. If you do not see your home as an investment and you want to keep the value of your property low, than Gentrification is bad.

I purchased a home on Villa Place back in 2002 displacing known drug dealers in the neighborhood. I guess some are going to perceive that as a bad thing and some that will perceive that as a good thing. I enjoy the diversity of my neighborhood, and by no means do I want the neighborhood to be all white. In fact, I will be quite happy if the neighborhood remains majority black. But in any case Villa Place has gotten safer over the last several years, and I believe that is a good thing because everyone deserves to live in a safe neighborhood. Some might say that gentrification is some evil insidious phenomenon, other s might say it is progress.
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Old 05-23-2009, 02:21 AM
 
1,206 posts, read 1,123,248 times
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Default a house divided...

Quote:
Originally Posted by fightcrib View Post
If you perceive your home as investment which you wish to have increase in value, than Gentrification is good. If you do not see your home as an investment and you want to keep the value of your property low, than Gentrification is bad.

I purchased a home on Villa Place back in 2002 displacing known drug dealers in the neighborhood. I guess some are going to perceive that as a bad thing and some that will perceive that as a good thing. I enjoy the diversity of my neighborhood, and by no means do I want the neighborhood to be all white. In fact, I will be quite happy if the neighborhood remains majority black. But in any case Villa Place has gotten safer over the last several years, and I believe that is a good thing because everyone deserves to live in a safe neighborhood. Some might say that gentrification is some evil insidious phenomenon, other s might say it is progress.
from the papers i've read in the last two weeks, i am under the impression that gentrification is not working. birmingham, ala is in a real mess---memphis, along w/ several major metros, is having similar problems. the poor, lower middle income, and, possibly middle income might bring this concept to fruition; however, the mid to upper income brackets want little to do w/ it. i really do not see how anyone can blame them.
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Old 05-23-2009, 10:47 AM
 
Location: East Nashville/Inglewood
879 posts, read 1,617,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingchef View Post
from the papers i've read in the last two weeks, i am under the impression that gentrification is not working. birmingham, ala is in a real mess---memphis, along w/ several major metros, is having similar problems. the poor, lower middle income, and, possibly middle income might bring this concept to fruition; however, the mid to upper income brackets want little to do w/ it. i really do not see how anyone can blame them.
That's funny, better tell all my neighbors who are attorneys, music row professionals, nurses and doctors to move to Williamson County. Let's see crime has dropped in East Nashville by 20% each in the last two years. Even in this climate there are 5 houses on the streets beside me being re-habbed ...I see young mothers and families in the park near me that used to more infamous for drug dealing and prostitution...yeah, not working AT ALL...you guys who motor into town and right out who's only perceptions of what is going on is by what they read in the newspapers crack me up. If you actually lived here you would notice major improvements (I don't want to get into the political ramifications of gentrification, which seem to come from the people who want to keep the status quo and 4 cars in their garage). Anyway, as far as Cayce homes, that is prime real estate. I forsee a major political battle if the state tries to remove them, so I don't see them going away anytime soon. The only issue I have with them, is the felons and criminals that leach back into them. I think they should be regulated better and drug tests should be mandatory.

Last edited by yank283; 05-23-2009 at 11:19 AM..
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Old 05-23-2009, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
4,679 posts, read 5,191,448 times
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We helped do a re-hab in East Nashville. It was orig. bought by an investor from Gallatin for $120k. It was one of those old stone houses that had maybe a total of 1000 sqft if you included the basement.

They rehabed it, brought it up to about 1800 sqft and last time I checked the price tag on the house was in the 300-400k range.

You'll probably never see people from Brentwood or Green Hills in East Nashville but alot of the younger, trendy people are buying those houses up fast. Soon you won't be able to touch anything south of Inglewood for under $200k.
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Old 05-23-2009, 06:23 PM
 
Location: East Nashville/Inglewood
879 posts, read 1,617,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TNRyan23 View Post
We helped do a re-hab in East Nashville. It was orig. bought by an investor from Gallatin for $120k. It was one of those old stone houses that had maybe a total of 1000 sqft if you included the basement.

They rehabed it, brought it up to about 1800 sqft and last time I checked the price tag on the house was in the 300-400k range.

You'll probably never see people from Brentwood or Green Hills in East Nashville but alot of the younger, trendy people are buying those houses up fast. Soon you won't be able to touch anything south of Inglewood for under $200k.
Yeah and a lot of these people are not from Nashville (or TN for that matter). Seems like people that have grown up here have never gotten over the stigma that this is a place never to venture to. Heck, my wife grew up in west Nashville and she said she probably could count on one hand the times she came to East Nashville while growing up.
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Old 05-23-2009, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
4,679 posts, read 5,191,448 times
Reputation: 1960
Quote:
Originally Posted by yank283 View Post
Yeah and a lot of these people are not from Nashville (or TN for that matter). Seems like people that have grown up here have never gotten over the stigma that this is a place never to venture to. Heck, my wife grew up in west Nashville and she said she probably could count on one hand the times she came to East Nashville while growing up.
When I first moved to Nashville back in the 2000-2001 time frame I pretty much stayed in Madison/Inglewood/East Nashville areas and hardly ever went to the west side. I'm comfortable there although I have to admit that after living in Hendersonville for a year, It would take getting used to again.
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Old 05-25-2009, 01:53 AM
 
1,206 posts, read 1,123,248 times
Reputation: 717
Quote:
Originally Posted by yank283 View Post
That's funny, better tell all my neighbors who are attorneys, music row professionals, nurses and doctors to move to Williamson County. Let's see crime has dropped in East Nashville by 20% each in the last two years. Even in this climate there are 5 houses on the streets beside me being re-habbed ...I see young mothers and families in the park near me that used to more infamous for drug dealing and prostitution...yeah, not working AT ALL...you guys who motor into town and right out who's only perceptions of what is going on is by what they read in the newspapers crack me up. If you actually lived here you would notice major improvements (I don't want to get into the political ramifications of gentrification, which seem to come from the people who want to keep the status quo and 4 cars in their garage). Anyway, as far as Cayce homes, that is prime real estate. I forsee a major political battle if the state tries to remove them, so I don't see them going away anytime soon. The only issue I have with them, is the felons and criminals that leach back into them. I think they should be regulated better and drug tests should be mandatory.
as my statement centered around gentrification, and you contradict yourself regarding the topic and your desire to discuss it, i see no reason to get into a "pissing" contest w/ you concerning the issue. nevertheless, the "leaching back" of felons (not mutually exclusive of criminals) could be seen as a strike against gentrification. CRACK: an illegal drug; CRACK UP: flying in your plane upside down in east nashville; alt: laughing uncontrollably. put up a little fencing w/ concertina wire, a few flood lights, some drug testing, and just call the gentrification, brushy mountain!
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Old 05-27-2009, 12:43 PM
 
5 posts, read 11,133 times
Reputation: 10
"as my statement centered around gentrification, and you contradict yourself regarding the topic and your desire to discuss it, i see no reason to get into a "pissing" contest w/ you concerning the issue. nevertheless, the "leaching back" of felons (not mutually exclusive of criminals) could be seen as a strike against gentrification. CRACK: an illegal drug; CRACK UP: flying in your plane upside down in east nashville; alt: laughing uncontrollably. put up a little fencing w/ concertina wire, a few flood lights, some drug testing, and just call the gentrification, brushy mountain!"Wow that did not make any sense. What is this, freestyle poetry night in East Nashville? Brushy brushy what??
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