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Old 11-21-2007, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
624 posts, read 2,851,688 times
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I'm looking at some property near the Cumberland River on the East side of Nashville...some data I found says it is on a floodplain...what does this mean for me exactly? I figure it means the property could flood, but as far as insurance, extra costs of ownership, etc what would it mean to me? Also, when was the last time the Cumberland flooded? Is this likely to happen? Thanks!
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Old 11-21-2007, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,291 posts, read 15,817,652 times
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Yes, it's likely to happen. When, no one knows. Floods are categorized by their likeliness to occur in a certain time periods. For example, a 100-year flood is a major flood that has the probability of happening at least once every 100 years. A 10-year flood has the likelihood of happening at least once every 10 years (and would be a lesser flood than a 100-year flood).

And flood insurance won't be optional if you have a mortgage. The mortgage company will required you to have it; if you don't, they will purchase it and add it to your mortgage payments. The Federal government sells flood insurance; it's relatively inexpensive, but it is an added cost.

Would I buy a piece in Tennessee where the actual dwelling was in a floodplain. NO WAY. I might consider a piece of property where part of the land was in a floodplain but not the house location (say, a steep site near a river).

By the way, flood maps are updated on regular intervals. If you buy a piece of property close to a current floodplain but not in it, don't be too surprised if the next time they update the flood maps that you get a letter from your mortgage company saying (surprise!) you are now.

All in all, buying property in a floodplain isn't worth it unless a) you're getting the deal of a lifetime, and b) you know exactly what you're getting into and can handle the risks.
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Old 11-21-2007, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Michigan
43 posts, read 115,576 times
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I'm glad somebody asked this question; i've been meaning to. So... what are the implications for the Brush Hill area of Inglewood? Would that be considered flood plain, or is the bluff high enough to not be risky...
Seems like a bunch of houses in that area are coming on the market.
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Old 11-21-2007, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,291 posts, read 15,817,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whithill View Post
I'm glad somebody asked this question; i've been meaning to. So... what are the implications for the Brush Hill area of Inglewood? Would that be considered flood plain, or is the bluff high enough to not be risky...
Seems like a bunch of houses in that area are coming on the market.
IngleDave might be able to tell you if he finds this thread (he's lived there for 30 years or so). If not, send him a private message. I'm sure he's be willing your questions if he knows.

I don't know the Brush Hill area myself. I lived in Inglewood for a year but that was back in 1984.
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Old 11-22-2007, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Nashville
598 posts, read 1,269,202 times
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Oh, I DO know the area. Most of the Brush Hill area is on a high bluff of the river. In my general area, from Cornelia Fort Airpark to Madison, the only areas likely to flood would be the lower end (closer to Shelby Bottoms) of Moss Rose (you probably should avoid this misplaced development, anyway) and perhaps the end of Cedarwood (off Brush Hill where a creek empties into the Cumberland). Other than that, if any of the Brush Hill area floods, we're ALL in trouble. Brush Hill, most of Moss Rose and the hidden gems in Madison in the vicinity of Spring Hill cemetery are probably the most unlikely places to flood. If we flooded in this area, I'd call Noah, fast. The answer to your question is no, absolutely not, Brush Hill will not flood. Across the river in the Pennington Bend, well, that's another story. Living on the river side of Brush Hill is a dream of mine, but probably won't happen. I've often checked out houses for sale just so I can go to the backyards and look at those spectacular views....from way high up. If you have an interest and opportunity DO go check out these places. They're rarities indeed and ultra-convenient to Briley Parkway and all points beyond.
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Old 11-22-2007, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Michigan
43 posts, read 115,576 times
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THanks, Ingledave. We love that area too. What do you mean by the "hidden gems" in Madison -- would that be up in Montague? Pretty neighborhood, despite some weird apartment buildings.

Where's the misplaced development at the lower end of Moss Rose?
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Old 11-23-2007, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Nashville
598 posts, read 1,269,202 times
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One of the most interesting hidden areas, and I mean hidden, areas I discovered ago in Madison is at the back of Spring Hill cemetery. It's not publicly accessible, but I discovered it with a friend maybe 40 years ago. A buddy of mine and I were tossing M-80s from the catwalk under the old Briley Parkway bridge (much to the chagrin of the fishermen on the Donelson-side bank) and decided to work our way down the banks of the Cumberland several hundred yards. We then climbed the bank (oh, what were we thinking) and ended up in what seemed like a time warp as we ended up in the yard of a Tudor mansion on the bluff, complete with old black Rolls-Royce (or what appeared so to a young'n in the 60s) and white peacocks. Further down the private road was yet another very large tudor residence, completely hidden from the city. As we walked further we went through the Madison Water Works and ended up on Gallatin Road. If you've ever noticed the two large stone pillars at Spring Hill, that's the entrance. It's private unfortunately, but we didn't exactly know that as we climbed the bluff. Probably wouldn't have stopped us anyway; people were more forgiving and more trusting back then. Much of this can be seen from the river which we did as we sometimes would launch our large rubber raft at the Old Hickory dam and float the entire day down to Shelby Park where our nervous mothers would pick us poor sun-scorched selves up.

The other area of Madison (I'm recalling this from high school days) was at the very end of Due West Avenue. I don't remember the name of the street but there are a couple of streets on the river that had very unique houses backing up to the river. It was always one of my favorite areas then. It may have certainly changed, but I had several friends who lived in the area and we always enjoyed the patios on the river.

On the theme of looking back to my early days of exploration, Moss Rose dead-ended into a large flood plain area where Cooper's Creek emptied into the Cumberland. (It's now near the north entrance to the Shelby Bottom Greenway. It was huge area where we'd ride our bikes, walk, launch our Estes rockets (yes, with an occasional mouse payload) and explore. The creek was a fascinating, almost prehistoric looking area that thrilled us as kids. It was an area that was illustrated when the first drawings of the proposed Opryland theme park came out. The park was to extend across the river into this area. That never panned out and in the years hence (late 70s), a neighborhood of modern homes was constructed on that opposite bank from what is now Opry Mills. The years haven't been so kind to these structures, but lately, more pride seems to be taken in them. One interesting aside is that when construction began, I recall biking to the creek and seeing the archaeological dig that took place and actually looking into the graves of ancient native Americans, skulls and all. To this day, I'm rather proud of myself for not having one on a bookshelf somewhere as there was no on around to stop me had I been so inclined. Another memory was of a large white ranch house at the then end of Moss Rose with 5 Cadillacs in a large carport. I'd go on with this, but to this day, I'd be afraid to talk about that. lol.

I hope my trip down memory lane didn't bore anyone, but it was good for me.

The deep woods of Inglewood was a wonderful place to grow up. I'm really happy to be back.
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Old 11-23-2007, 06:50 AM
 
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I would be very leery of buying on or even near the floodplain in Nashville. There is a dam upstream (wolf creek?) that is in a dangerous condition and would flood a lot of low lying areas if (when?) it burst. So this would be much worse than just a 100 year flood that came from rain alone.
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Old 11-26-2007, 03:02 PM
 
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I felt like I had to comment on this thread since I know a little about the subject. First off Scotttv the implications of living on a floodplain depend largely on which FEMA designation it has...I mean realistically if you are in what they call Zone X you are in a 500 year floodplain and that is really nothing to worry about, I would also say this about most 100 year (Zone A_) areas. Now to touch a little on Alleycats response. Because of the nomenclature of hydraulics/hydrology many people think that a 100 year storm or flood event is one that happens one time every hundred years or so. This is untrue, while this may in fact be the case, the true meaning of the term 100 year flood is - a flood that has a 1 in 100 or .01% chance of happening in any given year. This is the same for a any other X-Year storm or flood event (10 year - .1% chance in any given year; 500 year - .002% chance in any given year) as you can see we are dealing with low numbers here so don't be too paranoid about your house flooding. Now it is important to note here that if you are in a Federal Insurance Study Floodway there is probably a higher likelihood of flooding but odds are you are not near one of these areas. Also keep in mind this is not NOLA, flooding here in Tennessee is going to be on the order of 1 to 3 feet...still enough to do a lot of damage but not enough to pick your house up and deposit in your neighbors yard or anything. That should do it hope it was somewhat informative/helpful.

Peace
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Old 11-26-2007, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,291 posts, read 15,817,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UTSpinks View Post
I felt like I had to comment on this thread since I know a little about the subject. First off Scotttv the implications of living on a floodplain depend largely on which FEMA designation it has...I mean realistically if you are in what they call Zone X you are in a 500 year floodplain and that is really nothing to worry about, I would also say this about most 100 year (Zone A_) areas. Now to touch a little on Alleycats response. Because of the nomenclature of hydraulics/hydrology many people think that a 100 year storm or flood event is one that happens one time every hundred years or so. This is untrue, while this may in fact be the case, the true meaning of the term 100 year flood is - a flood that has a 1 in 100 or .01% chance of happening in any given year. This is the same for a any other X-Year storm or flood event (10 year - .1% chance in any given year; 500 year - .002% chance in any given year) as you can see we are dealing with low numbers here so don't be too paranoid about your house flooding. Now it is important to note here that if you are in a Federal Insurance Study Floodway there is probably a higher likelihood of flooding but odds are you are not near one of these areas. Also keep in mind this is not NOLA, flooding here in Tennessee is going to be on the order of 1 to 3 feet...still enough to do a lot of damage but not enough to pick your house up and deposit in your neighbors yard or anything. That should do it hope it was somewhat informative/helpful.

Peace
Informative, and some good points. And yes, a 100-year flood does means a 1% chance in any given year, or a 100% chance in 100 years. Twelve of one, half a dozen . . .

I politely disagree about floods in Tennessee however. I was around during the floods of 1975. Trust me, it was way more than one to three feet (and my cousin drown in that flood driving across what was normally a mild-mannered little creek in Cheatham County). And in many locations there have been some pretty high floods since then. Some of this is caused by newer developments, of course. I guess my point is not to take floods in Tennessee lightly, or "assume the best".

Last edited by alleycat; 11-26-2007 at 04:27 PM..
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