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Old 03-15-2014, 12:00 AM
 
5,787 posts, read 6,362,934 times
Reputation: 4348

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Quote:
Originally Posted by N.Cal View Post
Sorry Nasvols but I think Emigrations is pretty spot on.

Two very recent examples.

I was out to dinner with a number of people who have lived in Nashville either all their lives or for a long time. All of them have somewhat professional jobs, administrative healthcare, teachers, etc. We were at a restaurant in the Gulch, one of the new trendy places, and a comment was made, "If things keep going the way they are going, people like us will be priced out of Nashville."

Last night I was at dinner with a coworker and a different restaurant in the Gulch, and we were chatting with the waitress who had moved here seven months ago from Connecticut. I asked sure how she liked it here and she liked it a lot (she moved looking for a new and different scene). She is working at two different restaurants to make ends meet. I asked her how the cost-of-living was, was it as cheap as she thought it would be. She said that was her major disappointment, it was not all that much cheaper here, and she has to live far out in order to afford the rent and she has added transportation costs.

And actually a third example, The security guard who makes eight dollars an hour and is looking for something that will pay more. It's getting to where she can't afford to live here either.
I've never thought of the cost of living being high in Nashville.

The Connecticut comparison need to be looked at deeper. You have to consider what part of the state she was from. All of Connecticut isn't like Stamford and suburban New York City.

It's nice to hear the positive comments about Nashville. Take the focus off Atlanta.
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Old 03-15-2014, 12:23 AM
 
6,446 posts, read 11,122,766 times
Reputation: 6813
Quote:
Originally Posted by N.Cal View Post
Sorry Nasvols but I think Emigrations is pretty spot on.

Two very recent examples.

I was out to dinner with a number of people who have lived in Nashville either all their lives or for a long time. All of them have somewhat professional jobs, administrative healthcare, teachers, etc. We were at a restaurant in the Gulch, one of the new trendy places, and a comment was made, "If things keep going the way they are going, people like us will be priced out of Nashville."

Last night I was at dinner with a coworker and a different restaurant in the Gulch, and we were chatting with the waitress who had moved here seven months ago from Connecticut. I asked sure how she liked it here and she liked it a lot (she moved looking for a new and different scene). She is working at two different restaurants to make ends meet. I asked her how the cost-of-living was, was it as cheap as she thought it would be. She said that was her major disappointment, it was not all that much cheaper here, and she has to live far out in order to afford the rent and she has added transportation costs.

And actually a third example, The security guard who makes eight dollars an hour and is looking for something that will pay more. It's getting to where she can't afford to live here either.
If COL was his only point, that would be one thing. But it's not. It's the constant commentary on how awful everything in Tennessee is, save for Nashville. Do you ever read his posts elsewhere in the Tennessee forums? It's the same whiny BS over and over.

There are certainly a lot of things that Tennessee (and Nashville) need to improve. Some areas much more so than others. Our rural areas are in bad economic shape, for a variety of reasons -- but that is largely true across the country. But the picture Emigrations paints pretty much ignores everything happening in Knoxville, Chattanooga, and Memphis (yes, even Memphis has quite a few things going on). Clarksville and Cookeville are certainly not economic black holes, either. Simply put, you can't generalize the economic status of this state based on, well, any one particular area. There are places that are struggling immensely, as Emigrations puts it. But I don't think that would come close to applying to the areas I mentioned.

I'm just tired of Emigrations pissing on pretty much every piece of positive press there is about Tennessee. I get that he loathes this state, which is fine. I just wish he would deal with it in a healthy way and move out and stay out.
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Old 03-15-2014, 06:28 AM
 
2,271 posts, read 4,584,178 times
Reputation: 1536
I think Emigration is close to spot on too. Metro Nashville is doing well, but go 10 miles off the interstate anywhere in TN and it is a different story.

We were fortunate to make the same salaries when we moved here. The noticeable difference are car insurance, utilities, childcare and income taxes. To live in a desirable neighborhood our house cost almost as much as the one we left although it is bigger. Things that aren't cheaper include hair care, needing to own 2 cars and travel.

The salaries are low here and a lot of the new jobs that are coming are $10/hr jobs at Amazon and not $100k jobs like Nissan brought to town.

One thing though to consider is MA/CT are much smaller states than TN so while there may not be huge swaths of poverty there is still relatively large parts of those states that have been left behind too. Waterbury, CT, Pittsfield, MA, etc.
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Old 03-15-2014, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Houston
901 posts, read 1,592,633 times
Reputation: 1364
er

Last edited by groovamos; 03-15-2014 at 08:38 AM..
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Old 03-15-2014, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
25,699 posts, read 19,086,542 times
Reputation: 30563
Some of the posters here obviously can't hide their personal disdain for me well enough to acknowledge I make reasonable points on these boards, even if goes against the tide of "civic boosters and cheerleaders" that frequent these boards. Without getting too far out into the weeds, probably 75% of the posts I make on the TN forums are related to the Tri-Cities only. If you've been there or know much about it, you'd know the area is in bad shape and that the negativity is justified.

When I was seriously considering relocating to Nashville, rental prices in decent areas were going to be quite a stretch on my expected salary range of $35-$40k. Rental and home prices, particularly in the more desirable areas of Williamson County, East Nashville, and the like, seem to be rocketing past the ability of many middle class people to afford them. I was budgeting about $600 for a 1BR and I'd either have to really go outside the metro or get roommates to stay within budget. I'm just an average person making an average salary and I was feeling "the squeeze" from all the recent growth and price hikes. If I felt this way, I'm sure many other people did as well.

As I mentioned, I found salaries in Nashville to be lower than Midwest metros like KC, Omaha, Des Moines, and Indianapolis, while the cost of living in Nashville overall tended to be higher. This would leave me with fewer disposable dollars in my pocket in Nashville than elsewhere. Someone from another state may look at our $31.50 car registration and jump for joy. My registration was about $230 total in Iowa, but insurance in TN was $100 more every six months. There really was no net change between TN and IA in what I paid to insure/register my car, but these lists tend not to get into even simple things like this, much less minutiae. TN really isn't all that much cheaper in day-to-day life than most other states (excluding extremely high tax states/coastal states). It's real advantage is lack of an income tax, and this benefit is more pronounced for high income earners than low to middle income earners who would pay little net tax in many states that do have an income tax. TN's tax structure is quite regressive, and while this doesn't hurt metro Nashville as severely (as it's wealthier to begin with), low income Nashvillians are going to have a rough go with the state tax structure.

Here in suburban Boston, virtually everything is more expensive than the Nashville metro, with some things, like housing, substantially more expensive. I paid $3.60 to fill up yesterday and Franklin's gas prices all seemed to be $3.30 or lower. Going out to eat is a couple dollars more per dish up here. A 20 oz Coors Light at the bar across the street is $7. A decent 2 BR where I'm at now will run $2k+/month. Property taxes are awful. MA has an income tax and just going a hundred miles up the interstate to the Maine beaches will cost $6 in tolls each way. Compared to this, you'll get a great value for your dollar, even in tonier areas like Franklin, Brentwood, and Belle Meade. But Nashville being cheap compared to expensive edge cases on the coasts doesn't mean it's a great value for the dollar.

Still, wealthy Williamson County and Nashville residents end up subsidizing the TennCare and other assistance poor people in a place like Hawkins County get. Crime and drug addiction levels in most of Tennessee are phenomenal. Metro Nashville is nice, but TN itself has many, many drawbacks and problems that lists like these fail to acknowledge.
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Old 03-15-2014, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Houston
901 posts, read 1,592,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RJS5689 View Post

It's my understanding that Nashville is home to many companies involved in healthcare and music. I'd imagine if either of these industries began to seriously suffer, the Nashville--and Tennessee--economy would suffer, no?
Correct, this would hammer the white collar work force but how can healthcare or music decline much? True, some hospitals have laid off workers (Vanderbilt included) due to the massive national reorganization happening. But Tennessee has never experienced a localized recession like those which clobbered Texas in the '80's, and Washington state in the '60's, not to mention Detroit. These statewide recessions do start in a major city, it was Houston in '83 and by late '85 Austin and San Antonio really began to hurt. Houston looked like a third world city in some respects when I got here in '89 when it began to emerge. (But I have never seen a 1st tier city up close experiencing a boom like this one, wow!)

Tennessee has the most automotive workers of any state in the south, and the most foreign owned auto plants of any state in the country. Obviously manufacturing is going great guns. But the industry is also bringing white collar jobs (Nissan USA is based in Franklin), and it seems engineering is ramping up in that sector based on the following unless I'm wrong: Tennessee, Colorado Governors to Discuss How Advanced Industries Drive Regional, National Innovation | Brookings Institution

VW has yet to announce an expected second facility at Chattanooga; it will go there or Mexico. People of a particular ideological bent all over the country (including some I know) are hoping it will go to Mexico, to punish TN for the recent worker vote to keep the UAW out. I think VW will logically build it in TN. I got into this on FB with an associate (supposedly level-headed) who was all giddy about a supposed "announcement" the day after the vote (yeah right) that it would be built in Mexico. Actually one of the sore loser labor reps on the VW board said something in anger in that vein, and people nationwide clapped their hands in approval. So glad they're on the USA's side.

Here's a recent announcement about an automotive operation which will employ more people than VW; this is 45 miles from Nashville and they are hiring white collar workers now: http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs....=2014303130055

Last edited by groovamos; 03-15-2014 at 09:00 AM..
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Old 04-21-2014, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Houston
901 posts, read 1,592,633 times
Reputation: 1364
OK here is a huffpo article on the fastest growing metros of 1 million or more and Nashville is in there, taken from CNN Money.

Any comment on the right to work status of the states involved by this online journal? Not on your life because 9 of the 10 are in right-to-work states.


Any comment in the piece about 8 of the 10 being in the South? no way.


Any comment in the piece about how 5 of the 10 cities are in the 9 states with no state personal income tax? Hah


Now I noticed the manufacturing sector in the Nashville region gets no mention. I would have thought that the local economy there would have healthcare at #1, manufacturing at #2 or maybe the reverse. Then you have logistics, publishing, music and others. Any ranking numbers for those anybody? BTW Houston's population stats are missing from the Huffpo but are in the CNN original piece. But I can say that the metro is around 6.5 million.


Please next time you are posting something after someone refers to the South as the armpit of the nation, you might post this link and repeat the points I make above:

The 10 Fastest-Growing Cities In The Country, According To CNN Money (PHOTOS)

Last edited by groovamos; 04-21-2014 at 07:16 PM..
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Old 04-21-2014, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
1,583 posts, read 1,579,107 times
Reputation: 2108
If we're claiming Texas and Oklahoma as the south, yes. I've never considered Oklahoma to be in "the south", I'd say it's a Plains state for lack of a better term and I've always sort of viewed Texas as more of a Southwestern state. Or one all its own. But more Southwest than Southeast. If for no other reason, I don't think a state who's entire southern border is with Mexico could really be called the southeast.

Which, by that logic leaves 3 in "the south", but that doesn't mean I'm right or wrong.
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Old 04-22-2014, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Houston
901 posts, read 1,592,633 times
Reputation: 1364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drake744 View Post
If we're claiming Texas and Oklahoma as the south, yes. I've never considered Oklahoma to be in "the south", I'd say it's a Plains state for lack of a better term and I've always sort of viewed Texas as more of a Southwestern state. Or one all its own. But more Southwest than Southeast. If for no other reason, I don't think a state who's entire southern border is with Mexico could really be called the southeast.

Which, by that logic leaves 3 in "the south", but that doesn't mean I'm right or wrong.
I did not use the term 'southeast'. And I'm in Houston which is a very southern city with some western culture mainly because of the ranching around here, which is a highly venerated tradition. And from which region of the U.S do most people moving to Texas come? The south, especially Louisianans in Houston. I know dozens of them.

My sister's boyfriend from Mt Prospect IL, when I asked him how he liked attending North Texas State, (north of Dallas) made a sort of joke like: "they're still fighting the war".

I knew a girl from Wilmette IL who went to U of Oklahoma. She considered the state sort of a border southern state and always used the term 'Okies'. And give me a break please, the speaking style there is very southern, just listen to Leon Russell talk or sing. My cousin, born in GA, is living there, a very southern style guy like a lot of people there, including Oral Roberts. Here is a video of him, his son and another very southern style preacher, three southern preachers, two from Oklahoma and the other from Fort Worth:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uW12uWMpemk

And here is southerner Joel Osteen pastor of Lakewood church located in the former Summit, previous home to the Houston Rockets:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoFO5fov1iE

And from reading on this board all the northerners in a tizzy about all the churches in Nashville all I can say is come down here and get blown away. Lakewood church in Houston, seats 17,000, Second Baptist with three mega-campuses, First Baptist with two mega-campuses, Church of the Woodlands with three mega-campuses.

I'm not on shaky ground here - culture-wise, I'm in a state with very southern roots, land freed from Santa Ana by southerner and Tennessean Sam Houston, and fought for by Davy Crockett to his death.

Speaking of shaky ground here is Texan Delbert McClinton, (lives in Nashville as does Leon Russell):


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDPwvszobjQ
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