U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee > Nashville
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-19-2011, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Smyrna, TN
6,023 posts, read 8,056,182 times
Reputation: 5854

Advertisements


This interesting building, on the corner of 2nd Ave and Broadway, is now put to good use as the gift shop for the Hard Rock Cafe (next door).


A view down Broadway, towards the west. The Lower Broadway district occupies the first 5 blocks of Broadway, and is a bit different in character than 2nd Ave. Even though a number of the buildings are historic, the signage is a bit "louder," and most of the area is geared towards tourists. This is Honky Tonk country...you can hear live music spilling into the streets up and down. The large "radio tower" and saucer shape that rises in the middle-left belongs to Bridgestone Arena. Farther down on the left is the First Baptist Church (as identified by its spire), and the US Customs House. The building rising in the middle of the road in the far distance is actually Palmer Plaza in West End, which is 15 blocks away.


Here's an interesting use for an old bank building: a tattoo parlor. Ha! It now occupies the old American National Bank building. The Encore condo building in SoBro can be seen just down the street.


Merchants Restaurant, along with a couple of tacky Honky Tonks, near 4th and Broad.


A small section of retail is sandwiched among the Honky Tonks.


The other side of 4th and Broad. Seanachie, a former Irish restaurant, has sat empty for a number of years now. Broadway Brewhouse, to the left, is actually a fairly decent place for beer lovers.


A closer view at some of the louder signage on Lower Broad. This section of sidewalk is ALWAYS crowded...I would bet it's easily the most crowded sidewalk in town.


Probably not the smartest place to park a $200,000 car...unless you really love to show off.


'World Famous' Tootsie's Orchid Lounge, near the corner of 5th and Broad, is one of the longer running honky tonks, having lasted more than 50 years. Over those years, some of the most famous names in Country Music have played there.


Bridgestone Arena, buzzing just a few hours before a playoff game (a 4-3 win over the Anaheim Ducks). "Smashville," as the place has been dubbed, welcomes a capacity of 17,113 for NHL games. Besides hockey, the arena hosts a number of concerts and other sporting events (occasional SEC and NCAA tournament games). 2010 was a record setting year for the arena, as it was the 6th most attended concert venue in the U.S. (17th in the world) with over 447,000 ticket sales. The month of December was especially busy, with 7 hockey games and 15 concerts (driven by Garth Brooks' incredible 9 show run), with a total monthly attendance of nearly 335,000. That's a lot of revenue flowing into downtown.


Looking down on Lower Broadway between 5th and 6th, next to the current Nashville Convention Center.


What a setting for a high school! The castle-like Hume Fogg Academic High School is one of the top 50 high schools in the nation, and sits right downtown, on the corner of 8th and Broad. This Tudor Revival building was built in 1912, combining Hume School, and Fogg School, the first and second public schools in Nashville.


Christ Church Cathedral is the Episcopal Cathedral for the Diocese of Tennessee (which is basically Middle Tennessee). The original church dates to 1829, but this beautiful Gothic Revival structure was built in 1894. It has been voted by the Nashville Scene as the "best church music in Nashville."


The old Art Deco main post office from 1934 has been converted to the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, a great use for the building, and bringing a wonderful cultural element to the downtown area.


A side view of the museum, showing off the eagles from its post office days. The much more bland 1950s era Estes Kefauver U.S. Courthouse rises in the background.


Union Station is a Victorian-Romanesque Revival building completed in 1900. The railroad tracks lie below this bridge, next to the station. When passenger rail service was discontinued in 1979, the station was abandoned and fell into disrepair. The adjoining train shed (considered to be an architectual marvel) was unfortunately razed in 2000, after it was no longer salvageable. The station, however, has been beautifully restored, and now functions as a hotel.


The Lifeway Building, part of the Sunday School Board for the Southern Baptist Convention, at 9th and Commerce.


An "evangelical" statue near the Southern Baptist Convention, illustrating Nashville's long running history and close relationship with Christianity. Although Nashville is diversified now, and the home of many religions and religious (and non-religious) types, it is still a stronghold for Protestant churches, namely the aforementioned Southern Baptist Convention.


The Berger Building, the only worthwhile building on its block, sits among a sea of surface parking lots and parking garages.


The Bennie Dillon and Doctor's Buildings, as seen from the south.


And finally, a shot of The Gulch, from near Union Station. The Gulch is a hip, trendy community that has risen out of the loose gravel and grime next to the railroad gulch that marks the western border of downtown. As you can see, the tracks are still active, as a small switching yard still operates here. The tall condo tower in the center is the ICON, the shorter one behind it is the Terrazo. A few other residential buildings occupy the area, namely Velocity. The Gulch claims to be the first LEED certified community in the South. The area was just starting to explode right before the economic slowdown...who knows what kind of lasting effect that will have on the area...but I imagine that when things rebound, The Gulch will as well, as there are a number of projects still on the drawing board in the area.



This concludes nashvol's downtown tour. I hope to get back out on one of these weekends and get some shots of the historic neighborhoods in town.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-19-2011, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Hendersonville, TN
3,290 posts, read 5,348,629 times
Reputation: 2183
Awesome pics, nashvols. You've got a great eye.

A couple of thoughts I had as I was looking at the pictures and reading your comments:

-The Seanachie building was purchased, sold, purchased, and repossessed. Now it's been sold again to the owners of Rippy's and Tootsie's and they're set to announce plans for the property this month. I feel confident that it will be put to good use...far better news than the rumored Walgreens/Rite Aid that was discussed for that location.

-While I agree with your aesthetic opinion on the open surface lots...my concern is that they do serve a purpose. And without them, we could potentially have a parking shortage. Now, hopefully whatever construction goes up in place of those lots will include ample parking to make up for the existing and increased demand. But sadly I've heard of other cities that simply didn't think the parking situation through and now parking is a real issue. Hopefully that doesn't happen here. But I agree, a better use of prime downtown real estate would be offices/condos/whathaveyou.

-I was hoping for a picture of my favorite downtown mural at the Barbershop Quartet building on 7th(?). Also, the Exchange Building across the street from Hume Fogg is one of my favorite buildings downtown. I need to get out and make some pictures myself, perhaps.

-And look, I'm sorry about parking my car out on Broadway...I just had to run inside for a minute to grab a pulled pork sandwich at Jack's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2011, 09:48 AM
 
16 posts, read 36,446 times
Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvols View Post
Rutledge Hill/Nashville Children's Theater


Watch out! A dragon!!! Oh...that's just the iconic symbol of the Nashville Children's Theater, the oldest professional children's theater company in America.


The new building is quite nice...if you have kids and haven't been here, you're really missing out!




The rest of the complex


A view down Middleton St., with an old Vanderbilt laboratory on the left, and an old fire station in the center. The Gulch skyline peeks in from a distance.


A view towards the Cumberland River, with the Korean Veterans Memorial Bridge (aka, Gateway Bridge), and LP field. The steam plant can be seen in the midground, in front of the bridge.


Holy Smokes, where's the Batman Building?? The Pinnacle is completely obscuring it!


The massive steel skeleton of the Music City Center is slowly coming into form. All in all, it should have an enormous impact on the SoBro area.


From here you can really see just how much Rutledge Hill rises over the Cumberland and downtown.


Most of the old houses in this area are now businesses. I noticed a number of architecture firms using the buildings.


More old "houses."


I can't help but like the decoration here...



Downtown "peeks" through


More downtown...from this angle it looks as though there are very few skyscrapers.


Rolling Mill Hill...another project that has suffered with this economy. Hopefully things will pick back up, and soon.




More of Rolling Mill Hill.


Our fire department predates the Civil War.


Current Fire Department Headquarters.
this is my neighborhood, thanks for this

eric b
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2011, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Smyrna, TN
6,023 posts, read 8,056,182 times
Reputation: 5854
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonCorleone View Post
Awesome pics, nashvols. You've got a great eye.

A couple of thoughts I had as I was looking at the pictures and reading your comments:

-The Seanachie building was purchased, sold, purchased, and repossessed. Now it's been sold again to the owners of Rippy's and Tootsie's and they're set to announce plans for the property this month. I feel confident that it will be put to good use...far better news than the rumored Walgreens/Rite Aid that was discussed for that location.

-While I agree with your aesthetic opinion on the open surface lots...my concern is that they do serve a purpose. And without them, we could potentially have a parking shortage. Now, hopefully whatever construction goes up in place of those lots will include ample parking to make up for the existing and increased demand. But sadly I've heard of other cities that simply didn't think the parking situation through and now parking is a real issue. Hopefully that doesn't happen here. But I agree, a better use of prime downtown real estate would be offices/condos/whathaveyou.

-I was hoping for a picture of my favorite downtown mural at the Barbershop Quartet building on 7th(?). Also, the Exchange Building across the street from Hume Fogg is one of my favorite buildings downtown. I need to get out and make some pictures myself, perhaps.

-And look, I'm sorry about parking my car out on Broadway...I just had to run inside for a minute to grab a pulled pork sandwich at Jack's.
That's good news for the Seanachie building.

As for othet pictures....I had to leave out about 150 because I filled up my Flickr. I have some shots of the Customs House, but they weren't as good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2011, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Houston
683 posts, read 1,162,858 times
Reputation: 884
Thank you thank you Nashvols, wonderful to see this from afar. Now my perspective will not let me add much in the way of photos except for one of some momentos that might bring a smile. My father who passed away March 1, brought his family to the city in '55 when he landed a job at L & C so I remember going to his office in the "old" L & C building, and when we got to town the planning for the tower was in full swing. Guilford Dudley Jr. was company CEO and he was insistant on a tower that would be the tallest in the South outside of TX. The board tried to stop it or build a less ambitious number of stories. Dudley and the board compromised, and you can see the result, which is a tower with square floor plan up to about the 9th floor I think, and then the remainder were the L shape floor plan you see. I know this because my father had an ash tray with an 8 inch model of the Dudley proposed tower sitting at the corner, and had the square profile all of the way to the top. The building cost $ 2 million, was the tallest in the Southeast for 1 or 2 years, then the Bank of Georgia built one with the same number of floors, but of course would be taller. My father's family were in Atlanta so it was an interesting little rivalry there for a bit, then Atlanta took off and my father became Group Ins VP. My sister, who was at Peabody in 1971 did one semester in Denmark on the Vanderbilt-in-Denmark program, one of the things that were shared between the institutions before they merged. Mr. Dudley was Ambassador to Denmark by then and always would host the students every semester, for a social. My sister of course discussed my father's tenure at the company with the Ambassador. Then Peabody became Vanderbilt and raised the University's profile by becoming the #1 ranked school of education in the nation, as I have learned in the last few years.

So in this photo you see L & C momentos, ball marker, tie pin with small rubies and a tape measure. I think this is the extent of my collection but not sure.

.

Last edited by groovamos; 04-19-2011 at 01:23 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2011, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Hendersonville, TN
3,290 posts, read 5,348,629 times
Reputation: 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvols View Post
That's good news for the Seanachie building.

As for othet pictures....I had to leave out about 150 because I filled up my Flickr. I have some shots of the Customs House, but they weren't as good.
Customs House...that's it. *kicks self*

In any case, great photos.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2011, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Smyrna, TN
6,023 posts, read 8,056,182 times
Reputation: 5854
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonCorleone View Post
Awesome pics, nashvols. You've got a great eye.

A couple of thoughts I had as I was looking at the pictures and reading your comments:

-The Seanachie building was purchased, sold, purchased, and repossessed. Now it's been sold again to the owners of Rippy's and Tootsie's and they're set to announce plans for the property this month. I feel confident that it will be put to good use...far better news than the rumored Walgreens/Rite Aid that was discussed for that location.

-While I agree with your aesthetic opinion on the open surface lots...my concern is that they do serve a purpose. And without them, we could potentially have a parking shortage. Now, hopefully whatever construction goes up in place of those lots will include ample parking to make up for the existing and increased demand. But sadly I've heard of other cities that simply didn't think the parking situation through and now parking is a real issue. Hopefully that doesn't happen here. But I agree, a better use of prime downtown real estate would be offices/condos/whathaveyou.

-I was hoping for a picture of my favorite downtown mural at the Barbershop Quartet building on 7th(?). Also, the Exchange Building across the street from Hume Fogg is one of my favorite buildings downtown. I need to get out and make some pictures myself, perhaps.

-And look, I'm sorry about parking my car out on Broadway...I just had to run inside for a minute to grab a pulled pork sandwich at Jack's.
Now that I'm off work (and not posting on mobile), I can give you a better response.

I had the pleasure of eating at Seanachie once. It was pretty decent, from what I remember. I was sad to see it close...but a lot of things come and go, especially in that area. I hope whatever replaces it has a bit more success.

I agree with your take on the surface lots. At times, they are very convenient...and being in the open gives you somewhat of a sense of security because you can see all around you. I haven't had any issues with the parking garages, but I have heard stories in the past of people being mugged in them (not sure how prevalent that was, though). I park in the downtown library garage fairly often, and have had no issues (besides the frustratingly slow elevator).

I'm happy that two of the more recent parking lots built have utilized their surface area as parks (especially Public Square, and to a lesser extent, the Hilton on Demonbreun). To me, that is a better solution than simply having a surface lot. I think parking has been slightly less of an issue downtown since workers can use the Titans parking lots (over 8,000 spaces) and take a shuttle downtown. No, not the most convenient thing, but it is a pretty good option. What bothers me about some of the lots is how prime the locations are...a couple of small ones on Lower Broad and at the end of The District...and several on Church Street. It seems there are plans for several of these lots, but they have stalled for various reasons. I think eventually demand will end up filling many of them...but the least some of these places can do is dress up the lots...maybe put some landscaping around them. I know Christ Church has done this to their lot at 9th and Commerce. It's not beautiful, exactly, but it helps.

Also, which building is it with the barbershop quartet mural? I got a couple of murals in my collection...but I'm not familiar with that one. If I missed it, I'd love to check it out some time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by uncle_dubya View Post
this is my neighborhood, thanks for this

eric b
You're very welcome. I think Rutledge Hill has a great bit of potential. It's definitely overshadowed by other (larger) close in neighborhoods, that are "sexier" at this time (like The Gulch, Germantown, parts of East Nashville, etc). I hope Rolling Mill Hill will eventually take off and bring in some residents to the area. Also, as SoBro continues to be the hot spot for "downtown" growth, I think eventually the effect will benefit the Rutledge Hill neighborhood a lot...one day it will feel almost like an extension of downtown.

By the way, what is it like living there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by groovamos View Post
Thank you thank you Nashvols, wonderful to see this from afar. Now my perspective will not let me add much in the way of photos except for one of some momentos that might bring a smile. My father who passed away March 1, brought his family to the city in '55 when he landed a job at L & C so I remember going to his office in the "old" L & C building, and when we got to town the planning for the tower was in full swing. Guilford Dudley Jr. was company CEO and he was insistant on a tower that would be the tallest in the South outside of TX. The board tried to stop it or build a less ambitious number of stories. Dudley and the board compromised, and you can see the result, which is a tower with square floor plan up to about the 9th floor I think, and then the remainder were the L shape floor plan you see. I know this because my father had an ash tray with an 8 inch model of the Dudley proposed tower sitting at the corner, and had the square profile all of the way to the top. The building cost $ 2 million, was the tallest in the Southeast for 1 or 2 years, then the Bank of Georgia built one with the same number of floors, but of course would be taller. My father's family were in Atlanta so it was an interesting little rivalry there for a bit, then Atlanta took off and my father became Group Ins VP. My sister, who was at Peabody in 1971 did one semester in Denmark on the Vanderbilt-in-Denmark program, one of the things that were shared between the institutions before they merged. Mr. Dudley was Ambassador to Denmark by then and always would host the students every semester, for a social. My sister of course discussed my father's tenure at the company with the Ambassador. Then Peabody became Vanderbilt and raised the University's profile by becoming the #1 ranked school of education in the nation, as I have learned in the last few years.

So in this photo you see L & C momentos, ball marker, tie pin with small rubies and a tape measure. I think this is the extent of my collection but not sure.

.
Very cool story and pictures. Thanks for sharing!

Here's a picture of L&C shortly after it was built, literally dwarfing everything else in the area.



Quote:
Originally Posted by DonCorleone View Post
Customs House...that's it. *kicks self*

In any case, great photos.
Yeah, it's a really cool building on the outside. Never been inside, though...always curious about what the interior is like.

And thanks!

The reason why I take a great deal of time adding to the photo threads is because I enjoy sharing them, but I also love seeing other's comments on them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2011, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Hendersonville, TN
3,290 posts, read 5,348,629 times
Reputation: 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvols View Post
I had the pleasure of eating at Seanachie once. It was pretty decent, from what I remember. I was sad to see it close...but a lot of things come and go, especially in that area. I hope whatever replaces it has a bit more success.
Yeah...and with Mulligan's gone from 2nd Avenue now, the city really needs a true Irish pub. (Dan McGuinness never feels right to me...more of a sports bar with an Irish theme and I've never cared for the food there)

Quote:
Also, which building is it with the barbershop quartet mural? I got a couple of murals in my collection...but I'm not familiar with that one. If I missed it, I'd love to check it out some time.
It's really easy to miss. It's 110 7th Avenue North (the Barbershop Quartet Society), just around the corner from Hume Fogg. You can't see the mural from the Broadway side, but on the Church St side is a building sized mural of this Norman Rockwell painting. It's really cool. And you don't even notice the surface lot next to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2011, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Smyrna, TN
6,023 posts, read 8,056,182 times
Reputation: 5854
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonCorleone View Post
Yeah...and with Mulligan's gone from 2nd Avenue now, the city really needs a true Irish pub. (Dan McGuinness never feels right to me...more of a sports bar with an Irish theme and I've never cared for the food there)
There are still a few here and there. McNamara's in Donelson is great. I went there on St. Patrick's Day last year...lively atmosphere, and even live Irish music!

There is also McCreary's in downtown Franklin. Even though it's small, it's definitely got a bit of Irish flavor to it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonCorleone View Post
It's really easy to miss. It's 110 7th Avenue North (the Barbershop Quartet Society), just around the corner from Hume Fogg. You can't see the mural from the Broadway side, but on the Church St side is a building sized mural of this Norman Rockwell painting. It's really cool. And you don't even notice the surface lot next to it.
Interesting...I google street viewed it. Definitely easy to miss, but pretty cool.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2011, 09:14 PM
 
621 posts, read 907,801 times
Reputation: 500
That barbershop building is in what used to be the McQuiddy building... which was THE office supply store for Nashville back when I was a boy in the 70s and early 80s. I also remember when the Renaissance Hotel was built, and opened.... it was considered such a luxurious place. Now it's hardly noticed. Took my son to a model railroad show at the current convention center (the first time I've ever been inside) and was stunned by how small the place is. Nashville really does need a bigger convention center. Maybe next time, we can see some street level shots of the new one.

Thanks so much NashVols... I second Groove's comment... these are great fun to see from afar. BTW Groovamos, I like your stories of a Nashville that predated me by a couple of decades... a time when the place sounds like it was a heckuva mix of innocence and sin.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2013 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $99,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee > Nashville

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2016, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top