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Old 11-04-2018, 09:02 AM
 
2,735 posts, read 1,823,180 times
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Originally Posted by Archer10X View Post
Yes, only his are much more exaggerated. The entire tail is much more bushy and entirely light blonde. Thanks for that.
I would still love to see one!
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Old 11-07-2018, 12:29 PM
 
1,197 posts, read 428,007 times
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Saw two deer standing on the side of the road yesterday, one was laying down (I think it was a baby) and the other was just standing there like a statue. Deer are so pretty but they make me nervous when I see them near the road.
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Old 11-07-2018, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,520 posts, read 10,840,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pretty in black View Post
Saw two deer standing on the side of the road yesterday, one was laying down (I think it was a baby) and the other was just standing there like a statue. Deer are so pretty but they make me nervous when I see them near the road.
In general, if they are laying down or eating, they are content to stay where they are and pose very little danger to your vehicle. That said; it does not take a lot to spook them. Around where I live we have many deer, maybe not quite as many as we had years ago, but still plenty. At one time, just driving the last mile and a half to our house, it was not uncommon to have to stop one to three times just to let the deer cross the road. I went twenty years without hitting one and then the coyotes moved into our area. I hit three deer in one year and there was no way to avoid the collision. The deer simply ran or jumped right into me. Now we don't have as many deer and the coyotes left the area for more prey. I have now gone for some time since I hit the last deer; it must have been a good fifteen years ago. The three I hit with an old Ford F-100 and it did not do too much damage.

One thing that helps avoid deer collisions is to slow down if one crosses in front of you. Also do not look at the one that crossed; look for what might be following it. Deer are social creatures and usually do not travel alone. If you watch the one that crossed; you probably will miss seeing the one behind it.
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Old 11-11-2018, 08:24 AM
 
Location: 2 blocks from bay in L.I, NY
1,626 posts, read 1,310,541 times
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Was driving from one state to another last night and saw deer numerous times along the highway. Most had their heads down eating - although I'm not sure what they eat on the ground. At one mile marker, two large ones were standing stock still to the right of the highway and looked as if they were considering sprinting across to get to the other side of the highway. I said out loud inside my car, with my windows up and the heat on "don't come out to the street! No, don't you do it!" they way I'd talk to a puppy.

I've been doing that for years; issuing verbal warnings when I see them on the side of the hwy or road because I don't want them to get hit. I do this inside my car, with the windows rolled up (never yell out nor blow the horn), and often while going 70-75 mph (hwy). Most of the time, they're not right next to the road but on the grassy sides of the highway away from wooded coverage. Regardless if standing next to the road or not, it has never failed that they always seem to HEAR AND UNDERSTAND me. They look up at me/my car and stare after I say that. Some even suddenly run back further away from the road and back into the trees. Mission accomplished! I've never had one to run into the street nor into the side of my car during these times and this over two decades of often driving in mountainous or heavily wooded rural areas.
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Old 11-12-2018, 08:40 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,224 posts, read 43,434,326 times
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Did you know that an octopus dies after it bears its young? A local aquarium has an octopus which went into hiding for a period of time, and then gave birth to thousands and thousands of teeny babies. The workers scooped out as many of the babies as they could, kept some for the aquarium and released the rest into the Savannah River. I don’t know how long the momma octopus will last...a day, a week?
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Old 11-12-2018, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,520 posts, read 10,840,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Klassyhk View Post
Was driving from one state to another last night and saw deer numerous times along the highway. Most had their heads down eating - although I'm not sure what they eat on the ground. At one mile marker, two large ones were standing stock still to the right of the highway and looked as if they were considering sprinting across to get to the other side of the highway. I said out loud inside my car, with my windows up and the heat on "don't come out to the street! No, don't you do it!" they way I'd talk to a puppy.

I've been doing that for years; issuing verbal warnings when I see them on the side of the hwy or road because I don't want them to get hit. I do this inside my car, with the windows rolled up (never yell out nor blow the horn), and often while going 70-75 mph (hwy). Most of the time, they're not right next to the road but on the grassy sides of the highway away from wooded coverage. Regardless if standing next to the road or not, it has never failed that they always seem to HEAR AND UNDERSTAND me. They look up at me/my car and stare after I say that. Some even suddenly run back further away from the road and back into the trees. Mission accomplished! I've never had one to run into the street nor into the side of my car during these times and this over two decades of often driving in mountainous or heavily wooded rural areas.
They graze; like cows. However; deer will even stand on their hind legs to eat some of the tender leaves off our trees or to pick apples (which cows will not do).

It is when deer are panicked that they present the most danger. Now is the time of the year when most deer/car collisions take place: https://www.iii.org/fact-statistic/f...cle-collisions. Buck will cross the road because it is mating season. Hunters are also in the woods and can spook deer into the highway. Beside the hunters can change the range of predators like coyotes. The number of collisions will reduce after the hunting seasons are over; which might not happen until February of next year. Keep that in mind while you're zipping along at 70-75 mph.

I was a truck driver for many years and traveled about 100,000 miles/year. I had two cases where deer damaged my truck where I could not continue without repairs. On time a carcass cracked off the little brass fitting on my airline which caused all my brakes to come on. Another time a deer broke out the little plastic sight glass on my front wheel and I lost all heavy oil lubrication.

Deer are our most dangerous animals in the US since they kill far more humans than any other animal. Most of the human deaths are because of our reaction while we try to avoid hitting a deer. If you swerve too far; you can roll over or loose control. You can also hit a tree, embankment , or another vehicle. While still dangerous; it's safer to simply hit the deer. Of course you want to slow down as much as you can without loosing control of your vehicle. Big rigs make emergency stops even more difficult; if not impossible.
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Old 11-15-2018, 12:21 AM
 
5,421 posts, read 3,125,849 times
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My annual teensy-weensy kitchen window dwelling spider is back. He lives behind a cup of silk pansies I have in the corner of it. But sometimes when I come down in the morning we accidently greet each other. It's more accident on his part than mine, I'm sure, because he makes a hasty retreat when he sees my attention turn to him. Creepy little window pet.

There's apparently something just perfect about that corner for that type of spider and so far there haven't been any ill effects from my indulging them.

DH has found an outlet for floor sweepings from a peanut packing place and the squirrels are dining on "filet mignon" this fall. They're so roly-poly that I don't see how they can climb. I see two long-time ones are missing - one with half a tail and the other with white ears. They were with us for quite a while.
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Old 11-17-2018, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Germany
2,974 posts, read 510,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
My annual teensy-weensy kitchen window dwelling spider is back. He lives behind a cup of silk pansies I have in the corner of it. But sometimes when I come down in the morning we accidently greet each other. It's more accident on his part than mine, I'm sure, because he makes a hasty retreat when he sees my attention turn to him. Creepy little window pet.

There's apparently something just perfect about that corner for that type of spider and so far there haven't been any ill effects from my indulging them.

DH has found an outlet for floor sweepings from a peanut packing place and the squirrels are dining on "filet mignon" this fall. They're so roly-poly that I don't see how they can climb. I see two long-time ones are missing - one with half a tail and the other with white ears. They were with us for quite a while.

Ours used to live under a flower head. But now they have almost gone, I think it has moved further into the plants as I have not seen the spider for a few days. It has not repaired it's web neither, but that may be because it is too cold.


But it was interesting to see what it caught. Several wasps, several ladybirds (one escaped), 1 mosquito, 1 small spider, and a few other small insects. Fortunately the bees seemed to be able to avoid the web because we had many bees visiting the flowers, but I did not see any in the web.


I do not know what you call it in the US (or if you have them), but this is ours.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Araneus_diadematus
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Old 11-17-2018, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,458 posts, read 4,068,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Diogenes View Post
Ours used to live under a flower head. But now they have almost gone, I think it has moved further into the plants as I have not seen the spider for a few days. It has not repaired it's web neither, but that may be because it is too cold.


But it was interesting to see what it caught. Several wasps, several ladybirds (one escaped), 1 mosquito, 1 small spider, and a few other small insects. Fortunately the bees seemed to be able to avoid the web because we had many bees visiting the flowers, but I did not see any in the web.


I do not know what you call it in the US (or if you have them), but this is ours.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Araneus_diadematus

Orb spiders are fascinating to watch....thanks
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Old 11-23-2018, 04:03 PM
 
947 posts, read 413,628 times
Reputation: 3375
My husband brought all our turkey scraps after Thanksgiving (carcass, skin, ect) across the road into the open field and left them there yesterday. Everything was gone today. There is a family of foxes over there.. They had a special dinner also. ;-)

I usually make turkey soup, but it's so cold here that it's better to share. (better to share even if it's not cold, actually)
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