U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-05-2019, 05:48 AM
 
968 posts, read 425,696 times
Reputation: 3478

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
I just watched the reddest sunset I've seen in ages. Of course, I used to work 2nd shift and seldom saw sunsets but......this one was pretty awesome.
The sunset last evening here in CT was particularly red also. It was lovely. (Red sky in the morning, sailor take warning.. Red sky at night, sailors delight..)

Hunting season is over, so we can again walk in the back woods. And let our dog (who stays right close) off leash.

We've had several heavy rains in the past months, so we saw lots of really big rocks that have been washed down the brook into new locations. There are new surfaces of gneiss rocks exposed, with lots of mica. Looking closely, I can almost see where the pressure squeezed these rocks into existence.

It was so nice to be back in the woods and off the side of the road. It gives me a new lease on life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-07-2019, 09:09 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
13,495 posts, read 11,146,453 times
Reputation: 12537
The state just had a large wild horse roundup in Palamino Valley. This is a pretty much rural suburb of Reno. They gathered a BUNCH of horses. The herd had just gotten to big and were causing issues including road collisions. The wild horse advocacy groups are going nuts. One woman who is a resident out there was crying out because she actually had her domestic horses turned out with the mustang herd and they got caught up in the gather. .


Methinks she really misinterpreted NVs open range law. Wild horses are not technically "wildlife". Actually they are literally not "wildlife." The NV dept of Fish and Wildlife doesn't oversee them. The BLM does. One need not go far to see wild horses around here. They have been made our state animal thanks to efforts by advocacy groups replacing the Desert Bighorn Sheep. We lifer Nevadans really lament that.


The woman I mentioned earlier unfortunately is not an isolated case. The "mustang" herds are now in reality just feral animals thanks to people like her. The wild horses are an invasive, non native, species not naturally occurring wildlife. The wild horse herd bloodlines are pretty willy nilly. The herds actually started in the 19th century with both ranch and cavalry stock being turned loose to fend for themselves. The state has actually tracked these bloodlines and can separate animals by them. This is getting harder to do due to so much domestic stock having been turned out over the years.


The woman I mentioned earlier is an idiot. If she just free ranged her horses she obviously wasn't caring for them and is NOT a horse person. She has no grounds to complain about the roundup based on her presented grounds. She has contributed to the problem by in reality abusing her animals. Real horse people make sure their animals get quality feed, have access to water, get vet care and proper vaccination, worming, ferrier care (a horses feet are a huge priority} and they actually ride them for whatever purpose.


(sigh) What a mess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-07-2019, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Virginia
3,617 posts, read 1,762,606 times
Reputation: 9737
Since I moved from a semi-rural area into the town, I was worried that I wouldn't see many birds. After all, there were osprey and bald eagles over my old house all the time. However, I have been consoled to a certain extent by the frequency of hawk sightings in my new neighborhood. There was one standing in a neighbor's yard when I was taking my daily walk a few days ago, and I often see one perched on a nearby light pole. Also, the city has a secret gem of a garden that is maintained by the Master Gardeners. It's really a unique place that was developed from the old water treatment plant and has many unique tress and shrubs, but it also has a large stocked pond. There are osprey that fish the pond, so I can still see them when they come back in the spring, and I go down to the river and see some bald eagles as well, just not as many as at my old home (that was near one of the biggest nesting sites on the East Coast.) My yard has a ton of blue jays, and my old trees host some really nice woodpeckers. I guess I'll adapt!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-07-2019, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,273 posts, read 3,230,398 times
Reputation: 4756
Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
The state just had a large wild horse roundup in Palamino Valley. This is a pretty much rural suburb of Reno. They gathered a BUNCH of horses. The herd had just gotten to big and were causing issues including road collisions. The wild horse advocacy groups are going nuts. One woman who is a resident out there was crying out because she actually had her domestic horses turned out with the mustang herd and they got caught up in the gather. .


Methinks she really misinterpreted NVs open range law. Wild horses are not technically "wildlife". Actually they are literally not "wildlife." The NV dept of Fish and Wildlife doesn't oversee them. The BLM does. One need not go far to see wild horses around here. They have been made our state animal thanks to efforts by advocacy groups replacing the Desert Bighorn Sheep. We lifer Nevadans really lament that.


The woman I mentioned earlier unfortunately is not an isolated case. The "mustang" herds are now in reality just feral animals thanks to people like her. The wild horses are an invasive, non native, species not naturally occurring wildlife. The wild horse herd bloodlines are pretty willy nilly. The herds actually started in the 19th century with both ranch and cavalry stock being turned loose to fend for themselves. The state has actually tracked these bloodlines and can separate animals by them. This is getting harder to do due to so much domestic stock having been turned out over the years.


The woman I mentioned earlier is an idiot. If she just free ranged her horses she obviously wasn't caring for them and is NOT a horse person. She has no grounds to complain about the roundup based on her presented grounds. She has contributed to the problem by in reality abusing her animals. Real horse people make sure their animals get quality feed, have access to water, get vet care and proper vaccination, worming, ferrier care (a horses feet are a huge priority} and they actually ride them for whatever purpose.


(sigh) What a mess.
I 'm courious.......what does the State do now with this "newly rounded up group of 'so-called' wild horses?

.....Will they now put them ALL up for adoption?
.....
.....What happens to those that are NOT "Adopted"?.........are they continued to be kept "confined" in holding pens by the State, ....or, are they turned back out into the 'wild'??........,,

....OR????
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-07-2019, 10:19 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
13,495 posts, read 11,146,453 times
Reputation: 12537
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post
I 'm courious.......what does the State do now with this "newly rounded up group of 'so-called' wild horses?

.....Will they now put them ALL up for adoption?
.....
.....What happens to those that are NOT "Adopted"?.........are they continued to be kept "confined" in holding pens by the State, ....or, are they turned back out into the 'wild'??........,,

....OR????

Therein lies the big rub. Quality animals are separated and put up for adoption, sale whatever. The dinks which are severely inbred, poorly conformed and generally not viable for actual use as a riding animal are turned back out. They call this "culling." It didn't used to work this way. Animals selected for adoption and such were separated, but not all of them as it is now. The severely substandard animals were sent off to be dog food and healthy animals turned back out.


The advocacy groups have rammed seriously flawed herd management through and done the herds a severe disservice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-07-2019, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Majestic Wyoming
612 posts, read 282,579 times
Reputation: 1681
Yesterday just before sunset I looked out into the distant field and saw what looked to be a huge herd of elk. Grabbed my zoom lense and my camera and I was able to see them more clearly. I was right, around eighty elk laying down in the field. They make the journey down from the mountains every evening, and back up again to the mountains every morning all winter long. It's an impressive sight to behold.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2019, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
20,193 posts, read 4,304,580 times
Reputation: 25451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazy4Chickens View Post
Yesterday just before sunset I looked out into the distant field and saw what looked to be a huge herd of elk. Grabbed my zoom lense and my camera and I was able to see them more clearly. I was right, around eighty elk laying down in the field. They make the journey down from the mountains every evening, and back up again to the mountains every morning all winter long. It's an impressive sight to behold.
Any pics? Sounds wonderful to witness...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2019, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Near Falls Lake
2,449 posts, read 1,753,221 times
Reputation: 2310
Got two bucks sparring by my pond last night on my game cam. Pretty cool!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2019, 08:01 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
13,495 posts, read 11,146,453 times
Reputation: 12537
There is a big swath of undeveloped sage twixt where I am and the hospital. Took a stroll out there the other day and SCADS of cottontails. Talk about the Bunny Ranch. lol. Lots of tracks and scat from Wiley E too. Seems Bugs and company are known to the locals.

Last edited by NVplumber; 01-12-2019 at 08:14 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2019, 12:33 PM
 
5,546 posts, read 3,185,915 times
Reputation: 19055
Our back yard has been unusually quiet this winter. There isn't much variety of birds - mostly woodpeckers and a very few cardinals. There are still a lot of squirrels, bunnies and the occasional unwelcome raccoon.

A neighborhood cat wanders through now and then to get a drink of stolen water.

The yard is colorless and drab save for a few bittersweet berries still holding on to the branches. We've entered the cabin fever season.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:19 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top