U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 09-02-2012, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Valparaiso, IN
34,260 posts, read 6,945,697 times
Reputation: 77536

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by sunset2000 View Post
There you go: Coywolf - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Why are you doubting me!
A coywolf is the result of the coupling of a coyote and a wolf. It's a hybrid. Coyotes and wolves are two different animals, except that they are both canids.

.
__________________
My posts as a Moderator will always be in red.
Be sure to review Terms of Service: TOS And check this out: FAQ
Moderator of Illinois, Chicago, Chicago Suburbs, History, Nature, Writing, Community Chat and Games/Trivia.
___________________________
~ Life's a gift. Don't waste it. ~
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-02-2012, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Rural Western TN
6,168 posts, read 9,401,812 times
Reputation: 7976
Mod cut: Off topic.

once again Coyotes and wolves are COMPELTLY different species, they have a completly different look, a completly different behviaoual pattern, completly differetn methods of hunting, communicating and reproductive cycles, a complet diffeent social structure ect...

just because YOU think the ethiopian wolves LOOK like coyotes doesnt make them the same, once again like your many other posts YOUR opinion that they look the same does not make you right in that they are similar or should be the same animal...

the ethiopian wolf looks that way because of how its adapted to its environment, its reddish coloration to blend with the red dirt, its shorter coat to help it manage the heat...
and putting "Wolf" in quotations does not make the etiopian wolf any more coyote...it is 100% genetically a WOLF...so dont do the disservice of "dummbing" down the species just because it doesnt look like what YOU think of whe you think wolf...
look at the red wolf and the manned wolf...they too dont look like greys and yet they are wolves...NOT coyotes...

in MY opinion it DOESNT look like a coyote...
as for the differences there too vast to even begin to go to in depth...


its like asking what the difference between a husky and a wolf is...just because they LOOK alike...

a quick internet search on "the differences between wolves and coyotes" will bring up hundereds of pages...

Last edited by PJSinger; 09-03-2012 at 12:07 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
6,873 posts, read 3,588,523 times
Reputation: 9560
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo6 View Post
Not sure but owners of small dogs should be aware that coyotes will consider a small dog a tasty snack (and coyotes are nearly everywhere).
They do not have to be small, either. Coyotes will lure a large dog out away from its protection and then pack up on it. Even a fierce dog (alone) hasn't a chance against a ring of coyotes.

As for their differences, those that I've seen are basically size. This image gives a pretty good comparison:


According to this article from my home state, there are also behavioral differences:
WOLVES VS COYOTES!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 06:09 PM
 
25,527 posts, read 11,622,295 times
Reputation: 29336
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxywench View Post
oh lord, sunset has escaped to another section of city-data...

once again Coyotes and wolves are COMPELTLY different species, they have a completly different look, a completly different behviaoual pattern, completly differetn methods of hunting, communicating and reproductive cycles, a complet diffeent social structure ect...

just because YOU think the ethiopian wolves LOOK like coyotes doesnt make them the same, once again like your many other posts YOUR opinion that they look the same does not make you right in that they are similar or should be the same animal...

the ethiopian wolf looks that way because of how its adapted to its environment, its reddish coloration to blend with the red dirt, its shorter coat to help it manage the heat...
and putting "Wolf" in quotations does not make the etiopian wolf any more coyote...it is 100% genetically a WOLF...so dont do the disservice of "dummbing" down the species just because it doesnt look like what YOU think of whe you think wolf...
look at the red wolf and the manned wolf...they too dont look like greys and yet they are wolves...NOT coyotes...

in MY opinion it DOESNT look like a coyote...
as for the differences there too vast to even begin to go to in depth...


its like asking what the difference between a husky and a wolf is...just because they LOOK alike...

a quick internet search on "the differences between wolves and coyotes" will bring up hundereds of pages...
Good post. I would think the dog would interbreed more often with coyotes than coyotes with wolves.

An undergrad course in Mammalogy also helps. Or simply go to your nearest university, go into the stacks and read a few papers, scientific papers, etc. like PhD studies on Canis latrans and Canis lupus. Studies which include basic identification, behavior, and even skull identification and believe me, they DO get into detail. We had to identify mammals by their skulls. Lots of fun, actually. We had a grad student doing a study on Canis latran's scat.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2012, 07:01 AM
 
4,784 posts, read 8,059,576 times
Reputation: 3122
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunset2000 View Post
Do you guys know that most (or all) coyotes are mixed with wolves.

There you go: Coywolf - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Why are you doubting me!
Did you not realize that Wikipedia is not a factual source? Anyone can add info on a subject there. If you look at your link it says at the top that an expert is needed on that particular subject. There are actually different theories about wolves and coyotes. I think you are thinking more along the lines of wolf and coyote hybrids though, which occurred much later and to a lesser degree, than the actual beginnings of the wolf and coyote did. In other words there is more to the story than simply coyotes and wolves are all mixed. There are definitely species of wolves, and definitely species of coyotes. When they interbreed now they are called hybrids.

One theory states wolves actually descended from coyotes.

DNA analysis has determined that wolves, Canis lupus, descended from coyotes, which have a more primitive anatomy. Fossil records also show that coyotes predate wolves by several thousand years. The oldest coyote remains have been found in New Mexico, while wolves appear to have went north over time. The closest relative of the coyote is the red wolf, Canis rufus, which is severely endangered. This species fell victim to predator control programs and was unable to cope as well as the coyote. The small number that exist in the wild currently are the result of intensive programs of reestablishment.


The more current hybrids:

Hybrid offspring of coyotes and wolves have spread south along the eastern seaboard, a new DNA study confirms.

Scientists already knew that some coyotes, which have been gradually expanding their range eastward, mated with wolves in the Great Lakes (map) region. The pairings created viable hybrid offspring—identified by their DNA and skulls—that have been found in mid-Atlantic states such as New York and Pennsylvania.

Now, new DNA analysis of coyote poop shows for the first time that some coyotes in the state of Virginia are also part wolf. Scientists think these animals are coyote-wolf hybrids that traveled south from New England along the Appalachian Mountains.

The study also identified another coyote migration route moving through the southern states.



Coyote
Coyote-Wolf Hybrids Have Spread Across U.S. East


And as pointed out already, there are different types of wolves and coyotes, resulting in different sizes and colors, similar like what you'd find in different dog breeds.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tamiznluv View Post
If it was a pure coyote, it's fur would be nasty. Haven't seen a cyote with that long of legs either.
Most of the coyotes around me have beautiful coats. Perhaps the ones you are seeing live in an area with a low food supply and the coyotes have health issues as a result.

Last edited by andthentherewere3; 09-03-2012 at 07:34 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2012, 07:18 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,325 posts, read 30,364,919 times
Reputation: 12690
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo6 View Post
Not sure but owners of small dogs should be aware that coyotes will consider a small dog a tasty snack (and coyotes are nearly everywhere).
As for the difference- in North America anyway the wolves (Gray wolf/Timber wolf) you find will be substantially larger. 40 lbs is a big coyote, about 1/2 the size of a smaller Timber Wolf. The wolf lives in wilderness areas, the coyote can live quite close to the city. I think we have sometheing called a Red Wolf in the south that are more coyote sized, but still bigger at about 60 lbs. They are very rare and exhibit other differences like color and hunting habits.
Coyotes are extremely adaptable and are as likely to be out during the day as night whereas wolves are mostly nocturnal.
Precisely.
The Red Wolf once roamed the southeastern United States. For canids living in this warmer region, making a living is obviously different from surviving in Minnesota or northern Montana. It is slowly being brought back. For a couple years I lived near the St Vincent's Wildlife Refuge, an island off northwest Florida where they keep a breeding pair in a free but somewhat controlled environment.

Link, pdf file of the island's species

There was a flurry of excitement when one of the pups, at one year of age, swam to mainland Florida to seek new territory. He was humanely trapped and relocated. There is more than one captive red wolf breeding program, but as far as I know, the Alligator River Wildlife Refuge in northeastern North Carolina is the only place where they truly run free in the wild.

During early morning walks, I regularly saw coyotes in central Denver, just minutes from downtown. They would sometimes be in pairs, sometimes it was just one. One used to keep pace with me and my mastiff, I once saw her (I always thought of her as a female) with a piece of pizza in her mouth.
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJSinger View Post
A coywolf is the result of the coupling of a coyote and a wolf. It's a hybrid. Coyotes and wolves are two different animals, except that they are both canids.

.
Exactly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunset2000 View Post
Do you guys know that most (or all) coyotes are mixed with wolves.
I don't think so.
There is definitely evidence that red wolves have hybridized with coyotes, which is one of the reasons they are close to extinction. Red wolves living in the same territory as coyotes share much of the same prey.
Some (especially some ranchers) might say that red wolves are coywolf hybrids, and therefore should not be considered endangered species.
David Mech is a respected biologist who has been studying wolves for many years. If he declares the Red Wolf to be a wolf, canis rufus, I believe him.
Link
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2012, 07:19 AM
 
506 posts, read 436,149 times
Reputation: 281
Quote:
Fossil records also show that coyotes predate wolves by several thousand years. The oldest coyote remains have been found in New Mexico


Are you saying that wolves and coyotes originated from New Mexico and spread all across the globe?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2012, 07:54 AM
 
4,784 posts, read 8,059,576 times
Reputation: 3122
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunset2000 View Post
[/i]

Are you saying that wolves and coyotes originated from New Mexico and spread all across the globe?
Not necessarily, but something similar to coyotes/wolves/dogs emerged in that region, from what I have read over the years. As I said above, there are differing theories, which just make for a thoughtful discussion of possibilities. I like this link which breaks down the possible timelines and species, as well as regions. Look at "Early Oligocene", which reads "In North America, Hesperocyon appears. It is the first canid genus and the basis of the hesperocyonine radiation, the first of three radiations of canids. These canids are small kit fox-sized animals with supple, muscular bodies, long tails, padded feet, and relatively short muzzles. " Also look at "Late Miocene", which reads, "It is from the canine radiation that all living dogs are derived. That radiation began in the southwest United States, the birthplace of modern dogs". And it goes on to list the various canid species that evolved, timelines etc. Based on newer DNA evidence they end with, "However, other DNA research gives a different story: DNA from eastern Canadian wolves, gray wolves (Canis lupus) from other areas of North America, coyotes (Canis latrans), and red wolves (Canis rufus) were compared. The results indicate that (1) the eastern Canadian wolf is not a gray wolf, (2) the eastern Canadian wolf and the red wolf are very closely related, and (3) the eastern North American wolves are more closely related to the coyote than to the gray wolf. Based on these findings, the authors suggest the following evolutionary model: There was a branching 1 - 2 million years ago from a common ancestor of gray wolves, the eastern North American wolves, and coyote. One of the branches migrated to Eurasia and there gave rise to the gray wolf. The other branch remained in North America and 150,000 - 300,000 years ago branched into the ancestor of the eastern North American wolves and the coyote. (12)
Chronology of Wolf Evolution

Last edited by andthentherewere3; 09-03-2012 at 08:09 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2012, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,718 posts, read 2,920,858 times
Reputation: 3956
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunset2000 View Post
Do you guys know that most (or all) coyotes are mixed with wolves.
Partly true, and only in the East. Coyotes have occasionally mated with the the Eastern wolf, Canis Lupus Lycaon, and possibly with the Red Wolf, Canus Lupus Rufus. This has produced a hybrid larger than a pure coyote, with males often between 35-40 pounds rather than the typical 25-30 of a pure coyote. In the West it is a different story, with hybridization very rare. There, the larger Western Gray Wolf, with only minor differences between subspecies, are deadly foes of coyotes, and kill them at every opportunity. After the wolf reintroduction into Yellowstone NP the coyote population was cut in half, and where there are wolves coyotes must remain very wary and fearful.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2012, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Medina Co., TX
2,886 posts, read 2,292,353 times
Reputation: 2400
Coyotes also have domestic cats on their top 10 menu preferences. Possible sightings of the legendary chupacabra are continually brought up by the media here in Texas, but anythat were killed and turned over to the experts turned out to be coyotes with severe mange. The pics shown are usually pretty ugly.
Recent Chupacabra Sightings | Fox News
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $89,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top