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Old 10-13-2015, 07:26 AM
 
853 posts, read 1,223,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
Yes, NJmmadude, I am also still hearing gray treefrogs. I haven't heard any peepers lately. Boy, I love the sound of peepers.

I have a very small, very dark (black-appearing), very FAST frog that has been living in a water-filled depression at the end of my driveway. He "moved in", along with 2 other frogs, right after the June 23rd macroburst storm. The other 2 are gone, but he is still here. I can rarely get more of a glimpse of him than his butt disappearing under some mud and leaves in the "pond"; he is very shy. Yes, I kept refilling the hole/depression all summer. We really like having frogs around...

The frog doesn't look like any NJ frog I've been able to find on the internet. He or she hasn't been calling, but one of the other frogs that looked like him used to literally say "Eeek!" when it saw a human, before it dived under the mud. Any ideas where I can look for photos to see if I can identify the little guy? And of course, now I am worried about him as winter approaches.
Hi LoriNJ, I believe that you have a Northern green frog in your puddle. The Northern green frog can vary widely in coloration (bright green to dark bronze), is very resilient, and is quite the habitat generalist. They will sometimes breed in small, temporary puddles such as yours, and their tadpoles may overwinter before complete metamorphosis.

Northern green frogs are not freeze tolerant, they will hibernate under the mud. They will move around from place to place during rainy spells, and will only stay in an area for as long as it holds water. Therefore, you may want to continue to maintain the amount of water in the puddle for the frogs until it freezes over. They will move into the mud and hibernate for the winter. Next year let the puddle dry up naturally, and they will move out safely. Letting it dry out now may throw them off a bit, as it is close to the first frost.

Regarding the 'eek', Northern green frogs do that as an alarm call to warn others of approaching predators, and it is what gives them their taxonomic name Lithobates clamitans (clamitans = to exclaim). Their advertisement call for breeding sounds like the single pluck of a banjo string.

I love peeper choruses too. One cool thing, if you are interested: next year listen carefully to the chorus. Among the peeping (advertisement calls of the lone males) you will hear soft chirping sounds at times (similar to the advertisement call, but softer), which indicates the approach of a female. This is called a courting call. Also, males are territorial, and some non-calling males (called satellite males) will approach another calling male's territory. The calling male will let out a trilling "rrrreeeeep" (roll the 'r'), and you can hear this territorial call very clearly at times. It is so obvious that it sometimes it throws off uninitiated naturalists into believing that it's the advertisement call of a chorus frog, which is related to the spring peeper and its advertisement call is a similar upward trill.
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Old 10-13-2015, 08:13 AM
 
6,676 posts, read 8,027,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJmmadude View Post
I love peeper choruses too. One cool thing, if you are interested: next year listen carefully to the chorus. Among the peeping (advertisement calls of the lone males) you will hear soft chirping sounds at times (similar to the advertisement call, but softer), which indicates the approach of a female. This is called a courting call. Also, males are territorial, and some non-calling males (called satellite males) will approach another calling male's territory. The calling male will let out a trilling "rrrreeeeep" (roll the 'r'), and you can hear this territorial call very clearly at times. It is so obvious that it sometimes it throws off uninitiated naturalists into believing that it's the advertisement call of a chorus frog, which is related to the spring peeper and its advertisement call is a similar upward trill.
Yes, that's an interesting call. To me, it sounds like a cross between a Spring Peeper and a Chorus Frog.
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Old 10-14-2015, 09:53 PM
 
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Wow, thank you so much for all that information, NJmmadude. I really appreciate it. I looked at some photos of Northern Green frogs and they do seem to match the frog in my driveway, down to the lighter green head. Had to laugh when one site described them as diving into the water at the first approach of a perceived threat. Yep, that's why I usually only see frog backside disappearing under the mud. I hope the little guy/gal can find some mud deep enough to burrow under for the winter.

There is a pond down the street from us. We love driving by on a spring night, stopping the car and opening the windows. The sound is deafening! There are definitely multiple kinds of frogs in that pond, all calling, "Pick ME! Pick ME!". But nothing says "spring" like the peepers, who will apparently inhabit even the smallest pocket of water. I wish I could hear them year round.
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Old 10-15-2015, 04:14 AM
 
6,676 posts, read 8,027,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
I wish I could hear them year round.
You can!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBn9dvcoXk8
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