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Old 08-21-2017, 09:15 PM
 
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There used to be a coyote that would cross through my backyard every day at 6 pm. There were times I'd be in a lounge chair and he'd run by maybe 20 feet away, look at me and keep going. They usually don't bother people.
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Old 08-21-2017, 09:28 PM
 
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i have seen the most coyotes in the suburbs. they are to me urban. i only ever see single coyotes. its weird because i think oh theres an odd looking dog, and then i get closer and its oh theres a coyote. this is broad daylight me driving in the suburbs in the car, and literally the coyote is walking along the side of the road just like a dog. its weird

there is a small college town in northern california with lots of houses and dormitories in the trees, and there are "garbage bears." They are wild bears, which to me is very scary because when i camped and backpacked bears are to me the most dangerous critter i'd ever run into and I always gave them a wide berth.

So i'm looking at apartments to rent and everyone said "oh careful walking in from your car at night watch for the garbage bears" which have absolutely no fear of people and go around the neighborhoods going through trash cans. Even people who locked the garbage up in the garage, still had to put it out on the day of pickup, and the bears know the schedule and day of the week and would show up and paw through the trash. that freaked me out. because with so many people around its too easy to get careless. a bear is a bear and these were big and hungry and i did not want to live near them.
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Old 08-21-2017, 09:37 PM
 
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Our poor wildlife should not be coming into urban areas and is a signal that there's something wrong in the environment. Tsk.


I did have a coyote encounter many decades ago when I was in seventh grade. I lived in a small prairie town and in the early evening left the house to walk the three short blocks to school for a basketball game. Under the streetlamp at the end of my block stood a large "dog" I didn't recognize. And as a kid I knew every dog in town. "Wolf!" I thought.


I turned around and circled the other block to make my way to school. I remember my folks laughing at me when I told them there was a wolf outside after I got home. Now I think it's kind of strange that they didn't tell me it might have been a coyote. But in those days it wasn't uncommon for farmers to shoot any unwelcome wildlife in the area and perhaps by then it was a rare sighting.


Now I see coyotes occasionally in So. MN but I know people are still killing them.


We live on a bluff above a nature preserve and sometimes have herons, deer, opossum, raccoons and other wildlife in our yard. The city considers them a nuisance and culls the deer herd from time to time. Well, and they are a nuisance! All of them. But I think we haven't come to a good solution for coexistence with the proximity. I don't know what that is.
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Old 08-21-2017, 10:59 PM
 
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Northwest suburban NJ here. Coming across a black bear is pretty common here
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Old 08-21-2017, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
Our poor wildlife should not be coming into urban areas and is a signal that there's something wrong in the environment. Tsk.
Why shouldn't they come into town. They were there first. Besides, the food is better—and there are interesting things to see and do. Ask any deer about the former and any coyote about the latter.

I once came around a bend and saw a cow moose with two calves. Her glare and her stance made me decide to take my dogs and myself on a wide detour around them. Male moose are no problem at all outside of rutting season. I had a dog who touched noses with one we saw regularly.
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Old 08-21-2017, 11:17 PM
 
Location: I am right here.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
Our poor wildlife should not be coming into urban areas and is a signal that there's something wrong in the environment. Tsk.
There is a lot of food for coyotes in urban and suburban areas though. Rabbits, cats, waterfowl, bird feeders, garbage cans full of food. I've found rabbits, ducks, and goose remains in my yard and my neighbors' yards. Coyote food. This is all confirmed by game camera pics, security footage, etc.

Every week on my neighborhood Nextdoor site, people post about their missing cats...followed by posting about yet another coyote sighting.

My dad also sees coyotes out in his rural MN area. He and his neighbors shoot them if given the opportunity.
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Old 08-21-2017, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
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OMG! He was one lucky guy - 6 coyotes - thank goodness they can't climb trees. That is the one thing that worries me about my daughter living up in the mountains - if she and her fiance run into a mountain lion or bobcat (are they different?) than they are pretty much screwed. He is park ranger and is not allowed to carry a weapon.
He would be a Classification#1 Ranger......Those Rangers that qualify for a Classification#2, are required to carry a firearm.
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Old 08-21-2017, 11:41 PM
Status: "Trapped but not by Minnesota" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Somwhere
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When I lived in the SF Bay Area, we saw a few wild animals, but no predators.
Couple times, there was a deer in the back yard; same one each time, he had weird antlers.
skunks, raccoons, opossums, even an owl.

My favorite, one day the privet tree out back was covered with migrating monarch butterflies.
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Old 08-22-2017, 02:16 AM
 
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I encountered a coyote once a few years back. It was fairly late at night and I was in my boyfriend's apartment complex getting into my car. He lived in a suburban, populated area which made it seem odd. At first I thought it was a dog. It literally scared the hell out of me. I had mace on my keychain and remember clutching it in fear. I stood still a few feet from the car and it looked at me and left. I'm pretty sure as with most animals, if you don't mess with them they typically won't mess with you. But I still remember that.
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Old 08-22-2017, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Idaho
2,476 posts, read 2,013,442 times
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Woman attacked by rabid coyote grateful for survival instinct - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

I have lived in SE UT and now in ID. In UT there coyotes were everywhere, in fact they had a bounty of $50.00 per a set of ears. Never heard of them bothering a human and they for sure never bothered me.
I also camp in Shoshone NF (WY) and Custer NF (MT) but from my experience Coyotes will look and trot off. But like the article I posted, if they are rabid, the circumstances can change.
But if a Coyote started to advance on me, I would shoot it, call animal control and let them decide why.
.
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