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Old 08-22-2017, 04:28 PM
 
5,761 posts, read 3,045,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Praline View Post
OMG! He was one lucky guy - 6 coyotes - thank goodness they can't climb trees. That is the one thing that worries me about my daughter living up in the mountains - if she and her fiance run into a mountain lion or bobcat (are they different?) than they are pretty much screwed. He is park ranger and is not allowed to carry a weapon.
In case no one has answered, yes mountain lion and bobcat are two distinct species. Bobcat is much smaller and really poses no threat unless sick, as mentioned, or you decide to make it a pet.




Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
About nine years ago my wife and I encountered a mountain lion here in Northeastern PA. I know they don't exist in PA; which is what my Game Commission told me when I reported the sighting.

We were in our pickup truck going down a dirt road and I spotted what I originally thought was a coyote 200 yards in front of us on the road. I asked my wife to hold on while I got a closer look and we ended up chasing the animal down the dirt road at 35 mph. We were within 20 yards of it when it sprang off the road and disappeared into what we call red brush (I am sure there is a more scientific name). As we closed in on the animal I would have guessed it's weight at about 100 pounds. But we also saw a cat's gate and long curved tail. I waited for my wife to tell me what she thought because I did not want to plant it in her mind that we just saw a mountain lion. She confirmed my opinion.

Our Game Commission has a very valid point that they never retrieved one carcass off any of PA's roads. However; about three years ago a woman in Connecticut hit and killed one mountain lion that had DNA traced back to SD. So we feel if it can get to Connecticut; it could have crossed through PA.

But, the speed of the animal was the scariest part of our encounter; no way could somebody out run an animal that fast. Even if you were armed it could hit you before you realized what was happening. So, yes; I would worry. Maybe not so much about the bobcat; they are smaller and I don't remember hearing any accounts of attacks.

Our game commission here in TN has finally admitted there are mountain lion in the state. In spite of big cities like Nashville, it can get pretty remote quickly here. Probably the most interesting wildlife to me is I am certain I saw a Fisher on the way to work a couple years ago. We're beyond the official range of it's habitat but it's the only animal I could find that fits what I saw. Really beautiful creature.
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
3,434 posts, read 2,821,502 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forever Blue View Post
But I'm talking about when you're in the city, amongst civilization/residential homes, etc. My SO & I live in the city & go walking pretty regularly. One of the places we go to is the college grounds of one of my alma maters. It's a tad going up towards the mtns. There's still homes above/around, but I'm sure there's the rare times when certain wildlife can wander down. For ex, during the summertime, they'll post signs that say watch out for snakes.

Yesterday, my SO and I were there. Off in the distance, for the 1st time there, I spot a coyote walking around & I've walked there about 10-15 Sun mornings before. It was pretty far away & walked behind a building out of sight, but I still walked at a good pace back to the car & my SO, of course, went along w/ me. He says they're only maybe aggressive & actually try to bite if they're hungry and/or in a pack.

It was a funny feeling being out in the open & vulnerable with a wild animal in my vicinity. That's never happened to me before...only when I'm at the zoo in which they're in cages!

I'm a little wary of walking on that campus now. But I like walking there & I'm quite shocked no one else walks there on Sundays because it's nice landscaping w/ inclines & it feels like you're kind of out in nature (even though there are bldgs all around), but my SO & I are the only ones really.

That's the first time we've seen a coyote there, so I guess from now on, we'll have a stick &/or mace.

"A stick," right. Get it over with, go high-tech and spend a hundred bucks on a nice folding baton. High quality with safety tip so you wound but don't kill.

I wouldn't walk or, back in the day, jog without a lil' pepper spray on the wrist, good for maybe one squirt and three feet. My enemies were dogs and on very rare occasion people. Never used it. Did use the folding baton I often also carry, on fracking dogs. Busted one right in the head that bit me, hope it dropped dead: I was running and kept going. If lived more rural, I'd carry my 9mm in such situations too though that's overkill almost all the time.

Sure, ran into coyotes in Mill Creek WA some years back, which was a bit weird. North Creek Watershed, though, which is a de facto small animal sanctuary, as are other parks in Mill Creek. They ate cats and whatever else, explaining lack of strays that year and after. No problem, they're shy unless diseased. I've never run into more than two. They'd need to be very hungry to go after a man, and if you were that far off the beaten path you'd be in Alaska with Liam Neeson at your side w/rifle and A Set of Very Unique Skills to help, because that's how unusual the situation would be.

I don't go back country without a 45 revolver w/scandium frame, or my 9mm, both lightweight. Nor does anyone else with any brains. Not what you're asking, though.

If you want to live in fear of animals, try doing something about it via Sam Colt, a baton, pepper spray, brass knuckles, or whatever else is legal in your state. People are the problem 99% of the time in my extensive experience wandering cities one end of the country to the other, most recently Phoenix this past weekend. Deadliest thing out there are gangSTAS, not scorpions or similar smart enough to lay low in the day.
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Old 08-22-2017, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,175 posts, read 10,585,610 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Our game commission here in TN has finally admitted there are mountain lion in the state. In spite of big cities like Nashville, it can get pretty remote quickly here. Probably the most interesting wildlife to me is I am certain I saw a Fisher on the way to work a couple years ago. We're beyond the official range of it's habitat but it's the only animal I could find that fits what I saw. Really beautiful creature.
Until they have a carcass they (my Game Commission) will never admit to mountain lions in our State.

However, in this article (Fisher Resurgence: Once extinct in Pennsylvania forests, a big active predator is on the rebound | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) they state that West Virginia also reintroduced fishers. So it is very possible that they are also in Tennessee. Even though PA released them and they are supposedly doing good; I have never seen one. Correction; I do not think that I have seen one - I did see something at such a distance that I could not really identify it (a maybe).
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Old 08-22-2017, 05:24 PM
 
5,841 posts, read 3,309,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Praline View Post
I'm actually more fearful around raccoons than coyotes. One evening when I was returning on foot from the post office, I saw a few people crossing the street in the middle of the block. A couple of people froze and backtracked the way they had come. I lived just around the corner and had no intention of going out of my way by crossing the street.

I looked to see what everyone was avoiding and it looked like a hideous child who appeared to be having a tantrum and throwing a garbage can lid into the alley. When I got closer, it turned out be a large raccoon who was going through the garbage. When I got closer, he stood up on his hind legs and stared at me like he was going to say something. He hissed at me and I wasted no time in darting out into the street (traffic be damned), walked all the way to the corner and then came back to my house. I was so spooked that it took awhile for me to walk past that alleyway long after the raccoon had gone.
Yeah, racoons will bite humans if you get too close. Plus they can really be destructive, getting into trash and even into your attic.
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Old 08-22-2017, 05:26 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
28,367 posts, read 2,208,837 times
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We were walking in a large park, in a populated area & came across a beautiful bobcat. He ran off when he saw us, but he was so beautiful. It was near all the picnic tables, where lots of voles & gophers hang out, so I presume he was looking for his own picnic. Birds also go looking for food scraps from the tables
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Old 08-22-2017, 07:06 PM
 
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The most dangerous non-human animal I've seen here in Richmond was a half-wolf, being walked on a leash by its proud owner. Turns out he breeds them and keeps them in his yard, in wire cages I'm glad to say. Still, dogs shouldn't be kept in urban confinement, much less an animal as big as a wolf and with some of the same instincts.
The raccoon I regularly see in my backyard came in the basement walkout one day, up the cellar steps to the kitchen table, sniffed at my ankles, and then went to the back door, which I opened for it. There's also a woodchuck that likes a weed that grows behind my gazebo. It has never told me how much wood it would chuck, though. I once saw a whitetail deer running around the Wayne County Museum yard. This is all in the geographical center of a city of 45,000.
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Old 08-22-2017, 11:01 PM
 
Location: San Bernardino County (previously L.A.)
4,485 posts, read 7,539,809 times
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Thanks for sharing your experiences everyone!

I like walking there & don't want to stop going there. I just wish a few more people walked there too, so it's not too isolating a feeling. There are a few tennis courts in which there's usually always some people playing tennis, but other than that, no one else really around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
Trust me it HAS happened to you many times before but this is the first time you spotted one.

As long as you are with someone you should be safe from animals, even alone you should be too.

Maybe you could get a walking stick? That would give you something "just in case" and in reality just give you peace of mind.
True, that's the 1st time I'VE SEEN one. One could have been behind me somewhere that I didn't see, although I do look behind me from time to time too. Yes, a walking stick is what I meant in my OP.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeachSalsa View Post
...
Every week on my neighborhood Nextdoor site, people post about their missing cats...followed by posting about yet another coyote sighting...
Glad you brought that up! I went to the NextDoor site & there have been some coyote sightings in my area here & there. One was in one of the many parks in my area & that's surrounded by lots of homes all around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
There is a great book on coyotes. It's based on actual field work. Take a look at the reviews and read the except.

https://www.amazon.com/Gods-Dog-Cele...ds=god%27s+dog
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
Inside of a city and around your home and neighborhood you should haze the coyotes so the continue to be scared of humans.

Check out this humane society guide.


As for mountain lions, if you live in their habitat you may or may not see them, but I can guarantee that they've seen you. It is highly unlikely a mountain lion will attack an adult unless it is protecting its young. Same can be said about bears.
Thanks guys for posting! Very informative.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
...Forever Blue in your original post you asked WWYD about future walking where there are coyotes. There's really only one answer to that (aside from women taking extra precautions or simply not hiking in wilderness when they have their periods because the smell of menstrual blood does attract carnivores and stinging insects) - don't walk alone if possible, and always carry some pepper spray and have it ready to use at all times, and carry a good sturdy walking stick. You will maybe sight other coyotes but they're more afraid of you than you are of them and I think you will never, ever have to use your pepper spray or walking stick against any of them. Solitary coyotes are shy and cautious of people and unlikely to approach, but coyotes in packs are more confident and may be aggressive. Fortunately coyote packs in cities are not as common as solitary coyotes.

Somebody else mentioned that you have more to worry about from other humans than you do from coyotes and I totally agree with that. If you ever have to use your pepper spray the chances are it will have to be against another human, not some wildlife just trying to avoid humans and get on with their own business of surviving.
Thanks, yes. I only go there on Sun mornings IF I feel like it & it's not too hot. And I NEVER go there alone anyway. I'll be more watchful from now on, if I even go there again to walk.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondebaerde View Post
"A stick," right. Get it over with, go high-tech and spend a hundred bucks on a nice folding baton. High quality with safety tip so you wound but don't kill.

I wouldn't walk or, back in the day, jog without a lil' pepper spray on the wrist, good for maybe one squirt and three feet. My enemies were dogs and on very rare occasion people. Never used it. Did use the folding baton I often also carry, on fracking dogs. Busted one right in the head that bit me, hope it dropped dead: I was running and kept going. If lived more rural, I'd carry my 9mm in such situations too though that's overkill almost all the time.

Sure, ran into coyotes in Mill Creek WA some years back, which was a bit weird. North Creek Watershed, though, which is a de facto small animal sanctuary, as are other parks in Mill Creek. They ate cats and whatever else, explaining lack of strays that year and after. No problem, they're shy unless diseased. I've never run into more than two. They'd need to be very hungry to go after a man, and if you were that far off the beaten path you'd be in Alaska with Liam Neeson at your side w/rifle and A Set of Very Unique Skills to help, because that's how unusual the situation would be.

I don't go back country without a 45 revolver w/scandium frame, or my 9mm, both lightweight. Nor does anyone else with any brains. Not what you're asking, though.

If you want to live in fear of animals, try doing something about it via Sam Colt, a baton, pepper spray, brass knuckles, or whatever else is legal in your state. People are the problem 99% of the time in my extensive experience wandering cities one end of the country to the other, most recently Phoenix this past weekend. Deadliest thing out there are gangSTAS, not scorpions or similar smart enough to lay low in the day.
Well, when I said a stick, I wasn't talking about some foot-long branch on the ground. I meant a walking stick, l ike these, but I should be able to find it cheaper than this: Best Hiking Sticks | Best Walking Sticks - Brazos
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Old 08-23-2017, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
13,042 posts, read 7,205,994 times
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I see coyotes all the time on my late night dog walks. I worry about the Yorkie most of all. I used to see this big beautiful male coyote walking on the side walk ahead of us like he owned the place. He would slip into the shadows as soon as we got close enough. They don't bother me, I don't bother them.

This poor possum got hit by a car right in front of me while I was riding my bike at around 230am. I noticed her belly was moving after she died. I saw little ones in her pouch. I dragged her off of the road and went to get a box and some gloves to rescue the babies. When I got back about 5 minutes later, she was gone. I'm sure a coyote took her off and had a nice meal. It bothered me for weeks that I couldn't save the babies. They were pretty small.

The coyotes are all around our town. There are tons of rabbits and everyone I've seen looks healthy. I just don't want them to eat my Yorkie. I've stopped letting my dogs run around the park late at night.
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Old 08-23-2017, 09:33 AM
 
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I've seen coyotes a few times while driving to work in the morning just crossing the 6 lane road, when I lived in Tucson, AZ, going from wash to wash or shrub to shrub. They were all very scrawny looking. My older sister lives in the suburbs outside of Scranton, PA, in a typical neighborhood, not really out in the country, and saw a female black bear and her cub walk down the middle of her road once.
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Old 08-23-2017, 09:35 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
13,340 posts, read 10,911,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forever Blue View Post
But I'm talking about when you're in the city, amongst civilization/residential homes, etc. My SO & I live in the city & go walking pretty regularly. One of the places we go to is the college grounds of one of my alma maters. It's a tad going up towards the mtns. There's still homes above/around, but I'm sure there's the rare times when certain wildlife can wander down. For ex, during the summertime, they'll post signs that say watch out for snakes.

Yesterday, my SO and I were there. Off in the distance, for the 1st time there, I spot a coyote walking around & I've walked there about 10-15 Sun mornings before. It was pretty far away & walked behind a building out of sight, but I still walked at a good pace back to the car & my SO, of course, went along w/ me. He says they're only maybe aggressive & actually try to bite if they're hungry and/or in a pack.

It was a funny feeling being out in the open & vulnerable with a wild animal in my vicinity. That's never happened to me before...only when I'm at the zoo in which they're in cages!

I'm a little wary of walking on that campus now. But I like walking there & I'm quite shocked no one else walks there on Sundays because it's nice landscaping w/ inclines & it feels like you're kind of out in nature (even though there are bldgs all around), but my SO & I are the only ones really.

That's the first time we've seen a coyote there, so I guess from now on, we'll have a stick &/or mace.

I'm living in an urban environment for the first time in almost 30 years right now and I run across deer, yotes, badgers, skunks, raccoons and every wild animal I ever encountered on the ranch. Save a mountain lion. Not long ago I came up on a group of three nice bucks all in velvet just down from the hospital.


I wouldn't sweat coyotes if I were you. I've never heard of an attack on an adult human by a yote though rabid attacks have happened very rarely. Very. Rutting bucks are more dangerous. By sheer numbers there are more people seriously hurt by deer every year than every other critter combined. Coyotes in urban areas are actually pretty common. They thrive around people. Some mental midgets actually put out food for them and that is a VERY bad idea. One critter you really don't want hanging around is ol'Wiley. Especially if you have pets. Even large dogs. One on one yotes won't bother large dogs, but they will lure them out and pack them and domestic cat is a delicacy on coyotes menu.


I've heard of attacks on small children in urban areas, and I find that more than credible. In rural areas they get shot at. They are more respectful of people. In cities they lose that respect a bit. Especially if ignorant people feed them. Coyotes that are used to being fed will exact revenge when people wise up and stop. Usually by picking of smaller pets. If your really concerned a coyote might get to close (unlikely but possible) an emergency air horn for boating and such is as good as anything to startle one off.


The badger I ran across in a big vacant sagebrush area behind me startled me. And badgers concern me WAY more than coyotes. They have a generally poor disposition and require little to no provocation to get ornery if walked up on. Skunks can be unpleasant as well, but all these animals are usually much more active at night so encounters are less likely during the day.
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