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Old 05-19-2018, 11:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PotatoBug3 View Post
That nest looks like its made of spider web. Thats what they do. They need protein so the eat the little spiders and take the web. They build the nest of it and then stick pieces of moss and bark on it, whatever is local.

When I was a little girl I climbed a tree and saw out on a limb a humming bird sitting on what looked like a a little mossy stump. It was her nest. Made out of spiderweb and bark bits.

Have you ever seen Rubythroat courtship? The males do no care of the nest or eggs. But they sit on a high place and watch for females (and other males>fight). She alights on a branch. The male flies U shaped dive bombing swoops at her. Then finally, flies high into the air and makes a final swoop at top speed right past her head. He then returns and hovers before her in an upright position. Usually she just flies off.
There's a good reason why males don't participate in the process of building the nest, sitting on the eggs and feeding the babies. Their bright colors would give away the nest location to predators. Mom can do all of that and still be camouflaged and hard to see.

Last edited by marino760; 05-19-2018 at 11:51 AM..
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Old 05-20-2018, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PotatoBug3 View Post
That nest looks like its made of spider web. Thats what they do. They need protein so the eat the little spiders and take the web. They build the nest of it and then stick pieces of moss and bark on it, whatever is local.
One day I was sitting in my living room and I kept hearing this strange noise. I looked around and walked out on the porch following the noise. When I got out on the porch I found a hummingbird caught in a large spider web (we get some monstrous and very strong webs around here in the forest). He was really wrapped up in it. I pulled him out and just because I could I pet him for a few seconds and his little heart was beating against my fingers. I set him down so he could fly away because he wasn't flying out of my hand. He toppled over and lay there. I thought, oh oh... somethings wrong with him and I realized his legs weren't moving at all. I picked him back up and found that there was a strand of spider web wrapped around his legs pinning them together. Just one fine strand. I unwrapped it and it took off then.
Made me wonder how often something like that might happen where there's no one around to free it .
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Old 05-21-2018, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
There's a good reason why males don't participate in the process of building the nest, sitting on the eggs and feeding the babies. Their bright colors would give away the nest location to predators. Mom can do all of that and still be camouflaged and hard to see.
Not sure that's the reason. Males of many other colorful species help with nest duties. Also, you have to remember that birds can see a lot more colors that we can. Just because something looks "colorful" or "dull" to our eyesight, does not mean those hues seem "colorful" or "dull" to a creature which can see far into the ultraviolet and infrared. In fact, somewhere I read that some scientists speculate that "dull" colored female birds are actually spectacularly colored if you could see the ultraviolet or infrared hues on their feathers.
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Old 05-22-2018, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
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Originally Posted by James Bond 007 View Post
Not sure that's the reason. Males of many other colorful species help with nest duties. Also, you have to remember that birds can see a lot more colors that we can. Just because something looks "colorful" or "dull" to our eyesight, does not mean those hues seem "colorful" or "dull" to a creature which can see far into the ultraviolet and infrared. In fact, somewhere I read that some scientists speculate that "dull" colored female birds are actually spectacularly colored if you could see the ultraviolet or infrared hues on their feathers.
That's interesting. I didn't know that.
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Old 05-22-2018, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Bond 007 View Post
Not sure that's the reason. Males of many other colorful species help with nest duties. Also, you have to remember that birds can see a lot more colors that we can. Just because something looks "colorful" or "dull" to our eyesight, does not mean those hues seem "colorful" or "dull" to a creature which can see far into the ultraviolet and infrared. In fact, somewhere I read that some scientists speculate that "dull" colored female birds are actually spectacularly colored if you could see the ultraviolet or infrared hues on their feathers.
Thanks jb...something new I didn't know about birds...not that I'm an expert of course...
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Old 05-23-2018, 08:59 AM
 
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Here's a new picture of the babies a week after hatching. They both seem healthy and growing quickly. Mom spends less time at the nest but comes back often to feed them. She's probably spending most of her time getting food. They sometimes now sit with their heads pointed up in the air waiting for her.

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Old 05-23-2018, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
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That's pretty cool! I prob have several around here at the house considering all the hummers we have... but haven't a clue where one is.
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Old 05-23-2018, 09:27 AM
 
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Originally Posted by writerwife View Post
That's pretty cool! I prob have several around here at the house considering all the hummers we have... but haven't a clue where one is.
I'm sure you do. I just got lucky she build her nest where I can see it and take pictures.
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Old 05-23-2018, 06:47 PM
 
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I took a better picture later today.

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Old 05-23-2018, 07:02 PM
 
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Ahh, very sweet. They'll be gone before you know it, but the parents might raise a second family in the nest after they "renovate" it. Thanks for the pic!
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