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Old 10-22-2018, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,481 posts, read 14,283,094 times
Reputation: 8883

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A century ago, and presently in communities like the Amish, a child knew from the time he could lift a bucket that you NEVER put the barn bucket in the house well and vice versa. Anybody found violating that centuries old rule was severely punished. Those old timers did not know what viruses and bacteria were; they just knew the difference between good water and bad water.
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Old 10-22-2018, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,130 posts, read 10,560,296 times
Reputation: 9270
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
I guess I am wondering about "nature" in this sense and design . . . I may have wrongly assumed that the natural design worked for other species. You don't hear of mass deaths of birds, fish, mammals like squirrels, raccoons, skunks, et al - due to infections from their own defecation.

No one discloses when you buy a house that you may be subject to bird or squirrel defecation.

It doesn't seem to be a big problem . . .

On the other hand, human defecation is frequently cited as polluting land and waterways.

Are all of you saying there is no difference and that all of the other species are creating a great pollution to our neighborhoods, parks, and greater outdoor spaces?
Raccoons pose their own problems: What diseases do raccoons carry?.

Our CDC and other health organizations are always checking our migratory birds for signs of pathogens: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5443079/. Avian flu could pose a major health problem for humans and wildlife if it crosses the line from bird to human: https://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/f...out-bird-flu#1.
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Old 10-22-2018, 08:25 PM
 
522 posts, read 331,399 times
Reputation: 757
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
In the wild, every animal, reptile, and fish defecates, but only human defecation in the wild is considered disease producing.

We have to have processing plants to treat human defecation (not sure what happened before the advent of these plants), but every other creature "goes" outside and it's just fine - no problems.

Why is human defecation so toxic to land, water, other humans, etc.?

Where did you learn this 'Rubbish?'


(no pun intended)
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Old 10-23-2018, 03:11 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,013 posts, read 5,791,876 times
Reputation: 10454
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
In the wild, every animal, reptile, and fish defecates, but only human defecation in the wild is considered disease producing.

We have to have processing plants to treat human defecation (not sure what happened before the advent of these plants), but every other creature "goes" outside and it's just fine - no problems.

Why is human defecation so toxic to land, water, other humans, etc.?

Defecation is not feces, defecation is the bodily function of moving feces out of the body.


All feces from all living things is waste material that the body can't use and which poses a health hazard to all living things. There are NO exceptions and no living things are immune to the hazards of any kind of feces.


Sewage processing plants exist to treat and dispose of human sewage because there is so much of it in one place. Before there were sewers and processing plants to process human sewage people buried their feces in holes in the ground and then covered them up with dirt. This is done to avoid contamination and disease EPIDEMICS.


Some types of dirty, ignorant, careless, polluting people have been known to dispose of their feces in rivers and lakes and oceans.


Many types of carnivorous animals also bury their feces in the ground, or else they will defecate in hidden places out of the way where their feces won't be encountered anywhere near where they eat or have a nest.


Grazing herbivores and birds don't bury or hide their feces but they don't need to because they don't stay in one place. They are always on the move so there never gets to be too much of their own feces in any one place where it can contaminate their food or their environment.


Fishes defecate in the water where they swim and their feces sinks to the ground where it becomes buried or filtered by other marine organisms.


.
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Old 10-23-2018, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,838 posts, read 51,286,023 times
Reputation: 27642
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
I guess I am wondering about "nature" in this sense and design . . . I may have wrongly assumed that the natural design worked for other species. You don't hear of mass deaths of birds, fish, mammals like squirrels, raccoons, skunks, et al - due to infections from their own defecation.

No one discloses when you buy a house that you may be subject to bird or squirrel defecation.

It doesn't seem to be a big problem . . .

On the other hand, human defecation is frequently cited as polluting land and waterways.

Are all of you saying there is no difference and that all of the other species are creating a great pollution to our neighborhoods, parks, and greater outdoor spaces?
1. Die offs are counter-productive to any disease organism hoping to have new hosts to infect. Die offs are rare, while sickness is not.

2. Birds, fish, mammals like squirrels, raccoons, skunks, et al don't have their own news media with click-bait stories. Localized population die offs happen all the time from various causes. The fluctuations of the rabbit/fox populations are common and somewhat documented.
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:24 AM
 
736 posts, read 172,216 times
Reputation: 2062
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
In the wild, every animal, reptile, and fish defecates, but only human defecation in the wild is considered disease producing.

We have to have processing plants to treat human defecation (not sure what happened before the advent of these plants), but every other creature "goes" outside and it's just fine - no problems.

Why is human defecation so toxic to land, water, other humans, etc.?
I see you are as informed on this subject as you are on medicines and vaccines.
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:24 AM
 
5,458 posts, read 6,121,819 times
Reputation: 13944
Because people eat at McDonalds and the like?
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Old 10-23-2018, 12:30 PM
 
1,145 posts, read 854,703 times
Reputation: 1473
Weird question, but lots of interesting responses.

I heard about the dangers of hog slop ponds in NC overflowing due to the recent flooding. I wonder how they clean that up and if it poses any ongoing threat?
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Old 10-23-2018, 01:04 PM
 
Location: planet earth
2,885 posts, read 1,014,551 times
Reputation: 6527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Defecation is not feces, defecation is the bodily function of moving feces out of the body.


All feces from all living things is waste material that the body can't use and which poses a health hazard to all living things. There are NO exceptions and no living things are immune to the hazards of any kind of feces.


Sewage processing plants exist to treat and dispose of human sewage because there is so much of it in one place. Before there were sewers and processing plants to process human sewage people buried their feces in holes in the ground and then covered them up with dirt. This is done to avoid contamination and disease EPIDEMICS.


Some types of dirty, ignorant, careless, polluting people have been known to dispose of their feces in rivers and lakes and oceans.


Many types of carnivorous animals also bury their feces in the ground, or else they will defecate in hidden places out of the way where their feces won't be encountered anywhere near where they eat or have a nest.


Grazing herbivores and birds don't bury or hide their feces but they don't need to because they don't stay in one place. They are always on the move so there never gets to be too much of their own feces in any one place where it can contaminate their food or their environment.


Fishes defecate in the water where they swim and their feces sinks to the ground where it becomes buried or filtered by other marine organisms.


.
I think you covered everything!

Thank you.
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Old 10-23-2018, 01:11 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
1,650 posts, read 628,150 times
Reputation: 3298
A few points to consider on this subject:


-arboreal species (birds, squirrels, etc) don't care where they leave their droppings-- it falls to the ground and they don't get their food down there too often.


-many other species are somewhat fastidious about where they leave their droppings. Felines bury theirs; kept horses tend to leave it in one corner of the stall or paddock; migratory animals leave it and keep on walking and don't come back there 'til next yr.


-the overwhelming number of E.coli strains are NOT pathogenic. Some produce Shigella-like toxin, which causes a secretory diarrhea; only a few, rare strains are actually invasive, causing bloody diarrhea and making you very sick.


-E.coli only accounts for <5% of fecal material, but it's very easy to grow in the lab, so that's why they do "E.coli counts" as a measure of fecal contamination. Most of the other 95% are anaerobic-- very difficult to collect, get back to the lab and grow.


-While "wild" feces may contain ova, parasites & pathogenic bacteria, you need a pretty big exposure to actually get sick from it in most cases. Human feces is much more likely to contain bacteria and viruses that are pathogenic to humans than that from other species.
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