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Old 11-04-2018, 05:17 PM
Status: "It's winter!" (set 2 days ago)
 
7,950 posts, read 10,235,074 times
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Cats can have allergies and cough. Probably dogs, too. I've seen depressed pets, but garden variety "moody" because of the weather or a bad hair day, no. Some pets have had trauma and traumatic early years, which could manifest emotionally.
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Old 11-04-2018, 05:31 PM
 
Location: planet earth
3,220 posts, read 1,122,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Really? Another misanthropic thread? OP, you seem determined to find unfounded faults with human beings while putting animals on some anthropomorphic pedestal.

Animals cough. How would anyone accurately assess mood?
Please just scroll on with your pretentiousness. Thank you.
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Old 11-04-2018, 05:34 PM
 
Location: planet earth
3,220 posts, read 1,122,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
OP, TBH this thread follows the pattern so many others you pose do. You pose questions in a vague rather judgmental way (why do only humans have such and such...why don't animals do such and such like people do) and get responses you don't like or clarifying questions you can't brush off. Next, you re-direct and qualify the original questions in order to justify them. You get more responses you don't like, you continue to dodge, deflect and argue the point that is getting less and less clear. You just can't let it go. The forum ends up in a pointless multi-page argument. In other words, wasted time and effort. My impression is that what you really want is an excuse to argue, not an actual answer to the question.

Animals do not do things for the exact same reason or in the same manner that humans do. They are not going to start. They are not right or wrong, not better or worse, less or more. They are just different. You say you are a curious person. Fine. A curious person who wants to know why an animal does something a human may not should know there are plenty of information sources out there. However, it's a lot harder to start an argument with a reference than an anonymous forum isn't it? No fun accepting what the reference says. There's more going on here than mere curiosity.

As for others not having a clue about what you mean, what you meant, or what you want, have to fully agree with that. Have doubts whether you do either.
Thanks for your judgmental post.

I have stated why I start "these threads." It is out of curiosity about species specific things. I am interested in psychology, sociology, anthropology and species specific behaviors.

If my queries are of no interest to you, please feel free to avoid them. Thank you.
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Old 11-04-2018, 05:37 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
28,807 posts, read 2,271,865 times
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We had a cat, who had lung cancer. She coughed. We have had other cats who had respiratory infections, & guess what, they coughed too.

I can assure you, cats & dogs have moods too. I think all creatures do, to some extent.
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Old 11-04-2018, 05:42 PM
 
Location: planet earth
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I wish I could express myself better. I realize that this thread was very rudimentary and unskilled.

The kind of coughing I am thinking of is a throat tickling that will not stop, no-matter-what, and it can go on for several hours. Maybe most people are not familiar with such a cough, therefore, they think my inquiry is stupid.

I also did not frame the second part of the inquiry correctly. I was not really asking about "feeling states," as much as fleeting moods, that don't seem to be triggered by anything specific in the environment. People have these kinds of moods - not sure about other animals . . . just curious about animals and moods. I wonder if animals have long-term grief (I don't think so - I think they cycle through feeling states quickly, and mostly live in the present).

There are probably scholarly articles on this subject, of which I am unaware.
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Old 11-04-2018, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
7,320 posts, read 2,291,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willamette City View Post
You're probably right about that. Cultured aquarium fish do behave differently from wild fish. I think I've heard that Betas are feisty fish. Hopefully there is a human around to help them out, otherwise it's "so long cruel world!"
Maybe those who keep betas should install a moat around the outside of their bowls, to catch them, if they jump out. That bass I kept in a tank would jump several inches out of the water, to grab worms that I dangled. I had some friends who had a giant tank that filled a whole bedroom, to keep a pair of South American "monkey fish" or arowanas. They would pin large nightcrawlers to the ceiling several feet above and the fish would take turns leaping all the way up for them. It was amazing how they observed that protocol of taking turns, so there were never any clashes that might have been injurious, as they are big, powerful fish.
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Old 11-04-2018, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,637 posts, read 26,354,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
I wish I could express myself better. I realize that this thread was very rudimentary and unskilled.

The kind of coughing I am thinking of is a throat tickling that will not stop, no-matter-what, and it can go on for several hours. Maybe most people are not familiar with such a cough, therefore, they think my inquiry is stupid.

I also did not frame the second part of the inquiry correctly. I was not really asking about "feeling states," as much as fleeting moods, that don't seem to be triggered by anything specific in the environment. People have these kinds of moods - not sure about other animals . . . just curious about animals and moods. I wonder if animals have long-term grief (I don't think so - I think they cycle through feeling states quickly, and mostly live in the present).

There are probably scholarly articles on this subject, of which I am unaware.
Differences in anatomy may result in differences in coughing from species to species. Your question is really one without substance.

People have already told you that their pets do have mood changes, very noticeable ones.

As far as grief is concerned, animals certainly do feel it, and for some it can be long lasting.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b...imal-companion

https://www.thedodo.com/rare-photo-o...446468544.html

BBC - Earth - Chimps filmed grieving for dead friend
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Old 11-04-2018, 06:28 PM
 
Location: planet earth
3,220 posts, read 1,122,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Differences in anatomy may result in differences in coughing from species to species. Your question is really one without substance.

People have already told you that their pets do have mood changes, very noticeable ones.

As far as grief is concerned, animals certainly do feel it, and for some it can be long lasting.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b...imal-companion

https://www.thedodo.com/rare-photo-o...446468544.html

BBC - Earth - Chimps filmed grieving for dead friend
Once again, you do not perceive what I am asking about.

It's fine.

My questions were not thought out.

The responses have been nothing I have not observed myself. I know animals have "moods." I was inquiring about something I explained in a previous post.

P.S. There is a sub-set of people who live for nothing other than criticizing others. I suspect you are in this category, as are others who have insulted me. None could resist the urge to criticize and "move on." Had to get your two cents in, no matter if unhelpful or not!
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Old 11-04-2018, 08:34 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,115 posts, read 5,877,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post

On the moods - I should have been more specific - humans can cry - ugly cries, with noises, nose blowing, etc., and can go on and on . . . I know animals cry too, because I have seen tears . . . but I have never heard them cry, or seen any animal I know just burst out crying. I do remember when I was burying a cat another cat "cried" (kind of howled) - but it was short-lived - it didn't go on-and-on, and then she seemed to be fine and went on with her business.

Other animals just seem to "shake it off" much easier than humans (and that is another subject - dogs actually shake to wake themselves up or something - not sure what the exact purpose is) . . .

And I have seen dogs and cats kind of "down" (depressed), but I am not talking about that - I am talking about quickly changing "moods" and crying (which I forgot to add - lol).

Crying and weeping is a response to emotional stress and/or pain. Many kinds of baby animals will do the kind of crying you're talking about while they're still very young and confused and have their parents present to protect them. But animals in general instinctively know they can't afford to indulge themselves for very long in crying brought on by emotional stress / grief. They will usually internalize their stress instead and it might manifest externally in other more subtle ways.

Unless an animal is in such extreme pain that it can't stop itself from crying in pain, it's a survival instinct to not cry because crying attracts predators and no animal wants to attract the attention of predators to itself. Especially not if it is in a weakened state and unable to protect itself.


.
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Old 11-04-2018, 08:38 PM
 
Location: planet earth
3,220 posts, read 1,122,425 times
Reputation: 7135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Many kinds of baby animals will do the kind of crying you're talking about while they're still very young and confused and have their parents present to protect them. But animals in general instinctively know they can't afford to indulge themselves for very long in crying brought on by emotional stress / grief. They will usually internalize their stress instead and it might manifest externally in other more subtle ways.

Unless an animal is in extreme pain and can't stop itself from crying in pain, it's a survival instinct to not cry because crying attracts predators and no animal wants to attract the attention of predators. Especially not if it is in a weakened state and unable to protect itself.


.
This makes a lot of sense. I am sure there are scholarly studies that outline these basic features of mammal experiences/capabilities. I am just not aware of them, and of course, nothing like this is ever address in school.

I didn't know that baby animals "cried" and carried on.

I wonder why human babies cry so much. That "should" be evolved out, as it is very irritating and I am sure, does not result in their greater care.
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