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Old 11-04-2018, 09:26 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post

I wonder why human babies cry so much. That "should" be evolved out, as it is very irritating and I am sure, does not result in their greater care.

There are a lot of valid reasons for why human babies cry more than adults do. If you're really curious about why human babies cry then you should ask about it in the parenting forum.


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Old 11-04-2018, 09:54 PM
 
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An animal that is not domesticated that would have a chronic cough would likely be an easy target for any of its natural prey and culled. So you would not observe them very often, if at all, depending on the type of animal, its natural habitat and cycle of environmental activity.

I recall learning an interesting lesson as a young child when my older brother did a scientific test for a science class in high school. I can't recall all the details - it was set up in our basement and it had to do with chickens behavior. I observed how if there was one weak sickly chicken the others would essentially kill it if it could not be separated.

So unless you want humans to start going 'nature native' you may not want to ask such questions.


Parallel thought, If animals had healthcare, how would they treat preexisting conditions?

And how would they feel about predators or an overpopulation of another species invading their territory and denuding environmental resources?


Nature is not kind.
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Old 11-04-2018, 10:08 PM
 
Location: planet earth
3,275 posts, read 1,137,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
There are a lot of valid reasons for why human babies cry more than adults do. If you're really curious about why human babies cry then you should ask about it in the parenting forum.


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I am not interested in the observation of parents . . . I am interested in the biological, social, and evolutionary reasons for screaming babies, compared with other species.

This is the Nature forum, right? I am interested in nature and how species interact and evolve.
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Old 11-04-2018, 10:11 PM
 
Location: planet earth
3,275 posts, read 1,137,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ciceropolo View Post
An animal that is not domesticated that would have a chronic cough would likely be an easy target for any of its natural prey and culled. So you would not observe them very often, if at all, depending on the type of animal, its natural habitat and cycle of environmental activity.

I recall learning an interesting lesson as a young child when my older brother did a scientific test for a science class in high school. I can't recall all the details - it was set up in our basement and it had to do with chickens behavior. I observed how if there was one weak sickly chicken the others would essentially kill it if it could not be separated.

So unless you want humans to start going 'nature native' you may not want to ask such questions.


Parallel thought, If animals had healthcare, how would they treat preexisting conditions?

And how would they feel about predators or an overpopulation of another species invading their territory and denuding environmental resources?


Nature is not kind.
On the chickens . . . I am sure what you are referring to are basics of animal husbandry or whatever it is when people study animals.

If anyone knows the branch of science that deals with animal habits and customs, please advise. I need to read up on the basics.
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Old 11-04-2018, 10:24 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,132 posts, read 5,883,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
On the chickens . . . I am sure what you are referring to are basics of animal husbandry or whatever it is when people study animals.

If anyone knows the branch of science that deals with animal habits and customs, please advise. I need to read up on the basics.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethology


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Old 11-04-2018, 10:35 PM
 
Location: planet earth
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Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
This is fantastic! Thank you.

I went to Amazon and there are so many books on the subject . . . not sure where to start. I would love kind of an encyclopedia type book with particular animal descriptions on a page or two . . . this looks so rich.

The categories that are studied: Habits, aggression, mating, etc., are all fascinating to me.
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Old 11-05-2018, 05:26 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
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Well, we have a parakeet that talks and imitates about every sound she likes. With the allergies and respiratory cruds her human flock members have on a regular basis, that little bird sounds like she's got the worst cold, as she accurately imitates our coughs, sneezes and sniffles. She'll even say "Bless you"( sounds like Bess you), "s'cuse me", and "thank you" after she does those respiratory imitations.

But moody? I don't think I've ever seen that little bird in anything but an exhuberant happy playful mood.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
2,382 posts, read 2,133,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
My cats have moods. One of my cats can be real moody.

My husband passed and I moved. My cat went into depression for a few months and had to be medicated to eat. She's better now tho.
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Old 11-05-2018, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Maine
5,979 posts, read 11,174,129 times
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You'd gain a lot by spending a lot more time observing nature. You make a lot of inaccurate assumptions based on lack of experience. We learn better when we do than when we read someone else's information. A sit spot would be a great start.
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Old 11-05-2018, 01:25 PM
 
1,393 posts, read 557,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
I was just thinking how some humans have coughing fits that go on and on for hours on end, and that I had never observed any other animal having such fits of coughing.

On the moods - I should have been more specific - humans can cry - ugly cries, with noises, nose blowing, etc., and can go on and on . . . I know animals cry too, because I have seen tears . . . but I have never heard them cry, or seen any animal I know just burst out crying. I do remember when I was burying a cat another cat "cried" (kind of howled) - but it was short-lived - it didn't go on-and-on, and then she seemed to be fine and went on with her business.

Other animals just seem to "shake it off" much easier than humans (and that is another subject - dogs actually shake to wake themselves up or something - not sure what the exact purpose is) . . .

And I have seen dogs and cats kind of "down" (depressed), but I am not talking about that - I am talking about quickly changing "moods" and crying (which I forgot to add - lol).
I have. I had a yorkie who loved to play with tennis balls. Unfortunately, like many small dogs, he had bad teeth and at every cleaning he would lose at least one. When he lost most of his teeth he could no longer pick up the tennis ball and he broke down and cried and got so frustrated that he couldn't pick up the ball. It hit me, so I immediately went out in search of something he could pick up and found felt covered Styrofoam balls made for cats. He was so happy because he could get his whole mouth around them. They came in a two pack and one would last several weeks before it crushed and I was so afraid of running out I bought every pack in the store and when they resupplied I bought every pack again. He also, if we went away and left him with my mom, would upon return sit on the couch facing the wall with his butt to us. We would laugh and coax him with his favorite treat until he forgave us for leaving him.
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