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Old 11-24-2018, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Brazil
160 posts, read 93,560 times
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Here is the fascinating story of a guy in England who raised a crow:

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-be...-crows-as-pets

Interestingly, they often played a prominent role in ancient mythology:

Quote:
In Norse mythology, Huginn (from Old Norse "thought") and Muninn (Old Norse "memory" or "mind") are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world, Midgard, and bring information to the god Odin. [...] In the Poetic Edda, a disguised Odin expresses that he fears that they may not return from their daily flights. The Prose Edda explains that Odin is referred to as "raven-god" due to his association with Huginn and Muninn. In the Prose Edda and the Third Grammatical Treatise, the two ravens are described as perching on Odin's shoulders. Heimskringla details that Odin gave Huginn and Muninn the ability to speak.
Huginn and Muninn sit on Odin's shoulders in an illustration from an 18th-century Icelandic manuscript:
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The amazing intelligence of the crow-odin_hrafnar.jpg  
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Old 11-24-2018, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Brazil
160 posts, read 93,560 times
Reputation: 194
They also played an important role among Native Americans:

Mod cut: Copyrighted material.

On this story, they would warn Brother Buffalo so that it would not get hunted (as a matter of fact, they do it among themselves, and not only that, they have a partnership with wolves, and they communicate with them):

[snip]


Article Archives: How The Crow Became Black

Their partneship with wolves:

[snip]


10 Incredible Facts About Ravens - Listverse

[snip]


https://forestsociety.org/something-...t-opportunists

Last edited by PJSaturn; 12-07-2018 at 09:27 AM..
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Old 11-24-2018, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Brazil
160 posts, read 93,560 times
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^ By "crow" I was referring to "the crow family" (corvids), i.e, both crows and ravens, and other members of this family:

Mod cut: Copyrighted material.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corvidae
https://www.diffen.com/difference/Crow_vs_Raven

Last edited by PJSaturn; 12-07-2018 at 09:27 AM..
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Old 11-24-2018, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
7,440 posts, read 2,340,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joao View Post
^ By "crow" I was referring to "the crow family" (corvids), i.e, both crows and ravens, and other members of this family:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corvidae
https://www.diffen.com/difference/Crow_vs_Raven
One day, my big, orange cat made the mistake of catching a newly-fledged corvid, a scrub jay. He was immediately mobbed by a dozen adults and within a minute, many more converged from all over the area. They forced him to let the young bird go, that hopped up through a bush, to a tall tree.

But for years, whenever that cat would show himself during daylight, the jays would attack him and drive him to cover. They never forgave him for his grabbing of the fledgling. I'm sure that many of them were not alive, when that original event occurred, but they communicated across the generations, that he was a marked cat.

His mother, who was the same color, was never bothered by the jays, as she was a rodent specialist and never tried to catch birds.
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Old 11-25-2018, 06:34 AM
 
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There are tons of ravens here where I recently relocated. I was so excited when I thought they were crows. They make some cool noises, apparently mimicking cell phone noises they've heard. Last week at work I asked my co-worker in the next cubicle "is that your phone?" And he answered "are you talking about the bird?" At the dog park they sit in the trees and make strangeb cell phone noises.
I've heard they're as smart as crows but they seem more like seagulls theway they ravage dumpsters.
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Old 11-30-2018, 01:42 PM
 
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cool thread subject.

just thought i would add that the closely related raven is one of the few birds tough enough to stay in the arctic all winter.

http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/...x%C5%9Ehop.Com
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Old 11-30-2018, 03:08 PM
 
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This is a good thread.
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Old 12-07-2018, 01:36 PM
 
Location: NW Indiana
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When I was growing up, my grandparents lived in the house in back of ours, so our yards connected and we walked back and forth every day. Two summers in a row a crow took up residence in my grandparents' backyard and provided lots of entertainment for us. Grandma named him "Blacky" (real original, huh? ).


We would sit in lawn chairs and Blacky would come very close to us and dance around and talk in his own bird jibberish. He would collect shiny objects and cache them in a spot in the yard. By the end of each summer, the pile was quite large. There were pieces of aluminum foil, buttons, small children's toys, pebbles, and also colorful pieces of cloth. Blacky would strut around, as if to say, "Check out my stash, everybody!" Those two summers, Grandpa went around the pile with the lawn mower and left the cache undisturbed. Grandma used to say Blacky spoke some human words, though I never heard them. But it sure seemed as though he were trying!


Happy memories of a friendly crow.


.
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Old 12-07-2018, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
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There's already a thread from just a few months ago on the intelligence of crows:

Crows, their intelligence
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Old 12-07-2018, 05:09 PM
 
Location: northern New England
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In reading about birdfeeders online, I was surprised to find out that grackles are so smart, they have figured out how to bypass the feeders that use the bird's weight to shut the seed ports (keeping out larger birds). They flap their wings while eating to decrease their weight. Bird brains indeed!!
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