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Old Yesterday, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Midwest
3,849 posts, read 6,810,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Writer View Post
We had them in our woodlot. They came to a four foot wide seasonal stream that runs through our property. The four foot wide stream became a five acre bog. They cut down a lot of trees we intended to harvest ten years from now to use as firewood and killed maples we tapped for syrup. Beavers are brilliant engineers that can do a lot of damage before they're noticed. They weren't around this year. I think the bobcats and/or bears were able to catch up to them. We destroyed their dam and let the land drain. Grass and sedges are growing again. They'll be back. We're watching for them.
GO bobcats!
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Old Today, 05:17 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
1,871 posts, read 691,560 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post

I remember visiting Florence and doing the obligatory stroll across the Ponte Vecchio. I was surprised to see numerouis Neutria swimming in the Arno.

Are you sure those were Nutria and not rats--REAL BIG RATS?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post

These habitats are teeming with all manner of wildlife and vegetation that would not otherwise be there if the beavers had not created the abundant wetlands for them to thrive in.

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The beaver are certainly an important part of the ecosystem, but the topography/geology & history (melting glaciers) have more to do with the basic ecology of the biome than the presence of the beavers.


Someone correctly pointed out earlier here that the beavers are an important part in the cyclic succession of the ecosystem. That operates on a centuries-long time scale. Humans tend to like to get things done on yearly or single-decade times scales, thus the conflict.
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Old Today, 06:17 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,244 posts, read 5,942,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post


Are you sure those were Nutria and not rats--REAL BIG RATS?

There are nutria in the Arno. You can find videos of them on youtube. Nutria were introduced by fur farmers to several countries during the 20th century and the offspring of those that were released or escaped have become an invasive species in many parts of Europe. The following map shows the distribution of nutria in Europe.


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...ria-Europe.gif





Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post

The beaver are certainly an important part of the ecosystem, but the topography/geology & history (melting glaciers) have more to do with the basic ecology of the biome than the presence of the beavers.


Someone correctly pointed out earlier here that the beavers are an important part in the cyclic succession of the ecosystem. That operates on a centuries-long time scale. Humans tend to like to get things done on yearly or single-decade times scales, thus the conflict.

Yes, glaciers played a huge role in the topography of North America, and Canada in particular. And then beavers later played a huge role in fixing and terraforming a lot of the mess the glaciers left behind them after the glaciers receded. There are many factors at play but without the beavers North America wouldn't be what it is today.

Okay, I'm simplifying and shortening this but see, what happened is when the glaciers were increasing and spreading across the continent they bulldozed all the top soil in the north completely off right down to the bedrock, to the igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks that forms the ancient billion year old geological core of the North American continent. They bulldozed the topsoil to the south and when the glaciers finally melted/receded, the top soil they had ground down and pushed ahead of them was all left behind in the southern part of the continent (now known as USA).

Canada had been scraped down into a flattened plateau, down to raw rock that was pocked with many millions of craterous holes that the glaciers had gouged out of the rock in their progress and when the glaciers receded these holes became filled in with meltwater - they are the many millions of lakes that now exist in Canada. Eventually, after the return of a very thin layer of vegetation and trees in some places the beavers came and played the role of terraforming and building up and transforming much of the area in Canada that is now known as the Canadian Shield. The beavers' continuous terraforming and dam building spread across the land and caused more streams and rivers and more lakes and then millions of wetlands and hillocks to be formed and, most importantly, the development of fertile soil again. The crust of rock that had been exposed by the glaciers, also known as the North American Craton, actually extends from Greenland to Northern Mexico, it's not just in Canada.


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Old Today, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,473 posts, read 10,803,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Canada had been scraped down into a flattened plateau, down to raw rock that was pocked with many millions of craterous holes that the glaciers had gouged out of the rock in their progress and when the glaciers receded these holes became filled in with meltwater - they are the many millions of lakes that now exist in Canada. Eventually, after the return of a very thin layer of vegetation and trees in some places the beavers came and played the role of terraforming and building up and transforming much of the area in Canada that is now known as the Canadian Shield. The beavers' continuous terraforming and dam building spread across the land and caused more streams and rivers and more lakes and then millions of wetlands and hillocks to be formed and, most importantly, the development of fertile soil again. The crust of rock that had been exposed by the glaciers, also known as the North American Craton, actually extends from Greenland to Northern Mexico, it's not just in Canada.
The glaciers were not the only ones doing the bulldozing that affected the beavers. Humans, in their quest for interstate transportation on modern roads, have created living space for many of our beavers. As you travel across our interstate roads you will see many places, that were originally set aside as holding ponds for the runoff, and are now used by beavers. So what the ice destroyed, humans in a small way, helped the spread of nature's chainsaws.
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