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Old 12-30-2018, 07:11 PM
 
Location: West Virginia
12,192 posts, read 30,367,595 times
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https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/on...RDS?li=BBnb7Kz
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Old Yesterday, 05:58 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
13,371 posts, read 11,096,607 times
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Hmmm. Seems they need to try and isolate whatever this infection causing agent is. Not an easy task. Here in N NV not far from where I live the state has a huge facility for wild horse management purposes. Our wild horse herds are suffering a bit too but not from strange infections. Unless human supidity can be considered to be such.


The herd "management" methods are just head scratching and jaw droppingly insane. The wild horse Replaced the Desert Bighorn sheep as the official state animal a few years back. Something that we NV lifers didn't care for to much. The wild horse advocacy groups pretty much run the show now with herd management. Most of the people who make up these groups are not actually horse people.


The state personnel who run the facility and organize the round ups and culling operations have few actual horse people calling the shots. Hopefully there are some real horse folks working with this pony herd. An issue like this infection will require having experienced horsemen and razor sharp equine vets.


Sounds like they have a daunting task at hand and from what I gleaned from the article sounds like this pony herd is well managed. But as any experienced horseman will tell you bird dogging a herd especially a wild one is a persnickety job on a good day. These strange and unexpected issues have caused many a case of baldness as hair gets torn out trying to figure them out.


Our herds here are grossly mismanaged. I'm thinking it wont be long before some wild diseases and such will start popping up on a large scale. Culling operations now unlike in the past see the healthy and well put together animals separated and adopted out, sold whatever and all the trash get turned back onto the range. Needless to say herd health is suffering.


There's a lot of complicating factors dictating the wild horse management policies. Factors being laid down by people who are loud and ...passionate...but who don't know a thing about horses. At any rate I wish them all the best with this pony herd. This is not a problem I would relish the thought of trying to figure out.
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Old Yesterday, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,654 posts, read 10,913,376 times
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I am curious if the recent hurricanes played a roll in this disease. The island was affected by Sandy, Florence, Michael and I presume others. In some cases the ponies were standing in water for days and that probably did not help. Plus the sea probably stirred up the swamps and caused a lot of erosion (possibly exposing bacteria or disease).

I just think it is too early to point the finger at global warming unless we are blaming the hurricanes on global warming. Although there is a possibility that a rising sea level is also a game changer?
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Old Yesterday, 10:13 AM
 
Location: West Virginia
12,192 posts, read 30,367,595 times
Reputation: 7737
Then add to it all the rain we had in 2018!

NV the same vet been caring for the ponies for 30 years. & there are Teams of vets out there 24/7
I hope they get the Vaccine oked
Wonder if there be a round up this year.... I hate to have this problem spread
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Old Today, 07:07 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,033 posts, read 732,838 times
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Fisheye & Katie are both right-- extra wet lately..nothing to do with that 0.013*C rise in temps since last year.


In regards NV's comment about herd management & lobbyists (usually TreeHuggers)- it's not that they don't know horses, it's that they know nothing about population management in a limited habitat. You must cull the herd periodically-- something the bleeding hearts don't like. They're not being kind in the long run.


Also keep in mind, the NC island ponies are an invasive species there. At what point do we call a feral population of escaped domestic animals "wild & natural?" What is our obligation to managing them?


Any population confined to a small geographic area is prone to diseases that may be more likely to drop its population below a sustainable level than if it was not confined. That's how MotherNature works.
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Old Today, 12:13 PM
 
Location: NW Nevada
13,371 posts, read 11,096,607 times
Reputation: 12381
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Fisheye & Katie are both right-- extra wet lately..nothing to do with that 0.013*C rise in temps since last year.


In regards NV's comment about herd management & lobbyists (usually TreeHuggers)- it's not that they don't know horses, it's that they know nothing about population management in a limited habitat. You must cull the herd periodically-- something the bleeding hearts don't like. They're not being kind in the long run.


Also keep in mind, the NC island ponies are an invasive species there. At what point do we call a feral population of escaped domestic animals "wild & natural?" What is our obligation to managing them?


Any population confined to a small geographic area is prone to diseases that may be more likely to drop its population below a sustainable level than if it was not confined. That's how MotherNature works.

Yes these wild horse advocacy groups ram rodding the mustang herd management here are mostly bunny huggers. And most of them are not horse savvy. The mustangs are an invasive species here as well. And these groups rammed making them the state animal down our throats. "Culling" now means rounding up, separating the good horses from the dinks, sending the good ones out for actual use and turning the dinks back out on the range because the advocacy groups wont see them turned to dog food. Which is all they are good for.

Truly these wild horse advocates that are now running the show know NOTHING about herd management. Feed on the range that these inbred missile head, roman nosed hammer headed dinks are being turned back out on is hardly unlimited and is competed for by grazing cattle. Finding good, healthy and strong animals in the mustang herds is becoming tough. At the pint we are at now turning fresh blood out would not work. We are stuck with ugly, useless feral animals depleting resources and nothing more.


I totally agree that our obligation to manage feral animals is limited to damage control in the end. As in stopping the damage which would involve the use of a few 30 06s. Indeed these advocacy groups have done the horses no favors long term.
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