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Old Yesterday, 05:17 PM
 
Location: on the wind
5,391 posts, read 2,086,221 times
Reputation: 18777

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Quote:
Originally Posted by coyote lite View Post
Aww, think positively. Maybe you can dangle a carrot in front of his nose and have him follow you as you jog up and down the road. That way you get your exercise as the clothes dry. When you get home, drop the carrot in the laundry basket and the now-dry clothes will fall right in as he dips his head. Win-win!
I can tell you've never met a moose. They are not very prone to suggestion from anyone unless they happen to be driving heavy equipment.
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Old Yesterday, 08:15 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,512 posts, read 6,117,212 times
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My first thought was emu but when I enlarged the picture and saw the back legs better, and that it was hair and not feathers on its back I thought maybe an elk so I guess that is close enough to moose. Great picture and I think you should contribute it to your local newspaper for a laugh. I imagine it wouldn't take long for people up there to correctly guess what it is.

Poor little orphan, it's good that he's safe in your neighbourhood for now but I hope he will have learned by summer to not be habituated to humans and human habitations. Otherwise he could become a more dangerous nuisance to people and properties by next autumn and that could cause the death of him. There is no way I would want a growing young bull moose living in my neighbourhood.

.
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Old Today, 02:01 AM
 
Location: on the wind
5,391 posts, read 2,086,221 times
Reputation: 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
My first thought was emu but when I enlarged the picture and saw the back legs better, and that it was hair and not feathers on its back I thought maybe an elk so I guess that is close enough to moose. Great picture and I think you should contribute it to your local newspaper for a laugh. I imagine it wouldn't take long for people up there to correctly guess what it is.

Poor little orphan, it's good that he's safe in your neighbourhood for now but I hope he will have learned by summer to not be habituated to humans and human habitations. Otherwise he could become a more dangerous nuisance to people and properties by next autumn and that could cause the death of him. There is no way I would want a growing young bull moose living in my neighbourhood.

.
Good thing most people here know better than to encourage him, feed him, or approach him. He's probably already learned not to expect any handouts. There is native browse for him and he can roam quite a large area without crossing a busy road. The stronger more aggressive adults probably bully him away from the best habitat but he is surviving on the margins. As long as he stays where he is he should be OK unless we get a huge dump of snow or prolonged extreme cold. He still has a lot of winter to survive, and easily accessible browse will get scarcer before spring arrives.
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Old Today, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,353 posts, read 7,429,839 times
Reputation: 12932
I have read about these things too many times.
"Oh, he is sooo cute!"
"I hope he survives and grows up in our neighborhood, it will be so neat to have him around as an adult!"


As he grows, too many neighbors forget that he IS a wild animal, not a pet.
Sooner or later, as an adult, he attacks and injures or kills somebody, or damages property. When he weighs nearly a thousand pounds and has antlers 4 feet wide, it won't be so cute to have him trying to get at the dried grass under your porch.
While he is still small he needs to be relocated to where he belongs, in the wild instead of living with people. For HIS safety, as well as the safety of the community.


Not so long ago I read about somebody who had an orphan whitetail buck hanging out in their back yard. They considered him a pet, until he grew up and became a 150 pound buck with a 4x4 rack of antlers. As should have been expected, one day he took offense at something, and attacked, resulting in abdominal injuries requiring surgery.
He wasn't so cute after that!


Remember, "Bambi" is NOT an accurate depiction of Nature!



Good luck.
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Old Today, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Midwestern U.S.
345 posts, read 175,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
I can tell you've never met a moose. They are not very prone to suggestion from anyone unless they happen to be driving heavy equipment.

I've heard that, haha! I prefer to watch my wildlife through a telephoto lens. I get to see them up close and personal, and they aren't stressed by my presence.


Redraven brings up a point that can't be emphasized enough: no matter how cute, they're not plush toys. I've been lucky enough to visit Yellowstone Park a few times, and am always horrified at the stupid humans getting too close. And thinking it's funny! Who in their right mind thinks it's funny to upset or antagonize wild animals?
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Old Today, 04:58 PM
 
Location: on the wind
5,391 posts, read 2,086,221 times
Reputation: 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redraven View Post
I have read about these things too many times.
"Oh, he is sooo cute!"
"I hope he survives and grows up in our neighborhood, it will be so neat to have him around as an adult!"


As he grows, too many neighbors forget that he IS a wild animal, not a pet.
Sooner or later, as an adult, he attacks and injures or kills somebody, or damages property. When he weighs nearly a thousand pounds and has antlers 4 feet wide, it won't be so cute to have him trying to get at the dried grass under your porch.
While he is still small he needs to be relocated to where he belongs, in the wild instead of living with people. For HIS safety, as well as the safety of the community.


Not so long ago I read about somebody who had an orphan whitetail buck hanging out in their back yard. They considered him a pet, until he grew up and became a 150 pound buck with a 4x4 rack of antlers. As should have been expected, one day he took offense at something, and attacked, resulting in abdominal injuries requiring surgery.
He wasn't so cute after that!


Remember, "Bambi" is NOT an accurate depiction of Nature!



Good luck.
You must be assuming this is downtown Anchorage. It's not. Moose are common, expected, and ordinary residents here. No one will be "relocating" him anywhere. Ridiculous and unnecessary. Attempting to do anything about him is ten times more hazardous for the moose and for the humans than leaving him alone. If/when he survives to grow antlers that big there's no way he'll be reaching under the deck! Most of the local moose browse a circuit. I probably won't see him for a week or so. Most of my property is woodland so he probably spends most nights there because it provides thermal cover.

I have never seen a moose do anything like this before which was the point of taking the photo. Unusual. I don't do anything to encourage this sort of behavior and certainly don't need your little lecture. I have lived, worked (retired after 36 years as a federal wildlife biologist), and generally coexisted peacefully with moose for decades.

Last edited by Parnassia; Today at 06:00 PM..
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Old Today, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,353 posts, read 7,429,839 times
Reputation: 12932
My "lecture" was a general statement of fact. It was not addressed specifically to the OP. I was not aware of exactly where the OP lives, and don't really care.
The basis of the "lecture", and the people it was intended for, are those who are subject to the "Bambi" and "Winnie the Pooh" syndromes: All animals found in Nature are fuzzy and cuddly.
NO, they are NOT!
We are into a new year. Soon the tourist season will start, and we will be maintaining a new score card for Yellowstone National Park. It begins with:
Tourists: 0
Wildlife: 0
Nature: 0

Shortly after Memorial Day it will be:
Tourists: 0
Wildlife: 1
Nature: 1
By Labor Day, it will be:
Tourists: 0
Wildlife: 5 (or more)
Nature: 2 (or more)


wildlife=Bison, Bears, Elk, etc.
Nature= hot pools, boiling mud pots, geysers, etc.
Tourists=Those who the "lecture" was aimed at. It is, of course, an exercise in futility. None of those tourists pay any attention to rules of conduct. They have been too brainwashed by Disney, Bob Clampett, Looney Toons, etc. They KNOW the animals are well trained and domesticated, and the natural features are turned off every night and turned back on at 0600 every morning, and thermostats keep the temperatures within human tolerances.
It is amazing what questions are asked of Park Rangers!
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