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Old 03-18-2019, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
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Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
That isn't dog communication, its something it has learned from the other beings it happens to live with.

I was talking about dog communication among themselves. They communicate with each other by things like how they hold their tail, ears, body in general; things like the play bow, etc. This is learned in the litter and why it is important that you do not remove them too young. Polite dogs do not meet each other head-on or make direct eye contact, that's why some dogs are so reactive on leashes (it forces an impolite meeting of dogs).

You can see a huge difference between dogs who were from very small litters and/or pups taken at too young of an age. They (generally) do not socialize well as an older dog because they did not learn to "speak" dog.

Dogs seem to work better with body language over verbal, so when I trained mine, I used hand signals in conjunction with verbal, and he always responds better to the hand signal.
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Old 03-18-2019, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
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Our dogs recently met a Romanian dog and her accent was so heavy our dogs could not understand a word she said.
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Old 03-18-2019, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Northern panhandle WV
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I believe that animals can communicate with like animals where ever they are located, but how they communicate with humans is different based on the human language used. For instance man K-9 dogs are trained in German and that is what you have to use when communicating commands to them.
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Old 03-18-2019, 03:00 PM
 
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I would think they do understand each other because a bark is a bark. They also communicate by holding their heads a certain way, ears a certain way, wag their tail- or not. A lot of the communication is body language.


However, as with dogs and cats (and maybe other animals also), they only understand the language of the culture they are raised/ live in.


I had foreign born grandparents, and when they died, 1 of my father's brothers (born here) adopted the cat. Everyone thought is was a dumb cat because it wouldn't do anything. Then by accident, someone spoke to the cat in Hungarian.


With that, the cat came when called, etc.


Also understand, that like a child brought up without any interaction (think of the wild children occasional found or a child that lived their life in a cage in the parent's basement, etc) those children many time do not understand language at all. They were not exposed to language.


Supposedly, barking in dogs is an advanced language for them. That wild dogs (not dogs running wild in the US but true wild dogs) howl, not bark. So would a dingo (or an Alaskan wolf with very little human contact) and your pet be able to communicate? I don't know, maybe they can a little thru body language....
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Old 03-18-2019, 03:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by arwenmark View Post
I believe that animals can communicate with like animals where ever they are located, but how they communicate with humans is different based on the human language used. For instance man K-9 dogs are trained in German and that is what you have to use when communicating commands to them.

True, because the criminal will instinctively say off, stop, no, etc. Most ppl do not, or would even think, to use German when under stress like that, so this way the dog will only listen to the handler.
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Old 03-18-2019, 04:33 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
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Originally Posted by bryantm3 View Post
... she's unusually intelligent for a cat. she uses mirrors to fix herself.

Wow!! That is intelligent....I had to take mine to the vet to get her fixed.
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Old 03-18-2019, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Washington state
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arwenmark View Post
I believe that animals can communicate with like animals where ever they are located, but how they communicate with humans is different based on the human language used. For instance man K-9 dogs are trained in German and that is what you have to use when communicating commands to them.
No, you don't. You can switch them over to English commands if you work at it. They'll pick it up very easily.

I might be wrong, but I thought that some dolphins or whales had similar "language" but different tones for certain things.

One thing I've noticed with a lot of cats in the US (although not all), is if you want a cat to come to you, saying "kitty, kitty, kitty" repeatedly and very quickly and tapping your forefinger on the ground will usually get them to come running over. It would be interesting if someone in another country tried that to see if the same applies to cats there.

One should also consider how animals communicate because of how humans taught them. Tame birds like parakeets the world over are taught to sit on a finger. One day my friends and I saw a larger bird (not sure what it was, but obviously a tame one that got loose) fly into a tree. I said I'd go get it and walked over. Because I'd had parakeets, I naturally held out my finger and whistled a little bit. The bird stepped right onto my finger and we were able to get it into a cage and find the owner.

Likewise when my dog decided to visit the neighbors next door when she was making cookies. All the neighbor had to do was ask my dog if he wanted a cookie. Boy, did she get a response. Probably way more than she bargained for.
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Old 03-18-2019, 06:30 PM
 
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I remember when my nephew was 5 or 6-years-old, we were visiting an older retired friend of our family who was born and raised in the US and spoke English but also knew Polish and only talked to his dog in Polish. Anyways, one time we were over this guys house and he told his dog to go get his hat in Polish and the dog did exactly that, then my nephew looks at me and his mom (my older sister) and says, "That guy speaks dog."

It was so cute and funny!
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Old 03-18-2019, 09:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coschristi View Post
I knew a guy who trained his two German Shepard’s using ... German ... of course. And they would only respond to commands in German.

I’m pretty sure my Aussie knows the difference in words like “deer”, “a dog”, “squirrel” & “bunny”, because she’s always out & about in the car with me & the kids so she’s related the sounds to what she sees out the window; “Aww, Mom; did you you see that lady’s dog?” Or; “Look; there’s more deer over there!”

The reason I think that is because I know her reactions. For instance; deer are a very serious matter. Whereas a dog in a passing car is a barking matter. Dogs in cars must be barked at until the car is out of view but deer elicit a stand at attention/intensely stare. You can almost hear her say; “If it wasn’t for this car; I would be herding you right now!”

I think a dog who is fluent in “Dog” would understand the “Dog” from a dog raised in Greece, or France, or India, etc ... because animals are more instinct based, while human language is learning-based. If a dog raised by a Japanese person in Japan accompanied a visitor to an American suburb; I think the dog would understand the; “The mailman is on our street!” bark from the other neighborhood dogs
Police departments train their German Shepherds in German...
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Old 03-18-2019, 09:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
What an interesting question.

The thing is, dogs wouldn't have a common language even within a city, because they don't really meet enough individuals to form a common language among them. Many dogs live their entire lives only interacting with, say, 20 other dogs.

Dog breeds though, DO have a "language" even though the individuals haven't met. Within the breed, they speak the same language. Dogs of other breeds do NOT speak the same language always, and that's where dog parks become very very tricky. And also very hilarious. And that's why the Boston Terrier meet up group at the local dog park was asked to leave. Because Bostons communicate clearly with each other, and the other dogs don't understand that behavior all that much. Especially German Shepherds who do NOT like to be chased in play. haha. Those were some funny times, though.

But it's interesting. Do rats in one inner city neighborhood communicate with each other in a way that rats in another neighborhood wouldn't understand? Probably.

Boston Terriers - bless their little hearts!

Of all the dog breeds I've ever owned Boston terriers have the most outstanding ability to discern what you (their master) means when you speak to them. Depending upon the circumstances, whether they care to "understand" you or not is quite another matter. Sometimes getting your undivided attention is just way more important. Watching you throw a fit just because someone lifted his leg on a chair right in front of you, right after you asked him if he wanted to go out, is an easy sure fire way to pep up an otherwise dull day.

Last edited by TwinbrookNine; 03-18-2019 at 09:58 PM..
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