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Old 03-18-2019, 09:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjseliga View Post
I remember when my nephew was 5 or 6-years-old, we were visiting an older retired friend of our family who was born and raised in the US and spoke English but also knew Polish and only talked to his dog in Polish. Anyways, one time we were over this guys house and he told his dog to go get his hat in Polish and the dog did exactly that, then my nephew looks at me and his mom (my older sister) and says, "That guy speaks dog."

It was so cute and funny!

My grandparents only spoke Polish in the house. Us kids didn't understand a word of it.

My brother and I (we found this out years later) both independently assumed that Polish was what people automatically spoke when most of their teeth had fallen out.
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Old 03-19-2019, 03:20 AM
Status: "Justice-two way street, and not just in favor of barbarians" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: New York Area
14,761 posts, read 5,822,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericjustin2 View Post
Example a dog in the US meets a dog in say Europe. Or a cat in Australia meets another cat in Brazil.

Also i assume animals of different species can't speak to one another by language? Example a dog and a cat or a dog and a fox?
I'm not sure about vocalizations. However, in Canada dogs' tails wag up and down, not side to side.
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Old 03-19-2019, 09:37 AM
 
Location: equator
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I have been perplexed for years why So. American dogs don't chase chickens. Both are out on the streets but seem to ignore each other. Did the Latino dogs just not get the memo about harassing chickens? I am so grateful for this. In the U.S., dogs kill chickens for sport.

My little Banty hen had 13 distinct vocalizations she shared with me, amazing. Each with a specific meaning.
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Old 03-19-2019, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Midwest
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Cats and dogs communicate largely through body language. They can understand some of what our meows and barks mean, and we can understand what some of their meows and barks mean, but body language speaks the loudest.
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Old 03-19-2019, 09:54 AM
 
Location: planet earth
4,139 posts, read 1,521,536 times
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This is two different subjects: Dogs communicating with each other in their own "language" (obviously, they can't communicate with each other in human language), and dogs understanding human language.

Completely different subjects.
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Old 03-19-2019, 10:01 AM
Status: "Justice-two way street, and not just in favor of barbarians" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: New York Area
14,761 posts, read 5,822,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
I have been perplexed for years why So. American dogs don't chase chickens. Both are out on the streets but seem to ignore each other. Did the Latino dogs just not get the memo about harassing chickens? I am so grateful for this. In the U.S., dogs kill chickens for sport.
Difference in training. The same way dogs know that a baby is important to their master and need to be played with more gently than older people.
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Old 03-19-2019, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Interesting article on bird dialects:

https://web.stanford.edu/group/stanf..._Dialects.html
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Old 03-19-2019, 11:34 AM
 
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Interesting question.



At our old place, we backed up to a small nature reserve with a body of water that attracted lots of bird species and little critters. We would have hawks circling depending on the time of year. I observed that, several seconds before I saw a hawk, the crows would caw in a very particular way (think Morse code). Whenever they cawed like that, the songbirds would retreat to the trees and stop singing; the squirrels also seemed to take heed and disappear. It seemed like they all understood the crows' chirping as a warning sign.


My theory is that animals of different species do understand vocalizations of "Danger!"
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Old 03-19-2019, 11:35 AM
 
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A guy I worked with who was of Greek descent told me that American chickens go "cluck, cluck", and Greek chickens go "crou, crou".
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Old 03-19-2019, 11:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
One thing I've noticed with a lot of cats in the US (although not all), is if you want a cat to come to you, saying "kitty, kitty, kitty" repeatedly and very quickly and tapping your forefinger on the ground will usually get them to come running over. It would be interesting if someone in another country tried that to see if the same applies to cats there.

On that note, I've found that no cat can resist coming to you when you make a "Tsh tsh" sound. Well, no American or Canadian cat that I've met, that is.
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