U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-02-2019, 09:10 AM
 
6,231 posts, read 3,521,306 times
Reputation: 21701

Advertisements

Of course those poor dears must be made of steely stuff to be able to do it at all.

I'm a self-taught bird-watcher which means I know little - only what I've gleaned or witnessed. But VTsnowbird, I remember seeing purple and house finches here in So. MN back when my Audubon was still placing them on the East Coast. Only thing I can figure is the birds don't know how to read. LOL

I've noticed that birds, after eating, will clean their beaks on a twig or branch. Left swipe/right swipe. Lately around four o' clock we've had a hummingbird sitting on a wire from our house above the feeder, apparently after his last meal of the day. I notice that he cleans his long beak on his shoulders! Left swipe/right swipe.

I suppose it's because he can. But it seems like bad table manners to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-02-2019, 09:14 AM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
3,272 posts, read 3,094,741 times
Reputation: 4048
Cool Rufous are generally larger and more aggressive, actively defending their favorite feeder

Quote:
Originally Posted by VTsnowbird View Post
The range map for rufous shows them exclusively West of the Rockies.
Correct -- that's their "breeding range".

Here in New England, rufous are considered "vagrants" (no officially established breeding population).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2019, 09:49 AM
 
Location: northern New England
2,353 posts, read 1,019,996 times
Reputation: 9204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonesuch View Post
Correct -- that's their "breeding range".

Here in New England, rufous are considered "vagrants" (no officially established breeding population).
Wow! I will have to look out for them - I would be thrilled to see anything but a RTH.
__________________
Moderator posts will always be Red and can only be discussed via Direct Message.
C-D Home page, TOS (Terms of Service), How to Search, FAQ's, Posting Guide
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2019, 01:55 PM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
3,272 posts, read 3,094,741 times
Reputation: 4048
Talking Another "west coast" hummingbird, the Calliope, shows up in Connecticut

Quote:
Originally Posted by VTsnowbird View Post
Wow! I will have to look out for them - I would be thrilled to see anything but a RTH.
Even more rare up in Vermont.

Another "west coast" hummingbird, the Calliope, shows up in Connecticut; every once in a while one makes it as far north as Manchester, NH.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2019, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,308 posts, read 17,347,832 times
Reputation: 27220
No, but no feeders in an apartment.

My grandparents used to have multiple feeders and they were a common sight in mid-morning during spring and summer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2019, 06:13 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
37,690 posts, read 55,360,122 times
Reputation: 89122
They are very territorial here. I never saw two of them feeding at the same time. Very "nervous" when feeding. Seldom sitting and always watching their surroundings.
__________________
.
"No Copyrighted Material"
Moderated forums:
World, Europe, Texas, Corpus Christi, El Paso, Lubbock, Tyler, Houston, San Antonio, Tallahassee, Macon, Duluth, Fish, Home Interior Design and Decorating, Science and Technology Forums
.

Need help? Click on this: >>> ToS, Mod List, Rules & FAQ's, Guide, CD Home page, How to Search
Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2019, 09:05 PM
 
3,455 posts, read 2,293,463 times
Reputation: 6992
Far fewer hummers so far this year than last year. I've been blaming the explosion of honeysuckle in my yard, which I know the hummers like. Time will tell if I get the usual hordes of them emptying my feeders every day later in the summer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2019, 03:00 PM
 
Location: So Cal
14,543 posts, read 10,691,730 times
Reputation: 13859
That's weird, there seemed to me to be an increase here. We had so much rain this season here in SoCal, that there seems to be an increase in everything. We had a huge "super bloom" of wildflowers. Then we had a huge butterfly migration pass through. Now I'm seeing hummingbirds in areas I don't usually see them in, along with so many butterflies, bees, lizards, doves, squirrels. Coyotes... I unfortunately saw a dead squirrel, skunk, and opossum in the road in the space of about a week. More hawks coming in closer than they usually do...

Just the other day I saw what looked like a hummingbird trying to scare a crow away, I'm assuming to protect its nest.

I'm walking around feeling like Snow White.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top