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View Poll Results: Are you seeing a decline in the number of insects where you live?
yes, definitely 17 38.64%
no 23 52.27%
can't really say that i've paid enough attention to say 2 4.55%
other 2 4.55%
Voters: 44. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-16-2019, 03:05 PM
 
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I live in Southern California. We have milkweed in our yard and have monarchs all the time; seemingly no more nor less this year than ever. The number of swallowtails and other butterflies like mourning cloaks seems down, but I attribute that to the years-long drought which is now over, but undoubtedly had at least a temporary effect on their populations.

In past years we have also had terrible ant problems, with ants getting into the house, but last year and this year--nothing. I think those were non-native ants. On the other hand, in the wilderness area about 1/2 miles from my house there are native red ant hills and they seem to be doing fine.

Otherwise, we have plenty of bees, moths, June bugs, praying mantises, ladybugs, and all kinds of spiders including some very cool jumping spiders and orb weavers. Every so often someone comes to the door saying they're spraying our neighbors' yards for pests and will do ours cheap, but we always decline. We have a nice little ecosystem in our yard and don't want to mess it up. We have lizards and nesting birds including hummingbirds, too. Maybe that doesn't sound like a big deal but the yard is only 4000 square feet in the middle of suburbia, and there is a surprisingly large amount of wildlife in it.
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Old 07-16-2019, 03:07 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,205 posts, read 2,964,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by See If This Works View Post
I live in Southern California...not too many bugs typically BUT when I was a kid in the 1970s we'd see lots of jellyfish in the ocean at the beach. Now we never see them.
Well, most jelly populations ebb and flow (yeah, pun intended) naturally so it might be hard to tease apart what you are actually observing.
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Old 07-16-2019, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
9,180 posts, read 3,021,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
it wasn't all that long ago that in summertime i would have to repeatedly scrub tons of smashed bugs off my vehicles. that just doesn't seem to happen any more at least in my experience. sure, there are plenty of mosquitos i have to contend with in my yard, and masses of katydids that you never actually see still roar in the trees every night from early july through early September, but overall i'm just seeing far fewer bugs around than i used to. just wondering if other people are noticing something similar where they live.
About 10 years ago, the hordes of drosophila fruit flies that come into the house every summer, began to peter out. Then, they disappeared entirely for about 6 years. But this year, there's a few hundred of them buzzing around my kitchen again. Also, the larger, native mosquitoes have vanished, replaced by a much smaller, faster and more persistent tiger mosquito from Asia. There's also another small mosquito that has appeared here, from a similar origin. They are so alert and fast, they're impossible to swat or catch with your hands.

For 12 years now, my house has been invaded each winter, by several thousand little odorous house ants, which I never saw before. In the evening, with doors and windows open, numerous large crane flies come into the house. I never saw those, prior to about 15 years ago. My resident spider patrol stalks them and wraps them in silk, for future food. So generally, there's been an overall increase in insects here in recent years.

There's a very tiny, little brown bat that goes back and forth at night, under my patio roof, so it must be catching some insects. Occasionally, if I have both front and back doors open, it will make a pass right through the house.

Last edited by Steve McDonald; 07-16-2019 at 06:28 PM..
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Old 07-16-2019, 06:38 PM
 
6,606 posts, read 4,113,370 times
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Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
In the evening, with doors and windows open, numerous large crane flies come into the house. I never saw those, prior to about 15 years ago.
We have the crane flies in abundance for about three weeks in June. They have a short life span. I do remember them from my childhood here in SoCal 40+ years ago; we called them "mosquito eaters." I don't know where that name came from as we didn't have mosquitoes to speak of, and adult crane flies don't eat anything. But anyway, maybe they were introduced or gradually made their way up to Oregon more recently.
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Old 07-16-2019, 07:25 PM
 
Location: West Coast
31 posts, read 4,569 times
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I'm seeing a lot more bugs - stink bugs, box elder bugs, etc. and far fewer butterflies, grasshoppers, bees of all types, lacewings, etc.
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Old 07-16-2019, 09:30 PM
 
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From my experience going back to childhood, there are now far fewer butterflies, bumble bees, and beetles than I remember. When one went on a trip, the windshield was inundated with "squashed bugs" for lack of a better term. Do the same trips today and there's little of that, if any. There are quite a few scientific articles written on the dramatic plunge of insect numbers in recent years and a warning of "ecological Armageddon." One study indicated that three-quarters of flying insects in nature reserves across Germany have vanished in 25 years. If anything, this is just one "canary in the coal mine" on the road to ecological disaster with the destruction of habitat - and, yes, climate change.
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Old 07-16-2019, 09:52 PM
 
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no.
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Old 07-16-2019, 11:49 PM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
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We lost our annual Miller moth invasion but we’ve had so many bird species return this last year that could explain it. Seagulls & Pelicans in Colorado & my oldest son swears he saw a Chickadee. A lot more Raptors too.

We had adequate snowpack this year in the high country so we have water & some bugs but the birds are maintaining the balance.
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Old 07-17-2019, 05:33 AM
 
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There have never been anything in the way of insects where I live now compared to NYC or western NY state, even though the countryside surrounds us and there are swathes of empty land and even small farms within the town limits.

But there were some, small flies (not like the U.S. housefly) and bees. In the past few years I hardly see bees or flies. I had screen doors put on my terraces just to keep these out, and now I just leave the doors and windows wide open. Zip, nada, nothing comes in anymore.

Honey making is a small local industry. They must keep their own bees. I wonder what is happening with them.
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Old 07-17-2019, 08:53 AM
 
Location: San Diego
35,266 posts, read 32,223,021 times
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I've seen more bee swarms this year than any year I've been in San Diego. Makes riding a bicycle more of a sport.
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