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View Poll Results: Are you seeing a decline in the number of insects where you live?
yes, definitely 21 39.62%
no 27 50.94%
can't really say that i've paid enough attention to say 3 5.66%
other 2 3.77%
Voters: 53. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-17-2019, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,452 posts, read 7,956,638 times
Reputation: 53615

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We hardly have any bees, but mosquitoes are doing well. I've seen a drop in ladybugs in the fall but an increase in stink bugs. It's rare to see a June bug now too.
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Old 07-17-2019, 09:54 AM
 
6,735 posts, read 8,072,587 times
Reputation: 11631
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
The only people who think MotherNature is in trouble are those who never get out of the city.
<>
* Records show that only the polar areas (ie- N or S of 30* latitude) are warming day & nite temps.
Neither of these statements are true. Back to the topic:

All reputable studies clearly show that flying insect populations (especially night-time flying insects) are way down from years ago. If some people haven't noticed the changes, perhaps they're too young to have witnessed these historic changes...or maybe they just haven't been aware of them.

Human overpopulation--and the resultant loss of natural habitat--has been having a tremendous negative affect on the biological diversity of this planet. Migrating bird species, in particular, have seen dramatic population declines over the past few decades. Many species are down 70 - 90%. Far too many animals are facing extinction due to too many humans. We have yet to learn how to live on this planet without destroying life for its other inhabitants.
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Old 07-17-2019, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,457 posts, read 21,304,257 times
Reputation: 24315
I haven't seen one bee this year in Tucson, and I plant plants that actually attract them, like Red Fairy Dusters. They say we're going through what they're calling an insectadom!
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Old 07-17-2019, 10:47 AM
 
12,612 posts, read 16,707,627 times
Reputation: 24355
Mud wasp populations here in Texas are also certainly not down this year. They fill everything with their mud nests including water hoses, walls, tools, RVs, automobile fender wells, . . . I just killed one in the bedroom with an electronic flyswatter.

Oops! Make that two wasps.
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Old 07-17-2019, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
9,738 posts, read 18,916,069 times
Reputation: 8617
I haven't seen a bat for awhile, although they weren't usually common.



Bees are getting few and far between. Several years ago, I had to hand pollinate if I wanted melons so more bee forage has been planted around. That has helped the pollination rates. At some point, I'd like a top bar beehive up in the backyard. Other than getting honey, it would increase the fruits in the garden.


A bridge next to one of our rental houses has been out for about six months now and the road next to it has been barricaded for that long. Last week, I saw a huge cloud of gnats over the closed roadway. Haven't seen a flying cloud of anything in a long time, so perhaps if the roads were used less (or in this case, not at all) then we would see the insects again?
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Old 07-17-2019, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, LA
3,373 posts, read 2,714,270 times
Reputation: 7589
South Louisiana here. Hell no.
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Old 07-17-2019, 11:15 PM
 
2,631 posts, read 1,944,656 times
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NW Lower Mich: Absolutely the worst year ever for gnats. Spiders here are everywhere, and breeding like rabbits. Got my first mosquito bite in 10 years (I never see 'skeeters in my yard). I think it was the wet May - June (mushrooms are everywhere).
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Old 07-18-2019, 02:05 AM
 
10,141 posts, read 6,350,201 times
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The only insect missing this year is my favorite, lightning bugs. I have not seen one. I'm seeing a slight increase in all the others. I'm seeing new and different dragon flies, some are really beautiful.
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Old 07-18-2019, 06:15 AM
 
1,016 posts, read 756,987 times
Reputation: 2019
Here in Charlotte (inside the loop), I've noticed an uptick in all kinds of wildlife in the past few years. In the past couple of days I've seen a baldfaced hornets nest, mud wasps, paper wasps, several kinds of praying mantis and honey bees galore. The common bugs like wood roaches, crickets, gnats, mosquito, grasshoppers, leaf miners, lady bugs ext. are every bit as common as ever.

As far as other wildlife, I can catch a raccoon or possum any night the trap is set, its hard to get home without seeing someone nearly hit a deer, bats swoop around every dusk, tree frogs and box turtles visit my pond daily, and owls make their presence known at night. Its odd but I see much more diversity of wildlife in the city than I do when I visit parks in the mountains or countryside. Maybe city wildlife has just lost its fear of people so its easier to spot.
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Old 07-18-2019, 08:58 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,784 posts, read 1,070,056 times
Reputation: 6004
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackmichigan View Post
Neither of these statements are true.



.

I beg to differ. I've actually read the research: Global Warming is Not Global


"All reputable studies clearly show " There's the rub. Most studies aren't done well. That famous recent German study is a case in point: poorly defined control, methods and no mention of land use changes surrounding the study area.


"Human overpopulation--and the resultant loss of natural habitat--has been having a tremendous negative affect " At least that part's right. There's a difference between extirpation- local loss of population vs extinction-- complete loss of a taxon. Don't confuse the two.
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