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Old 07-26-2019, 02:24 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,315 posts, read 3,028,422 times
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Just about time for summer to start its turn toward fall...when fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium) ignites on the hills. Even when the flowers are gone and seeds blown, the stems burn in their own right. This patch is across the road from my house.

Enjoy.
Attached Thumbnails
fireweed season!-dscn0132-2-.jpg   fireweed season!-dscn0137-2-.jpg  

Last edited by Parnassia; 07-26-2019 at 02:34 PM..
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Old 07-26-2019, 04:09 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
7,362 posts, read 6,647,164 times
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It looks stunning! What a glorious blaze of colours to see from your house. Do I also see cow parsnip and western red elderberry in that 2nd picture?

I wish fireweed would continue blooming for longer than it does. It's so tenacious and seems to be able to grow out of any kind of medium. This year I was surprised to see a solitary fireweed plant growing 9 stories up out of a teeny, tiny crack in the riverstone aggregate on the outside of our highrise building. It started blooming a couple of weeks ago and is still going strong. Fireweed is perennial so I wonder if it will survive the winter winds up there and come back again next year. Probably the window washers who come twice a year will be told to pull it out though.

Two blocks down from my place there is another solitary fireweed plant that comes back every year in all its glory in the same spot nestled up against the pole of a stop sign. It's 6 years old now and this year it's grown about 6 feet tall, thick and bushy as can be and about 3 feet wide. It's growing out of crushed rock and is just a mass of blooms right now.

Thanks for posting those beautiful pictures. Reminds me of home up north where I grew up.
.
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:20 AM
 
Location: on the wind
7,315 posts, read 3,028,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
It looks stunning! What a glorious blaze of colours to see from your house. Do I also see cow parsnip and western red elderberry in that 2nd picture?
Yes, elderberry has just turned red. Cow parsnip has mostly faded. The hills were white with them a few weeks ago. Goldenrod starting to color up. Next will be purple aster and the Rumex sp.

Took a drive today and saw hundreds of acres of fireweed off in the distance interspersed with patches of spruce, alder, birch, and willows. Looks like a rumpled magenta and green patchwork quilt spread for miles.

Couple more pics to enjoy:
Attached Thumbnails
fireweed season!-dscn0146-2-.jpg   fireweed season!-dscn0143-2-.jpg  

Last edited by Parnassia; 07-27-2019 at 12:47 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 02:01 PM
 
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looks like butterfly & bee heaven.
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Old Yesterday, 06:37 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
looks like butterfly & bee heaven.

No lie. The honey produced from fireweed nectar is premium, it is and gets advertised as a rare treasure with indescribable flavour, considered the champagne of monofloral honeys. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monofloral_honey




Parnassia, they are all fantastic pictures but that 4th picture just knocks the socks off! Worthy as a screen saver or for submission to photo contests. You should post them in the garden forum and photography forum too. Tell people those photos are taken in Alaska and that will make a lot of people's jaws drop to the ground in astonishment.
.
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Old Yesterday, 11:45 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,315 posts, read 3,028,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
No lie. The honey produced from fireweed nectar is premium, it is and gets advertised as a rare treasure with indescribable flavour, considered the champagne of monofloral honeys. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monofloral_honey




Parnassia, they are all fantastic pictures but that 4th picture just knocks the socks off! Worthy as a screen saver or for submission to photo contests. You should post them in the garden forum and photography forum too. Tell people those photos are taken in Alaska and that will make a lot of people's jaws drop to the ground in astonishment.
.
It has been an unusually brilliant year for fireweed for sure. Usually late summer rain cuts the bloom short. Long time locals have been saying they've never seen such glory before. So kind of the place to scatter those contrasting dark green spruces so conveniently don't you think? Can't take much credit for the images...just happened to be at the right place at the right time with a camera. Isn't that how it goes? The very few great photos you take are simply serendipitous. The exposure of those images was tweaked slightly (IMHO most cameras overexpose a little), but not the color.

I drove quite a ways out into the hills, found an even more beautiful view that just about fried the sensor, just in time for the camera batteries to give up; the one time I didn't have extras. Then the Debate; do I drive the 14 miles back to town like a bat for batteries and hope the light doesn't change too much before I get back again or take a chance and try again tomorrow? Ran back to the car, drove like a bat, got the batteries, drove like a bat with many anxious peeks at the arc of the sun, and returned to the scene clenching the steering wheel and my jaw somewhat. I've been reluctant to "share" them online without risking someone stealing the images. I plan to get prints made suitable for framing, maybe some cards too. Glad you've enjoyed them!

Last edited by Parnassia; Today at 12:51 AM..
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Old Today, 05:58 AM
 
Location: NC
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My understanding is that the name comes from the ability of the species to thrive after a fire. To me that means no competition from other plants post fire and probably the likelihood that the fire stimulates seed germination. Plus a high number of seed sleeping in the soil before a fire scarifies the seedcoat
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Old Today, 05:11 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,315 posts, read 3,028,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
My understanding is that the name comes from the ability of the species to thrive after a fire. To me that means no competition from other plants post fire and probably the likelihood that the fire stimulates seed germination. Plus a high number of seed sleeping in the soil before a fire scarifies the seedcoat
It's true that this is a common native that establishes itself after fires, but it is also found in areas that haven't burned for many years. It can definitely compete! The seeds are dispersed by wind, so anywhere they get blown where the soil is disturbed it can establish itself. It is found along just about every roadside, trailside, utility corridor, etc. Some people also think it deserves the name due to the colors of the stems in fall...they turn all sorts of bright rust, red, orange, brown, and yellow colors.
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