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Old 09-20-2019, 11:12 PM
 
10,075 posts, read 10,371,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertFisher View Post
And has ratio of land/sea have deviated significantly over time?
Excellent question. Except for a relatively brief period about 600 million years ago, land is currently at its peak extent.

However, we are approaching a point where the world will be 50%/50% ocean/land. If we extrapolate from past data that should be 3 billion years from now. However, solar luminosity will increase due to helium fusion in the Sun and it is projected that the 50/50 point will be reached between 1 and 2 billion years from now.

Don't wait up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I think it would be better if the planet had 80% water surface and 20% land surface, and a lot less humans. I believe Mother Nature is working to accomplish all of that right now as a matter of fact.
The Earth was roughly 80% water from 300 million to 470 million years ago. Of course there was no humans at all during this period. The earliest fossils of anatomically modern humans are from only about 200,000 years ago.
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Old 09-23-2019, 05:53 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
1,397 posts, read 358,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertFisher View Post
Scientists have figured out how continents floated around from the beginning of earth. But it was all the same pieces of land floating around. Could existing land have sunk into the ocean or new land have emerged from the ocean? And has ratio of land/sea have deviated significantly over time?
Global plate tectonics. Wouldn't it be a hoot if we discovered that the oil we remove from the earth was actually the lubricant that helped the global plates slide on each other and the more we remove creates greater earthquakes? Just sayin.
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Old 09-24-2019, 02:52 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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This could happen to Earth just like it might have happened to Venus: https://www.foxnews.com/science/venu...e-for-3b-years. I don't know if we would like a surface temperature of 864 degrees Fahrenheit; but we are not as close to our sun as Venus.
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Old 09-24-2019, 11:59 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
7,716 posts, read 6,847,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogboa View Post


Global plate tectonics. Wouldn't it be a hoot if we discovered that the oil we remove from the earth was actually the lubricant that helped the global plates slide on each other and the more we remove creates greater earthquakes? Just sayin.

I've read about this theory before and I don't think it's all that far-fetched a theory when you hear what experts have to say about it. There used to be a forum called The Oil Drum The Oil Drum | Discussions about Energy and Our Future (discontinued in 2013 and the writers have moved on to other sites now - The Oil Drum | The Oil Drum writers: Where are they now? ) where some scientists and fossil fuel experts there were discussing it and it sounded entirely plausible.
.
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Old 09-24-2019, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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What's remarkable is that we have any dry land at all. By all rights this should either be a water world or a Mars-like desert. Earth just happened to have the right amount of water to support life, but leaving a good chunk of it high and dry.

BTW, you could fit the entire human race inside a cubic mile, using 21 cubic feet per person. The only reason we need more land is for farming.
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Old Today, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
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If it were evenly split, this is just what would be worse from the top of my head:
--More Carbon Dioxide to make the planet hotter. Longer shorelines would allow more forests to exist, yes, but the deserts would expand too, and less ocean equals less phytoplankton.
--Deserts and steppes would be far larger and more common.
--We'd lose many of the world's major seas/oceans (Mediterranean, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean, Arctic, etc.). It's highly likely that the Mediterranean and Caribbean would turn into vast deserts, while the Gulf of Mexico and Arctic would probably be the world's largest (possibly brackish) lakes.
--The Caspian Sea may well dry up with interior Asia being even drier than it already is.
--The interior of Asia would have a far harsher climate than before, and the interior of North America could become like the interior of Asia with the bigger landmass.
--The Andes highlands, Mount Kilamanjaro and the highest summits of the Rockies, Alps, Antarctic Cordillera, Alaska Range, Sierra Nevada and certain Asian mountain ranges may well become part of the "death zone" that Mount Everest and K2 are in.
--It wouldn't be out of the question to think that Mount Everest and K2 may be in the lower stratosphere.
--Places all over the world would be colder, perhaps over a dozen degrees Fahrenheit so, due to their sudden "rise" in elevation.
--Most of our ocean would probably be discontinuous lakes of varying salinity and lifeforms instead of one continuous water body of moderate salinity. A few "seas" would most likely be freshwater with rivers flowing in, while a few others (i.e. Mediterranean) would probably dry up into mostly salt flats.
--Rivers could then start to carve canyons perhaps miles deep. The Amazon, Nile, Congo and Mississippi would be massive forces to be reckoned with.
--Where rivers meet the oceans, we'd have to build locks or abandon shipping routes due to huge waterfalls.
--Most people would probably move onto the newly exposed land, even in the subtropics, to escape the colder climates and thinner air.
--Some areas of Siberia may be barren or grassy, even with the summers likely to not cool off much, due to the even worse winters giving perhaps even the Dahurian Larches trouble. I can't imagine what a -120F cold wave may do to even them!
--The Canadian Archipelago, Sierra Nevada, Andes, Alps, northern Europe, Patagonia, southern New Zealand, Iceland and northern Alaska would be highly likely to glaciate with the colder temperatures induced by increased altitude.
--The Great Steppes of Eurasia, African Savannas and Great Plains of North America would most likely become deserts permanently due to the drier climate. Like in Siberia, continentality would most likely prevent them from cooling off much in summer but make the winters worse by a proportional amount.
--The tropical forests of northern New Zealand and subtropical forests of the southeastern U.S. would have to retreat to the newly exposed land to avoid being wiped out by cold and drought. Slow-growing species (e.g. Needle Palm, Virginian Juniper) would most likely go extinct unless humans saved them (although the Needle Palms would most likely be saved due to their hardiness).
--Plants like Colorado Blue Spruce and White Fir would probably become threatened or endangered, limited to oases in the lower lands like Californian Fan Palms currently are.
--Whales and Sharks would become vastly less common, but it's unlikely that all or nearly all of them would go extinct.
--Coral reefs would be decimated if not completely wiped out.
--Some cities like Phoenix, Dubai, Alexandria and Perth may be ruined by the hyperaridity they'd likely come to face.
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