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Old 11-16-2019, 08:31 PM
 
1,645 posts, read 910,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocpaul20 View Post
You know what?

As much as you probably are not going to believe me, but I think it is Bigfoot warning other BF that there is a human(you) out and about. They have been known to whistle like that, as well as tree knocks, rock knocks, andd screams, etc.

Oh nevermind contacting Audubon or recording the whistle, OP. It looks like we have the answer
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Old 11-17-2019, 03:04 PM
 
Location: on the wind
8,493 posts, read 3,683,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xPlorer48 View Post
I listened to both owls mentioned but the whistle I hear is not in a series but a single one with a long interval in between. I didn’t have time to contact Audubon but will try next week. We do have a local chapter.
I've heard many pygmy owls calling like this. I'd describe the call as a single toot. The intervals between the calls are quite individual. Pygmies can defend territories using calls year round, but you tend to hear them more often in fall/winter. Possibly because so few other birds are vocal at that season. Try answering the toots...they will often keep responding back and move closer in. You might catch a glimpse of it. Cool little guys.

I had the "honor" of caring for a recovering pygmy owl one winter. They forage along roadsides and get sideswiped by cars a lot. He could fly, but wasn't quite strong or completely re-feathered enough for release. He roamed the house (he had a few favorite roosts...just put strategic newspapers underneath). He knew where the food came from. When he decided he was hungry he'd make increasingly frequent, deliberate flights across my line of sight. Hints. He'd take pink mice directly from my hand if offered at face level. If I held the food too low, he'd pounce and foot me fiercely. He wasn't shy and would perch close to any house guests and watch everything we did or said intently. I found him a dignified, opinionated little personality and still miss him.

Last edited by Parnassia; 11-17-2019 at 03:17 PM..
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Old 11-23-2019, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
2,582 posts, read 3,275,030 times
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Night Whistling Bird....my story. Long ago, on my Ozarks farm, there was a Whippoorwill who routinely parked in a tree right outside my open bedroom window....night after night after night...for those who have not experienced that, "The male's emphatic, chanted whip-poor-will, sometimes repeated for hours on end, is a classic sound of warm summer nights in the countryside of the East". allaboutbirds.org: note: "for hours on end". One night I could take no more, I jumped out of bed, into my boots (only boots!), grabbed my shotgun and a flashlight and started out after that d@$m bird. Just as I spotted him in the tree, he flew off to another, then another and another...just as I spotted him with the flashlight, he was gone. Juggling a shotgun and a flashlight at the same time, and getting a bead on the bird was not easy. After about a half mile, I gave up and returned to bed....fortunately, he never returned.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old 11-23-2019, 02:49 PM
 
Location: on the wind
8,493 posts, read 3,683,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gemstone1 View Post
One night I could take no more, I jumped out of bed, into my boots (only boots!), grabbed my shotgun and a flashlight and started out after that d@$m bird. Just as I spotted him in the tree, he flew off to another, then another and another...just as I spotted him with the flashlight, he was gone. Juggling a shotgun and a flashlight at the same time, and getting a bead on the bird was not easy. After about a half mile, I gave up and returned to bed....fortunately, he never returned.

Regards
Gemstone1
Even better, no one in the neighborhood called the police about the freeroaming, psychotic, armed flasher!

Last edited by Parnassia; 11-23-2019 at 03:59 PM..
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Old 11-23-2019, 06:16 PM
 
Location: CA
460 posts, read 323,403 times
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Default A wild guess, really...

A Nighthawk... maybe?
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Old 11-23-2019, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
2,582 posts, read 3,275,030 times
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"Even better, no one in the neighborhood called the police about the freeroaming, psychotic, armed flasher!"....country living at it's finest....nearest neighbor was 2 miles away...it was just me and the bird.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old 11-23-2019, 10:39 PM
 
1,645 posts, read 910,064 times
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I had one of those gd whippoorwills screaming all night long when I was sleeping in a Forest Service bunkhouse with broken screens on a hot humid night in the middle of a huge mosquito-infested swamp. The mosquitoes were buzzing and swarming around me, it was too hot and muggy to sleep, and that gd bird was out there acting like he was the happiest bird in the world. Drove me nuts until about 3 am
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Old 11-24-2019, 02:19 AM
 
Location: Forest bathing
1,740 posts, read 1,084,713 times
Reputation: 4058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
I've heard many pygmy owls calling like this. I'd describe the call as a single toot. The intervals between the calls are quite individual. Pygmies can defend territories using calls year round, but you tend to hear them more often in fall/winter. Possibly because so few other birds are vocal at that season. Try answering the toots...they will often keep responding back and move closer in. You might catch a glimpse of it. Cool little guys.

I had the "honor" of caring for a recovering pygmy owl one winter. They forage along roadsides and get sideswiped by cars a lot. He could fly, but wasn't quite strong or completely re-feathered enough for release. He roamed the house (he had a few favorite roosts...just put strategic newspapers underneath). He knew where the food came from. When he decided he was hungry he'd make increasingly frequent, deliberate flights across my line of sight. Hints. He'd take pink mice directly from my hand if offered at face level. If I held the food too low, he'd pounce and foot me fiercely. He wasn't shy and would perch close to any house guests and watch everything we did or said intently. I found him a dignified, opinionated little personality and still miss him.
That was a cool thing you did. It may well be a Pygmy owl; we do have them locally. I haven’t heard the sound lately, although I am outside almost every night at 8pm or so.
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Old 12-03-2019, 08:39 AM
 
Location: San Diego
36,952 posts, read 33,294,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deserterer View Post
I had one of those gd whippoorwills screaming all night long when I was sleeping in a Forest Service bunkhouse with broken screens on a hot humid night in the middle of a huge mosquito-infested swamp. The mosquitoes were buzzing and swarming around me, it was too hot and muggy to sleep, and that gd bird was out there acting like he was the happiest bird in the world. Drove me nuts until about 3 am
With all them skeeters to eat he probably was the happiest bird in the world
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Old 12-04-2019, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
2,822 posts, read 2,477,589 times
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I moved last yr from my home located in a Nat'l Forest so I was just surrounded by woods with a small clearing for the house, not much actual open yard. For about 3 yrs we had a Whippoorwill that would start sounding off around dusk and for a few hrs after. Then started up the 2 great horned owls that lived out back. Occasionally one would sit on the front porch (huge!) and they would sound off for several hours, then, the moment the dawn started to break thru there were 2 Pileated woodpeckers and at least one of them started hammering the trees just on the other side of my driveway that was just outside the bedroom window. There is absolutely NO way to sleep through that jack hammering...and I slept with earplugs! Fortunately, the Pileated really only went at it during season. Generally, we enjoyed all the cacophony all around us at night. The Pileated were fun to watch but not to listen to. And unfortunately, once the Great Horned's moved in, we had no bats ever since. They won't live within a mile of an owls nest. So the skeeters were a problem.
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