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Old 09-23-2023, 12:36 PM
 
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We have had the hummingbird moths a few times, but never horn worms on the tomato plants.
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Old 09-23-2023, 04:42 PM
 
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Two possibles hummingbird like moths.

Quote:
Hemaris thysbe, the hummingbird clearwing, is a moth of the family Sphingidae (hawkmoths). Coloration varies between individuals, but typically the moth is olive green and burgundy on its back, and white or yellow and burgundy on the underside. Its wings are transparent with a reddish-brown border. It has light-colored legs, which combined with the lack of striping on the underside is diagnostic. Beating its wings rapidly, H. thysbe hovers to collect nectar from a variety of flowers. The combination of its appearance and its behavior commonly leads to it being confused with a hummingbird.

Hemaris thysbe is found in a large portion of North America, with a range extending from Alaska to Oregon in the west and from Newfoundland to Florida in the east. It is a migratory species and is most common in southern Ontario and the eastern United States. H. thysbe has two broods a year in the southern portion of its range, but only one in the north. As a caterpillar, it feeds on honeysuckle, dogbane,[1] and several types of fruit trees.

Due to the variable appearance of H. thysbe, it has often been mistakenly described as multiple distinct species. It was first described by Johan Christian Fabricius in 1775. The moth is a flower pollinator.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemaris_thysbe

Quote:
Family: Sphingidae

Subfamily: Macroglossinae

Identification: Adults are quite variable in appearance; Bumblebee mimic. The thorax is golden or olive-golden in color, abdomen is black dorsally with 1-2 segments just prior to terminal end being yellow to various extent, while black ventrally. H. diffinis is the only eastern species to exhibit blue abdominal tufts on the first black segment in some freshly emerged specimens. Wings mostly clear with reddish brown terminal borders and dark scaling along veins. While wing maculation is too variable to be 100% diagnostic, diffinis typically has very thin terminal borders and the discal cell is elongate and without scales. However, diffinis can always be distinguished from gracilis and thysbe by two diagnostic characteristics: 1) the black band that crosses the eye and travels down the lateral side of the thorax; 2) diffinis always has black legs.
Wing Span: 1 1/4 - 2 inches (3.2 - 5 cm).

Life History: Adults fly swiftly during the day. Caterpillars pupate in cocoons spun in leaf litter on the ground.
Flight: Two broods from March-August.

Caterpillar Hosts: Snowberry (Symphoricarpos), honeysuckle (Lonicera), dogbane (Apocynum), and dwarf bush honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera).

Adult Food: Nectar from flowers including lantana, dwarf bush honeysuckle, snowberry, orange hawkweed, thistles, lilac, and Canada violet.

Habitat: A wide variety of open habitats, streamsides, fields, gardens, and suburbs.

Range: East of the Continental Divide, through most of the United States to Maine and Florida. Some overlap with Hemaris thetis just east of the Divide.
https://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/...maris-diffinis
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Old 09-23-2023, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Tricity, PL
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They are, indeed, pretty big and I was confused when I first saw them. Not sure what it was.





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Old 09-23-2023, 09:17 PM
 
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Yep, the first time I saw one, I thought it was a hummingbird. They are pretty cool to watch. As for hornworms, the parasitic wasps around here are very efficient killers of hornworms. The only downside is finding deceased hornworms, their guts split open and leaking some goo, on the tomato plants. Yuck. But I pump my fist and thank the parasitic wasps for their diligence.
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Old 09-25-2023, 05:08 PM
 
Location: East Bay, CA
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In Northern California, we've had a bumper crop of white-lined sphinx moths. I had heard of hummingbird moths before, but I finally had one pointed out to me on a trail at Pt. Reyes. For some reason, there were no hummingbirds on these flowers, so the hummingbird moths were able to feed during the day.

In my yard, I've seen them at night after the hummingbirds are done for the day.

Hummingbird Moth _ DSC05280 by photon79, on Flickr

Hummingbird Moth _ DSC05339 by photon79, on Flickr
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Old 09-25-2023, 07:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnazzyB View Post
I saw one last night, about dusk, flitting amongst my flowers. At first, I thought I was seeing a hummingbird, but after studying it a bit, realized it wasn't a bird at all. But it was pretty cool to see anyway.

These are generally known as Hummingbird Hawk-moths, Clearwing Hummingbird Moths and the White-lined Sphinx. Turns out, a couple of the species are plentiful in Missouri (where I live) but until last night, I'd never seen one before. I have no idea which species I saw...but here's a picture...hope the link works...

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...t=0&ajaxserp=0
I used to see those in meadows near bodies of water when I lived in New Mexico. I was so surprised. Had never seen one before. Had to look it up. I will have to search for that photo and try to post it. As I recall, the one I saw looks different than yours, Snazzy. It really is something when you see one for the first time.
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Old 10-19-2023, 07:34 PM
 
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I saw one right at dusk too! At first I thought it was an acid flashback or something, I mean, they look really weird if you've never seen one. A moth w/ a long thin snout that can hover? Thank goodness for google...... and I hope that's the last time I ever say that about google.
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Old 10-20-2023, 01:30 PM
 
Location: deafened by howls of 'racism!!!'
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love the moths - - hate the caterpillars.
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Old 10-20-2023, 01:51 PM
 
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No kidding. I live in a ramshackle old house that looks like a mountain cabin. A couple weeks ago I woke up to a long black worm in my bed, in the middle of the night. Turns out it was a "cutworm" that turns into a moth. How the thing got in my bed is beyond me, though my bed is next to a window A/C that has some spaces that various bugs and other beings can climb through. There's a lot of clover outside my bedroom window, which is apparently what a lot of black cutworms like to eat. I'm tellin' ya, moving to the South is quite an "education."

Last edited by pathrunner; 10-20-2023 at 02:42 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 10-20-2023, 02:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pathrunner View Post
No kidding. I live in a ramshackle old house that looks like a mountain cabin. A couple weeks ago I woke up to a long back worm in my bed, in the middle of the night. Turns out it was a "cutworm" that turns into a moth. How the thing got in my bed is beyond me, though my bed is next to a window A/C that has some spaces that various bugs other beings can climb through. There's a lot of clover outside my bedroom window, which is apparently what a lot of black cutworms like to eat. I'm tellin' ya, moving to the South is quite an "education."
My childhood was in Florida. Big ol 'water bugs' (roaches) that would scatter when a light went on, lizzards hanging from the screen door, gators in the ponds, iguanas in the trees...

I get it. LOL
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